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Network Attached Storage devices are all the rage these days... But what to do about water and fire?


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Keep an offsite backup? Sure that might work for a small music collection. Do you trust a third party with other important digital documents and files?

 

What about a 5 bay Synology NAS that is both fire and water proof and runs Synology DSM?

 

Here it is.

 

ioSafe 1513+, World's First Disaster Proof Private Cloud | NAS (network attached storage) RAID and File Server powered by Synology DSM - disk station manager

 

basically the same thing as the Synology +1513, inside a fire and water proof container. There are even identical expansion units for more storage, also from Synology, that are also water and fire proof. This is what I have been using for a short while now and have finally remembered to bring it to the attention of the people here that might like to know.

 

Worried about physical theft? You can mount these to the floor and secure them.

No electron left behind.

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Keep an offsite backup? Sure that might work for a small music collection.

 

Depends what you mean by "offsite backup".

 

I have a 11.2 TB in my collection and my offsite backup is a collection of external drives that I keep in a safe location. I update them each week. It would be impossible to use a cloud service for something like this with the upload speed that my ISP allows.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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Depends what you mean by "offsite backup".

 

I have a 11.2 TB in my collection and my offsite backup is a collection of external drives that I keep in a safe location. I update them each week. It would be impossible to use a cloud service for something like this with the upload speed that my ISP allows.

 

11.2 TB is way too much for a cloud service, IMO. Keeping disks off premises is one way to do it. For me I find this to be a lot less hassle.

 

The other benefit you are not getting is the No Questions Asked Data Recovery Service that comes with, and can be added to, the IoSafe/Synology NAS.

 

http://iosafe.com/products-5baynas-drs

 

Data Recovery Service for any reason. No deductible for initial

Up to $2500 included for forensic data recovery if required

Up to $5000 per TB included for DRS Pro

Global, mail-in repair coverage with free shipping for DRS events

Direct access to ioSafe's experts — one point of contact

Replacement hardware pre-loaded with recovered data

Extend No-Hassle Warranty too.

Only 99¢ per Terabyte/Month to extend coverage up to 5 years — compare to cloud backup!

No electron left behind.

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Keep an offsite backup? Sure that might work for a small music collection. Do you trust a third party with other important digital documents and files?

.

Don't get your argument. I just clone my music drive regularly and keep the clone at the office. And with incremental backups the size really doesn't matter that much. Much safer than anything you could do even with a protected drive.

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Don't get your argument. I just clone my music drive regularly and keep the clone at the office. And with incremental backups the size really doesn't matter that much. Much safer than anything you could do even with a protected drive.

 

OK, I should have said cloud back up. Jesus... To me trucking drives back and forth just seems like a hassle and what would happen if the night the fire happened is the night you have both sets at home?

No electron left behind.

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You protect against that by maintaining more than one backup, and never having all sets of storage together at any time.
Yup. I keep one at home and another at the weekend house and I keep them synched. They back-up each other and I have access to my collection at either site.

Kal Rubinson

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

 

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You protect against that by maintaining more than one backup, and never having all sets of storage together at any time.

 

AND here I thought that you guys and gals, who fret over every minute bit of your music would fall over yourselves and push everyone out of your way to get a NAS that is theft, fire, and water proof...

 

Boy was I ever wrong.

No electron left behind.

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Yup. I keep one at home and another at the weekend house and I keep them synched. They back-up each other and I have access to my collection at either site.

 

Just wondering how you do this.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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Getting back to the OP's thread subject - ioSafe storage.

 

I use an ioSafe N2 and have been very happy with it. Hopefully I will never really have to test it. Mine is hidden and bolted down.

 

Before You Buy 94 | TWiT.TV

Nearfield setup- PPA USB>Curious Evolved>Yggy OG>Freya+>Mono Trys>Harbeth P3ESR 40th&Martin Logan Dynamo 1100X& Burson Soloist w/ Super Charger> Mr.Speakers Ether 2,& Technics 1500C, Arcromat> SoundSmith Carmen MkII > Zu Mission>Parks Puffin Toslink.. Blue Jeans interconnects, Pangea power cables, IsoAcoustics feet, Goldpoint SW2X

 

 

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BitTorrent Synch installed in each one. The synching is slow but it takes me 2hours to get there by car, anyway.

 

Thanks!

 

I would not have thought to use BitTorrent for THIS purpose.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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Hi AudioDoc -

 

This is a good idea, but you cannot fully trust it. Yes, typically house fires burn around 1200 degrees F., however, there are some gotchas here. The ioSafe is rated for 1550 degrees for up to 30 minutes, but hot spots in a house fire often reach 2000 degrees. If by some off chance, a lightening strike is involved, the instantaneous air temperatures near the impact point can exceed 50,000 degrees. That is only momentary of course, but plenty hot enough to cause damage to even the best fire proof safes.

 

Also, the internal temperature that is in the "safe zone" maintained by a fire safe is still plenty hot for electronics, especially spinning disks. I believe the safe temp by ASTM E119 is 350 degrees F. Thirty minutes in a 350 degree F. oven is not healthy for most disks, though it is almost always possible to retrieve information from them.

