Jump to content
IGNORED

mp3 CD


Recommended Posts

Is there a way to make an mp3 CD to play in car CD player. I tried making a playlist in iTunes 12.12.0 and set all the preference to mp3 even in the advanced pref's and still won't play in my Honda Accord 2005 or home stereo. I am using CD-R's.

Link to comment

Most CD players can only handle CD-Rs that are recorded as audio CDs, not data CDs containing mp3 files.

 

Here are instructions on how to create an audio CD in iTunes 12:

 

https://support.apple.com/kb/PH19494?locale=en_US&viewlocale=en_US

 

Sorry I've misunderstood what you are trying to do.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

Link to comment

Simple, burn mp3's out of iTunes or where ever and have them play in my car. I'm not an mp3 lover but this is for others. Not a data CD Thanks for the reply and link but I did everything it says in that link and CD won't play either in my car or home stereo.

Link to comment

Do you have the music in iTunes in MP3 format?

 

If not you need to create a MP3 copy of the music (in iTunes) add them to a playlist and then burn that playlist to a MP3 CD-R.

 

See -- https://support.apple.com/kb/PH12348?locale=en_US

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

Link to comment
Simple, burn mp3's out of iTunes or where ever and have them play in my car. I'm not an mp3 lover but this is for others. Not a data CD Thanks for the reply and link but I did everything it says in that link and CD won't play either in my car or home stereo.

 

1. Go into iTunes prefs, and change Import Settings to "AIFF Encoder/Automatic".

2. Select the MP3's in your iTunes library that you want to convert.

3. From the iTunes menu bar > Advanced > Create AIFF Version. Your MP3's will be duplicated as AIFF files in the same iTunes folder(s) where they currently reside.

4. Select the AIFF files, then from the iTunes menu bar > File > New Playlist From Selection.

5. Select the playlist(s), then from the iTunes menu bar > Burn Playlist To Disc. Insert blank CD-R when prompted.

Link to comment

No I don't know that but as of so far there not playing. and the post from "wwaldmanfan" above yours sounds like he or she want me to burn AIFF but I just want to make a playable mp3 CD not for me but for my daughter. I hate mp3's and this is just another reason why. I knew years ago you couldn't do this but I thought things progressed beyond that? Oh and the CD won't play on my home CD player that is an old Rotel RCD 971 which I'll be selling soon.

Link to comment

I convert files to WAV and them burn them as Audio CD, these play like store bought CDs in my wife's car. Note that you become limited to about a dozen songs, as opposed to 30+ tracks when using MP3. I think this is the same thing wwaldmanfan mentioned though I have never done it with AIFF files.

Analog: Koetsu Rosewood > VPI Aries 3 w/SDS > EAR 834P > EAR 834L: Audiodesk cleaner

Digital Fun: DAS > CAPS v3 w/LPS (JRMC) SOtM USB > Lynx Hilo > EAR 834L

Digital Serious: DAS > CAPS v3 w/LPS (HQPlayer) Ethernet > SMS-100 NAA > Lampi DSD L4 G5 > EAR 834L

Digital Disc: Oppo BDP 95 > EAR 834L

Output: EAR 834L > Xilica XP4080 DSP > Odessey Stratos Mono Extreme > Legacy Aeris

Phones: EAR 834L > Little Dot Mk ii > Senheiser HD 800

Link to comment
No I don't know that but as of so far there not playing. and the post from "wwaldmanfan" above yours sounds like he or she want me to burn AIFF but I just want to make a playable mp3 CD not for me but for my daughter. I hate mp3's and this is just another reason why. I knew years ago you couldn't do this but I thought things progressed beyond that? Oh and the CD won't play on my home CD player that is an old Rotel RCD 971 which I'll be selling soon.

 

When you ask for help, instead of being obstinate, take advice from those who offer to help you. BTW, I am a "he" and have been involved in this hobby, in one way or another, for about 50 years.

