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I measured the db level at 1 meter from my speakers...


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You must listen in a VERY quiet room. The noise floor of many rooms is somewhere around 40 db, right? What does your room read "silent"? It must be down around 20 db or something...

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You must listen in a VERY quiet room. The noise floor of many rooms is somewhere around 40 db, right? What does your room read "silent"? It must be down around 20 db or something...

 

+1 my room is around 36db background level if no HVAC is on. 49db would be very low volume for me.

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And this is what I got.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]17060[/ATTACH]

 

Speakers are my Craigslist find B&W DM601 speakers rated at 88db efficiency and 8ohms. If I am reading this data correctly, I am not using even 1 watt at normal listening levels.

 

You may read the data correctly, but what about the presented data being off all the way. 49dBSPL is "nothing" and most certainly not normal listening levels. Merely think whispering ...

 

PS: Just tried it with a real SPL meter ... 52dBSPL (C weighed - "Fast Response").

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Are you sure that the app isn't measuring SPL relative to (i.e. above) the noise floor, in which case the readings would not be out of line?

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I guess I am missing something. Is your baseline noise floor in the room 49 Db without music playing? Or are you cranking music and seeing that SPL? In that case try another mic. Or do you just listen to music at low levels, which is not a bad thing.

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I guess I am missing something. Is your baseline noise floor in the room 49 Db without music playing? Or are you cranking music and seeing that SPL? In that case try another mic. Or do you just listen to music at low levels, which is not a bad thing.

 

NO, that was with music playing at the moment it said 49db, but the range was from 41db to 69db.

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FWIW, noise floor in my room is about 25dB - wish it were quieter, but there it is.

 

I can listen to music (and movies) up to about 65-70dB (peak), above which it becomes very uncomfortable to me. Can't imagine being comfortable at volumes 80dB+!

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NO, that was with music playing at the moment it said 49db, but the range was from 41db to 69db.

 

Sounds fine to me. My baseline is around 23 w/o music, and low to mid 40s is comfy. Cranking heavy EDM bass lines is a different story, but I cannot handle high volume for long.

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For those who think that 70, or 60, or even 50dBSPL is painfully loud, do notice that a piano-wing plays at 90dBSPL.

 

And also : you can just as well play a piano through the speakers - some enthusiasm assumed by the performer - set the volume to a level of which you think that the piano sounds quite right for real levels, and then watch your SPL meters.

 

Hold at 1m distance and step aside from the back of it yourself (don't allow your body to reflect the sound).

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XXHighEnd (developer)

Phasure NOS1 24/768 Async USB DAC (manufacturer)

Phasure Mach III Audio PC with Linear PSU (manufacturer)

Orelino & Orelo MKII Speakers (designer/supplier)

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I really have no idea.

 

Your Sound Meter app does not know the sensitivity of the microphone built into your smartphone. The absolute dB values that it indicates are just a guess.

 

The app needs to be calibrated (using a hardware sound meter, checking it's values and then adjust the Sound Meter reading with the Calibrate setting) in order to make it usable.

 

Right now, you can only measure relative values (for example to check if the right speaker is as loud as the left one).

Claude

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Independently of how correct or incorrect the db Meter app really is, your amp probably at typical listening levels is indeed working in the single watt level. This is why people can be happy with tube amps that peak at 20W.

 

The reason you're often better off with more watts is usually the current needed for some shot peaks. This will result in better control of the speakers.

 

Slightly OT: one of the things I'd eventually like to own is a power amp with VU meters to show the current watt level, Macintosh style. I really like this concept since I first saw it at a Hifi shop. Unfortunately they seem to have gone out of fashion in most places.

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FWIW, noise floor in my room is about 25dB - wish it were quieter, but there it is.

 

I can listen to music (and movies) up to about 65-70dB (peak), above which it becomes very uncomfortable to me. Can't imagine being comfortable at volumes 80dB+!

I recently installed an app named "SPLnFFT" on my iPad mini 2. The app has an eleven step subjective scale as well as numerical meters and graphical representations of sound. I have no way to calibrate the app nor compare it to a known accurate meter, but its readings seem reasonable. I live in the country; a relatively quiet external environment (high desert). When the internal environment is "quiet," the sound level is around 30 dB. The refrigerator and central air/heating system are significant sound polluters when on (about 50 dB). The heating system is a major annoyance at my typical listening levels. I look forward to summers when the system never comes on.

 

I have never enjoyed music at high volumes, and most of my listening occurs around a median value of 65 dB ("Moderate" on the app scale). The values mentioned are from the dB(A) fast response scale, taken from my normal listening position, about 7.5 ft. from the speakers.

 

Last year, my wife and I had the opportunity to listen to a private home vinyl system consisting of Magico S3 speakers with commensurate gear. The sound quality was totally different from anything I had ever heard. I could not say the sound was better, for I could not place it on any sound continuum I had ever experienced. I estimate the SPL was a minimum of 100 dB, and it was not one bit annoying; a very memorable experience, indeed! I find 85 dB to be an intolerable level on my modest system.

Jim

 

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And this is what I got.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]17060[/ATTACH]

 

Speakers are my Craigslist find B&W DM601 speakers rated at 88db efficiency and 8ohms. If I am reading this data correctly, I am not using even 1 watt at normal listening levels.

 

You are absolutely right. 1 Watt of power is enough for a nice medium sound preassure level.

 

Just for the maths:

1 dB is the absolut lowest level, a person can hear.

An increment of 1 dB is the smallest increment, a person can hear. (in general)

+3 dB is double the power / energy

+ 10 dB is doubling the volume level

 

Some examples:

1 speaker is actually playing with 90 dB, but two of them (each with 90 dB) play with 93 dB (=double the power)

But ten speakers, each of with plays 90 dB, they all together play 100 dB

 

Your speakers are rated with 88 dB / 1 Watt

2 Watt are good for 91 dB

4 W 94 dB

8 W 97 dB

16 W 100 dB

32 W 103 dB

64 W 106 dB

128 W 109 dB

256 W 112 dB

...

 

When you really crank up the volume, you will reach these levels of sound preassure very fast. But I don't know about everyones imagination of "loud"?!

 

My slogan: Above 100 dB is where the fun begins. :)

 

P.S.: In my room the iPhone shows a level of 26 dB, I think, this is the lower limit of the equipment. I tried to make some very low noise and the meter did not "shake". But around listening levels the iPhone is not bad at all, I compared it with a calibrated analyzer, and it was ony 1 or 2 dB's away.

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