Jump to content
IGNORED

Can anyone advise on how to connect these components?


Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

First time poster, long time lurker :)

 

I am interested in purchasing the below components but cannot figure out how to connect them all. A few have told me to connect 'in parallel' but I have searched all over Google and cannot find a clear definition of what the means or how it would apply to these units (most of the information seems to relate to car audio). Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

 

Amp:

NAD C 316BEE Stereo integrated amplifier at Crutchfield.com

 

Sub:

http://www.svsound.com/subwoofers/sealed-box/sb-1000

 

DAC:

http://schiit.com/products/bifrost

Link to comment
Hi all,

 

First time poster, long time lurker :)

 

I am interested in purchasing the below components but cannot figure out how to connect them all. A few have told me to connect 'in parallel' but I have searched all over Google and cannot find a clear definition of what the means or how it would apply to these units (most of the information seems to relate to car audio). Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

 

Amp:

NAD C 316BEE Stereo integrated amplifier at Crutchfield.com

 

Sub:

SVS SB-1000 | Home Theater Sealed Box Subwoofer

 

DAC:

Schiit Audio, Headphone amps and DACs made in USA.

 

These can be connected but you need to tell us what else there is in this system.

Kal Rubinson

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

 

Link to comment
Hi all,

 

First time poster, long time lurker :)

 

I am interested in purchasing the below components but cannot figure out how to connect them all. A few have told me to connect 'in parallel' but I have searched all over Google and cannot find a clear definition of what the means or how it would apply to these units (most of the information seems to relate to car audio). Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

 

Amp:

NAD C 316BEE Stereo integrated amplifier at Crutchfield.com

 

Sub:

SVS SB-1000 | Home Theater Sealed Box Subwoofer

 

DAC:

Schiit Audio, Headphone amps and DACs made in USA.

 

 

The amp has, on its back apron, a bunch of user-selectable inputs consisting of pairs of right-and-left 'RCA'-type jacks. Each of these will be color-coded (red for right, white for left) and grouped as to function by the silk-screened graphics and lettering around them. The analog output of the DAC can be connected via RCA-to-RCA interconnect (cables) via any of the inputs on the Amp that you choose, because in this model, all inputs are line level. There are are NO phono inputs on this amp, but is designated "disc" you would need an outboard phono preamp in order to connect all but a couple of turntables (those which have the phono preamp built-into them).

 

The subwoofers that you have chosen, will work with this amp. However, the amp has no subwoofer outputs, and you can't use the "Tape Out" connectors on the back of your amp for this function because they have a fixed output level which stays the same regardless of the amp's volume setting. Believe me, this is not what you want! In this case you will have to run another pair of speaker cables either from the speaker terminals on the back of the amp (giving you two cables on each channel. One would go to the speaker terminals on each speaker, of course, but the other would go to the speaker terminals on the subwoofer, or, as the few have told you, in parallel with your main speakers). It might be more convenient (shorter runs, etc.) to connect the cables going to the subwoofer directly to your main speakers along with the cables from the amp, it doesn't matter, electrically, they are essentially, the same point. I'm sure the directions that come with the subwoofer will show you a graphic depiction of how to connect the subwoofer to your speakers in either configuration.

 

I hope you have found this rather short explanation helpful.

George

Link to comment
The amp has, on its back apron, a bunch of user-selectable inputs consisting of pairs of right-and-left 'RCA'-type jacks. Each of these will be color-coded (red for right, white for left) and grouped as to function by the silk-screened graphics and lettering around them. The analog output of the DAC can be connected via RCA-to-RCA interconnect (cables) via any of the inputs on the Amp that you choose, because in this model, all inputs are line level. There are are NO phono inputs on this amp, but is designated "disc" you would need an outboard phono preamp in order to connect all but a couple of turntables (those which have the phono preamp built-into them).

 

The subwoofers that you have chosen, will work with this amp. However, the amp has no subwoofer outputs, and you can't use the "Tape Out" connectors on the back of your amp for this function because they have a fixed output level which stays the same regardless of the amp's volume setting. Believe me, this is not what you want! In this case you will have to run another pair of speaker cables either from the speaker terminals on the back of the amp (giving you two cables on each channel. One would go to the speaker terminals on each speaker, of course, but the other would go to the speaker terminals on the subwoofer, or, as the few have told you, in parallel with your main speakers). It might be more convenient (shorter runs, etc.) to connect the cables going to the subwoofer directly to your main speakers along with the cables from the amp, it doesn't matter, electrically, they are essentially, the same point. I'm sure the directions that come with the subwoofer will show you a graphic depiction of how to connect the subwoofer to your speakers in either configuration.

 

I hope you have found this rather short explanation helpful.

 

Your explanation was definitely helpful :). However, prepare for extreme amateur translation below.

 

So, you are saying that I can have two independent "outbound" connections from one of the amp's two L/R speaker outputs (with one split end going to a loudspeaker and the other split end going to the subwoofer)?