 

If you transcode your MP3's to AIFF or WAV, you still have the same MP3 songs but in a different, uncompressed container, one which is recognized by CD players.

 

The sound quality will remain identical to the original MP3's, and it will work. However, the files will be larger, so you won't be able to fit as many songs on the CD.

Link to comment
Simple, burn mp3's out of iTunes or where ever and have them play in my car. I'm not an mp3 lover but this is for others. Not a data CD Thanks for the reply and link but I did everything it says in that link and CD won't play either in my car or home stereo.

 

MP3s are data files representing audio, they are not Redbook audio CDs. Most CD players will not play them. The player requires special hardware and firmware that all but a few CD players lack. Some car CD players will play MP3s, and most likely will say-so on the player's faceplate. But don't count on it. Best to check first before wasting your time burning an MP3 disk.

George

Link to comment
Simple, burn mp3's out of iTunes or where ever and have them play in my car. I'm not an mp3 lover but this is for others. Not a data CD Thanks for the reply and link but I did everything it says in that link and CD won't play either in my car or home stereo.

 

I suspect that you selected "MP3 CD" as the Disc Format.

 

The Disc Format needs to be "Audio CD" if you want to use it in a regular CD player. Don't worry about converting to AIFF. iTunes will do this automatically when it creates the Audio CD.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

Link to comment

Sorry I wasn't being obstinate and I value all responses. I did try your way but still would't play. While in iTunes I was curious what kind of file it was changed to so I did a cmd I on one file and it was this MPEG-1, Layer 3 but they still would't play. Thank you very much for your help.

Link to comment
Sorry I wasn't being obstinate and I value all responses. I did try your way but still would't play. While in iTunes I was curious what kind of file it was changed to so I did a cmd I on one file and it was this MPEG-1, Layer 3 but they still would't play. Thank you very much for your help.

 

If the files on the disc are in this format, it is not a Redbook standard Audio CD and most CD players will not able to play it.

 

As I mentioned in my previous message, after you select "Burn Playlist to Disc", you need to burn the disc as an Audio CD:

 

ScreenSnapz028.jpg

 

This will convert your files to uncompressed PCM (AIFF) and create a Redbook standard CD.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

Link to comment
Will try one more time. I have plenty of AIFF files full Rez but I also have many mp3's and was ask by my daughter to try and make a bunch of mp3 CD were going on a road trip arrgh;)

 

The source format doesn't really matter. Redbook audio CDs contain uncompressed PCM (AIFF/WAV) but if your source files are in mp3 format then iTunes will convert them to uncompressed PCM when it creates the audio CD.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

Link to comment
Is there a way to make an mp3 CD to play in car CD player. I tried making a playlist in iTunes 12.12.0 and set all the preference to mp3 even in the advanced pref's and still won't play in my Honda Accord 2005 or home stereo. I am using CD-R's.

 

It depends on the car CD player. My 2007 Audi, with an in-dash 6 CD changer, identifies that MP3 discs can be played in the player's owner's manual (not the same thing as the Audi's owner's manual). I burn pure "data CDs" loaded up with a single layer of MP3 files. No folders or sub folders on the disk, in my case I don't know whether folders would work or not--but I think they are supposed to.

Anyway, I burn only 320k bps MP3 files and I can get something like 5 hours and 6 minutes per disc. The Audi CD player treats them exactly like standard CDs, and given road noise they sound quite like standard CDs. In total, my changer holds 30 1/2 hours of music for the road.

 

I am a Windows PC person, have never used any form of iTunes, no playlists involved whatsoever, just use pretty garden variety CD burning software to load up the disc with the MP3 files. Oh, some testing has shown these MP3 discs also work in a newer Audi, a recent Lexus SUV, and a Chevy pick-up truck. YMMV.

Link to comment

I would believe you've exhausted all possibilities, so I'm identifying the following only as MY first stage...one that gave me some hope my car's CD player had the potential to work the way I wanted it to...