 

Then comes the issue of what happens if if the safe is immersed into liquid for an extended period? Or worse, it is physically jolted by a collapsing floor, or thrown into a pool by a firefighter. (Fact - happened! :))

 

All of which is to say, the ioSafe greatly increases your chances of not loosing any data, but is not as safe as maintaing an offsite backup. Yes, that is conventional thinking, but conventional thinking is usually conventional - and conservative - for a reason. What you might consider doing is setting up a small system in your office or in some offsite location and making it act like a private cloud, with your backups also sent to the second system as convenient. This will grant you an even higher level of comfort and assurance that your music is not going to get lost.

 

It is real an interesting thing to think about though. Offhand, I cannot think of any really safe way to house a disk array that would protect it from different disasters. But some smart guy will! The ioSafe is at least, a good start. :)

 

-Paul

Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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Hi AudioDoc -

 

This is a good idea, but you cannot fully trust it. Yes, typically house fires burn around 1200 degrees F., however, there are some gotchas here. The ioSafe is rated for 1550 degrees for up to 30 minutes, but hot spots in a house fire often reach 2000 degrees. If by some off chance, a lightening strike is involved, the instantaneous air temperatures near the impact point can exceed 50,000 degrees. That is only momentary of course, but plenty hot enough to cause damage to even the best fire proof safes.

 

Also, the internal temperature that is in the "safe zone" maintained by a fire safe is still plenty hot for electronics, especially spinning disks. I believe the safe temp by ASTM E119 is 350 degrees F. Thirty minutes in a 350 degree F. oven is not healthy for most disks, though it is almost always possible to retrieve information from them.

 

Then comes the issue of what happens if if the safe is immersed into liquid for an extended period? Or worse, it is physically jolted by a collapsing floor, or thrown into a pool by a firefighter. (Fact - happened! :))

 

All of which is to say, the ioSafe greatly increases your chances of not loosing any data, but is not as safe as maintaing an offsite backup. Yes, that is conventional thinking, but conventional thinking is usually conventional - and conservative - for a reason. What you might consider doing is setting up a small system in your office or in some offsite location and making it act like a private cloud, with your backups also sent to the second system as convenient. This will grant you an even higher level of comfort and assurance that your music is not going to get lost.

 

It is real an interesting thing to think about though. Offhand, I cannot think of any really safe way to house a disk array that would protect it from different disasters. But some smart guy will! The ioSafe is at least, a good start. :)

 

-Paul

 

 

ok so in this disaster fantasy land everyone lives in... What if your house AND the offsite backup both suffer meteorite hits at the same time?

 

I am going back over to Rennlist where the only thing to discuss is whether or not your GT3 has burst into flame yet...

 

I am also going to find out how ioSafe tested their units.

 

edit: I am also pretty sure the Hospital doesn't want me keeping a backup NAS full of my personal files on their system.

No electron left behind.

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LOL! Fantasy? How about a Hurricane? Been there, done that.

 

In business ops, you have multiple redundant sites, backup tape and archives, and other things like that. Here for example, the primary danger is from Tornadoes, which always approach from the southwest and proceed in a northeast pattern. Putting a copy of data 15 miles South East of this location is acceptable, so long as I have another copy of the data at least 500 miles away. ;)

 

At home, usually keeping a set of backups in your office drawer or some other similar arrangement is "good enough." Or using an online backup site, which is a little expensive, but very convenient. That is what I do, with the added safety net of putting a total backup (on tape right now, soon to be on disk) into a Safe Deposit box once a year - right after I file my tax return. :)

 

-Paul

 

 

ok so in this disaster fantasy land everyone lives in... What if your house AND the offsite backup both suffer meteorite hits at the same time?

 

I am going back over to Rennlist where the only thing to discuss is whether or not your GT3 has burst into flame yet...

 

I am also going to find out how ioSafe tested their units.

 

edit: I am also pretty sure the Hospital doesn't want me keeping a backup NAS full of my personal files on their system.

Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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LOL! Fantasy? How about a Hurricane? Been there, done that.

 

In business ops, you have multiple redundant sites, backup tape and archives, and other things like that. Here for example, the primary danger is from Tornadoes, which always approach from the southwest and proceed in a northeast pattern. Putting a copy of data 15 miles South East of this location is acceptable, so long as I have another copy of the data at least 500 miles away. ;)

 

At home, usually keeping a set of backups in your office drawer or some other similar arrangement is "good enough." Or using an online backup site, which is a little expensive, but very convenient. That is what I do, with the added safety net of putting a total backup (on tape right now, soon to be on disk) into a Safe Deposit box once a year - right after I file my tax return. :)

 

-Paul

 

I have been at sea during a hurricane, does that count?

No electron left behind.

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I have been at sea during a hurricane, does that count?

 

I've dropped my Iphone in the mens room

Appreciation of audio is a completely subjective human experience. Measurements can provide a measure of insight, but are no substitute for human judgment. Why are we looking to reduce a subjective experience to objective criteria anyway? The subtleties of music and audio reproduction are for those who appreciate it. Differentiation by numbers is for those who do not." — Nelson Pass

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