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gmgraves

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Everything posted by gmgraves

  1. You are absolutely correct. The only movies that I liked Pacino in were the three “Godfather” movies. After that, he became less and less interesting to me as an actor, and now, as you say, he’s become a caricature of himself.
  2. I bought a third-party Lightening camera adaptor from Amazon. Brand is LAOSUI, $14.99. Takes USB “A”, USB “C”, flash card, and micro SD Card. Works perfectly with iOS 13.X. Of course, we won’t know about iOS 14, until it ships next month. But I have had no issues. I’ve even put music on a flash card, plugged it into this adapter and it plays through the iPhone/iPad perfectly! Of course, I still have an iPhone 6S, so it has a headphone jack (the last one to do so?) as does my iPad 6. $15 is way cheaper than Apple’s $39, and of course this one is more versatile than the Apple adapter as well.
  3. Speaking of Yma Sumac, are you aware that her real name was Amy Camus and she wasn’t an Inca from Peru, but a Jewish girl from Brooklyn NY with a great coloratura soprano voice. I’ve an amusing story about her. About 20 years ago, I was sitting in a local nightclub in Palo Alto CA, recording a local jazz quartet. Between sets, the musicians spoke among themselves. One musician asked another: “What have you been up to lately?” The other responded, “I was recently in a band backing Yma Sumac”. The first asked, “How was she?” The second responded “Old, and fat, and mean!” True sto
  4. Actually the Quintessential “Cheap Fiat” is the Fiat 500 from 1957 - 197x. When it came out, the average Italian could buy this diminutive car for the Lire equivalent of US$250.00.
  5. Very lovely. Of course, this is the era of the Vittorio Jano Alfa Romeos. Starting with the Zagato bodied 6C1750 Of 1927 and ending with the 8C2900 in 1939. PS. I took all of these pictures myself. None are from the Internet. I have more than ten-thousand photographs of cars that I’ve taken over the years.
  6. In the ‘50’s, and well into the ‘70’s, the Italian carozzeria (coach builders) such as PinninFarina, Bertone, Touring, Zagato, Ghia, Vignale (the picture you posted, above, is a Vignale body), etc. made some of the most interesting (not to mention beautiful) car bodies in the world. What happened is that when the world went to unibody construction, there was no longer a chassis that could take custom bodies. This more or less limited the carozzeria’s ability to build custom bodies because they had to fashion a custom unibody structure as well as the custom styling. In the 1960’s, Fiat built th
  7. I have always thought that Picasso was a bit of a charlatan. I’ve often wondered if his work wasn’t a joke perpetrated on the art world on purpose by him. Of course we can but wonder. Because there’s no way to know.
  8. It really doesn’t matter if we are comfortable with this “collective taste“ or not. These decisions are made for us, decisions about greatness, whether it’s art, artists or famous people are made by those who set themselves up as the arbiters of what’s good and what’s not. For instance, our school systems dry clean our national heroes for us almost to the point of canonization. We grow up in the US believing that, for instance, Thomas Edison and Henry Ford were gods. Now we find out that Edison was a tireless self-promoter, plagiarist, charlatan and all around unpleasant fellow who passed off
  9. While you are right. Humanity’s collective regard for any art or artist forms the hierarchy that ranks both. That ranking puts Mozart higher than Britany Spears (and most everybody else), so basically we grow up being told that a Bach, a Beethoven, and a Mozart represent the highest attainment of Western culture. - even if personally, many of us don’t appreciate their music and some of us have never heard any of their work, we know the names, and we know that they are considered the pinnacle of our civilization.
  10. Agree. 100%! A little known fact, Fisher-Dieskau has the largest discography of any recording artist in history. The sheer number of albums that guy recorded over his lifetime is truly staggering. Last time I saw the number it was in the hundreds. I wonder how many are still available as CD reissues today?
  11. You are right. This is extremely subjective and it mostly revolves around personal criteria. For instance, I don’t value Britaney Spears or Barry Manilow, or Peter Gabriel, or for that matter, John Lennon, Micheal Jackson or Mick Jagger, as singers because they do not meet my criteria for a vocalist. Sinatra does, Crosby does, William Warfield does, as does Pavarotti, Ella Fitzgerald, And Dinah Washington (Does anyone here remember Minnie Ripperton, a true coloratura soprano?). But I certainly don’t agree with you that art is universally valueless. Art is probably the only human endeavor tha
  12. Crosby’s singing was often said to be effortless as was Perry Como’s. One singer from the 1960’s that always thought had an incredible range which he seemed to use effortlessly was Roy Orbison.
  13. Russ Colombo comes to mind as a very popular crooner (with a great voice) in his day who has been “lost to history“. To a lesser extent, I would add Dick Haymes. Helen Forest and Jane Froman, etc.
  14. She did have a pleasant voice, but the songs that she sang with her brother were banal beyond belief. Still, the way she died was a real tragedy, and a useless death.
  15. One final word on the subject. I believe that Crosby attained his reputation for being a not so nice guy due to a book one of his sons by his first wife Dixie Lee wrote about what a terrible father and person he was. I don’t recall which one of his four sons wrote the book, but apparently he was “too busy” during his first marriage, to be a parent (Dixie Lee Crosby died, they did not divorce). His second wife, Kathy Crosby (the shrunken princess in the film “The Second Voyage of Sinbad” with Kerwin Mathews) gave him two more kids, and this time, apparently, he doted on them (according to an in
  16. That’s what it’s called now. During the time that I am talking about and for many decades going back to the early part of the 20th Century when it was a Stanford University hangout, it had another name. But thanks to you, I was able to use “Alpine Inn“ as a starting place to find what it used to be called. It was Rositties, which people used to pronounce as “Rozot-eez”. Again, many thanks. It was driving me crazy (not a long drive under the best of circumstances).
  17. You aren’t alone. My talents go unnoticed by the world too.😢
  18. Here’s my favorite: Don’t get me wrong, I like Frankie’s version too, but this one hits me where I live. When I was in college, Columbia Records put out a “Showboat” revival cast album that had Warfield reprise his movie role. That version brings me to tears. Unfortunately, the record was stolen from my dorm room and I don’t believe Sony has released it on CD.
  19. Hell, I wished that I looked that good EVER! My dad looked like a movie star when he was young, but I, unfortunately, did not inherit his great looks. I inherited my mom’s mediocre looks, with a dash of the “ugly stick” thrown in for good measure..
  20. About Bing’s personality. In the hills behind Stanford University, there used to be a “road house” that was, originally, a stage coach stop In the 1850’s. I can’t recall what they called the place, but I used to go there when I first moved to the Palo Alto CA area. They had cheap beer, and you could always find a stimulating conversation there as it was a hangout for Stanford students. One Friday evening, a friend and I were in there, and we noticed a gaggle of people gathered in a knot all around the bar. I couldn’t tell what the fascination was, but in the center of it all, I saw the top of
  21. I agree about Ella and Sarah Vaughan. I also loved to hear Dinah Washington sing. She was “unforgettable”. Well, Tony Bennett May have had a better singing voice than Sinatra, but Sinatra’s talent was in his phrasing and the way he “wrapped his voice around a lyric”. And all I have to say about Louis Armstrong is that he was a National Treasure.
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