 

The first CD-R I burned had only a single MP3 file on it. No text files, no folders, an otherwise empty disc except for the single MP3 file. And the disc was closed so nothing further could be burned to it in the future. My car's CD player played that file perfectly.

Link to comment
Well the only thing so far that works for me is using Audacity to convert to AIFF then do a playlist as Aidio CD. Can't get anything eles to work so I end up with really a regular CD with AIFF's with about 380MB on one disk.

 

A Redbook standard audio CDs looks like a regular CD with AIFF files on it when you put it into a computer. Does it play on your car's CD player?

 

BTW, if you are on a Mac, you can also use something like Burn or Toast to create an Audio CD without the need to convert to AIFF first.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

Link to comment
A Redbook standard audio CDs looks like a regular CD with AIFF files on it when you put it into a computer.

 

Actually, the computer (Windows explorer) sees no files on it but just displays shortcuts (which always have a 1/1/1995 date) to the individual tracks. If real files can be seen, it's not an audio CD but a data CD.

 

phantomburner_audio_cd.gif

Claude

Link to comment
Actually, the computer (Windows explorer) sees no files on it but just displays shortcuts (which always have a 1/1/1995 date) to the individual tracks. If real files can be seen, it's not an audio CD but a data CD.

 

phantomburner_audio_cd.gif

 

Thanks for sharing this. It has been at least 15 years since I used a Windows box for ripping CDs so I forgot how they handle audio CDs.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

Link to comment
It depends on the car CD player. My 2007 Audi, with an in-dash 6 CD changer, identifies that MP3 discs can be played in the player's owner's manual (not the same thing as the Audi's owner's manual). I burn pure "data CDs" loaded up with a single layer of MP3 files. No folders or sub folders on the disk, in my case I don't know whether folders would work or not--but I think they are supposed to.

Anyway, I burn only 320k bps MP3 files and I can get something like 5 hours and 6 minutes per disc. The Audi CD player treats them exactly like standard CDs, and given road noise they sound quite like standard CDs. In total, my changer holds 30 1/2 hours of music for the road.

 

I am a Windows PC person, have never used any form of iTunes, no playlists involved whatsoever, just use pretty garden variety CD burning software to load up the disc with the MP3 files. Oh, some testing has shown these MP3 discs also work in a newer Audi, a recent Lexus SUV, and a Chevy pick-up truck. YMMV.

 

You are right about MP3 being quite good enough for the car. Talk about a hostile environment for music! For a couple of years, I had Sirius/XM radio in the car. I didn't know that it was heavily digitally compressed until somebody told me (or I read it - don't remember which). Even classical sounded fine in the car. When I finally heard an in-home version, I couldn't believe how apparent the compression artifacts were! The background noise and general mid-fi quality of most car audio completely masked them. Perhaps if one had a Rolls Royce or a Maybach limo, It would be worth spending money for a really great in-car audio system, but for the rest of us, It doesn't seem to be worth the effort. Where I live now, there is "no" radio. The FM dial is strewn with (what I consider) junk from one end of the dial to the other. Right now, I'm using my iPod Nano for music in the car, but I'm seriously considering getting Sirius/XM again just to have decent radio.

George

Link to comment
Actually, the computer (Windows explorer) sees no files on it but just displays shortcuts (which always have a 1/1/1995 date) to the individual tracks. If real files can be seen, it's not an audio CD but a data CD.

 

 

 

OS X Finder does misleadingly display a list of AIFF files for the content of a Red Book audio CD. Finder shows the AIFF files that will be created if the audio is ripped to the computer by dragging the "files" (i.e. the tracks) from the CD to a folder on a hard drive.

Link to comment
OS X Finder does misleadingly display a list of AIFF files for the content of a Red Book audio CD. Finder shows the AIFF files that will be created if the audio is ripped to the computer by dragging the "files" (i.e. the tracks) from the CD to a folder on a hard drive.

 

That's what I thought. Some years ago, there were Windows tools that did the same in Windows Explorer, but they were never as popular as more configurable software such as EAC.

Claude

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...