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Does HQplayer or any player have a setting to keep decibel level constant


beerandmusic
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Are you talking about tracks you have in your own library?

If so look into Replay Gain. Its a program you run against your tracks and it assigns a numerical

number to their average level. Then when you play back these tracks in a player that has the program built in, it will work to keep playback volumes fairly equal from track to track.

Best thing about it is it doesn't affect the original file in any way and is only active when you turn it on in a player when desired..

Many media players have Replay Gain available such as Foobar 2000

"The gullibility of audiophiles is what astonishes me the most, even after all these years. How is it possible, how did it ever happen, that they trust fairy-tale purveyors and mystic gurus more than reliable sources of scientific information?"

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Audirvana has that feature also... replay gain. Mac only.

 

 

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Replay gain is a way to perform track-to-track dynamic range compression...

 

If you take for example some Pink Floyd album, or for example Roger Water's Amused to Death, some tracks are meant to be louder and some less loud. Screwing that up with replay gain is WrongThingToDo™. ;) It's another way to participate in Loudness War, trying to make everything sound flat.

Signalyst - Developer of HQPlayer

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Replay gain is a way to perform track-to-track dynamic range compression...

 

If you take for example some Pink Floyd album, or for example Roger Water's Amused to Death, some tracks are meant to be louder and some less loud. Screwing that up with replay gain is WrongThingToDo™. ;) It's another way to participate in Loudness War, trying to make everything sound flat.

 

Of course it is much less of an issue if listening to full albums. Most albums are mastered so that tracks are are at similar volume levels. Mostly an issue with playlists.

 

Personaly, I feel that using replay gain takes some life out of the music. Everytime I try it, I very quickly go back to listening with it off.

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Of course it is much less of an issue if listening to full albums. Most albums are mastered so that tracks are are at similar volume levels. Mostly an issue with playlists.

 

Personaly, I feel that using replay gain takes some life out of the music. Everytime I try it, I very quickly go back to listening with it off.

It's not something I would ever consider using for serious listening.

But for background music at a party or whenever you would want the level to remain fairly constant it's perfect.

I have a Sansa Clip+ media player (with Replay Gain built in) that I take to the swimming pool every day with a portable amp. Set off to the side for everyone's enjoyment it used to be a bit of pain. I'd put about 30 albums on shuffle and one song would be blasting to the point of annoying some folks, then the next you could barely hear. Running Replay Gain against all the files then turning it on in the Sansa was the perfect answer.

"The gullibility of audiophiles is what astonishes me the most, even after all these years. How is it possible, how did it ever happen, that they trust fairy-tale purveyors and mystic gurus more than reliable sources of scientific information?"

Peter Aczel - The Audio Critic

no-mqa-sm.jpg

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