 

Which, then, of the amp's two available L/Rs should I choose for this initial setup, and which speaker would it go to first? How does the remaining speaker fit in?

 

And, from a technical standpoint, is it as simple as inserting both speaker wire ends into the same hole on the same cylindrical tube and then tightening it back up again? I guess I thought it was some type of electrical hazard to 'couple' connections from any single output, or likewise into a single input.

Link to comment
Your explanation was definitely helpful :). However, prepare for extreme amateur translation below.

 

So, you are saying that I can have two independent "outbound" connections from one of the amp's two L/R speaker outputs (with one split end going to a loudspeaker and the other split end going to the subwoofer)?

 

That's correct. Essentially, you will have two speaker runs connected to each pair of outputs (Left Plus and Minus, and Right Plus and Minus) One run will got to your main speakers, the other to the subwoofer. It's called connecting the two speakers (main and subwoofer) in parallel. Since you have only one subwoofer, the bass is "summed" (left + right) at the subwoofer so that it reproduces the bass from both channels. This is based on the traditional wisdom that bass sounds below 200-250 Hz are non-directional. So it really doesn't matter where in the room the low bass comes from, the higher overtones of the bass signal will come from either the right or the left main speaker thus locating the source of the bass either right, left, or center, irrespective of the actual physical location of the subwoofer. I happen to believe that stereo bass is better irrespective of the "traditional wisdom", and would heartily recommend that you save your shekels to buy a second subwoofer when you can. I feel that the improvement in bass clarity and directionality is worth it. Others here might disagree. Certainly, a single sub for both channels is better than no subwoofer at all! :)

 

Which, then, of the amp's two available L/Rs should I choose for this initial setup, and which speaker would it go to first? How does the remaining speaker fit in?

 

 

Looking at the back panel of this amp:

 

 

NAD 316.jpg

 

You will see that there is but ONE pair of outputs on this amp (Figure 7): Left + and - as well as Right + and -. Two speaker cables need to be connected to each of this pair. One cable of each output goes to each main speaker, and the other cable from each output goes to the corresponding input of the subwoofer. You can connect the subwoofer cables at either the amplifier end of the main speaker cables or at the speaker ends; whichever is most convenient. If I were doing what you are attempting, I'd try to put the sub halfway between the right and left main speakers.

 

And, from a technical standpoint, is it as simple as inserting both speaker wire ends into the same hole on the same cylindrical tube and then tightening it back up again? I guess I thought it was some type of electrical hazard to 'couple' connections from any single output, or likewise into a single input.

 

You'd be better off terminating the cables with spade lugs, then stacking the spades under the binding post screw-down finger nuts. Be careful to make sure that the wires or connectors going to the + outputs never touch the wires or connectors going to the - outputs. For that reason, I suggest that you terminate all the speaker cables with spade terminals.

 

AWG10_spades.jpg

 

Loose strands of bare wire tightened under the connector finger screws can all too easily "stray" over from the + terminal to the - terminal causing a short circuit. This will damage your amplifier and so is to be avoided at all costs. I would suggest that you buy your speaker cables already made-up but a look on the internet shows that the only speaker cables available already terminated with spade lugs are MUCH too costly for your budget system. (DO NOT spend a lot of money on cables, even if you, like many who post here, believe in cable sound, the equipment you have would simply not benefit from cables costing more than a few dollars each). For speaker cable, I'd recommend going to your local home and garden center and buying sufficient lengths of 14 Ga or 12 Ga lamp cord. Don't buy anything smaller than 14 Ga however (the smaller the number, the larger the wire) and then go to your local Radio Shack and buy your spade lugs and a pair of crimping pliars. You can probably buy your speaker wire there as well, but make sure it's 14 Ga at least (remember that 16 Ga is smaller than 14 Ga and 12 Ga is bigger). Get fairly large spade lugs so as to have plenty of room to stack them under the connector nuts on the amp, your main speakers and your subwoofers. A better solution would be to buy speaker cables terminated in stackable banana plugs, but again, unless you make your own, these are difficult to come by, especially at reasonable prices.

 

Don't you have a friend who is reasonably familiar with electronics and audio who can help you with this stuff? If so, get him to help you.

George

Link to comment

Thanks gmgraves for that exceptional response. I think I get it now.

 

And unfortunately none of my friends are into this stuff, despite being in our late 20s/early 30s. They listen to and appreciate music like anyone else, but none are what you'd call an audiophile.

 

In any event, feel free to point me toward the higher priced plugs that you were talking about, as I'd rather have the peace of mind that they were professionally terminated, banana plugged or what have you.

 

Lastly, if I'm envisioning this correctly, how do I get two banana plugged connections going from *one* amp output terminal, for example Left speaker minus?

Link to comment
Lastly, if I'm envisioning this correctly, how do I get two banana plugged connections going from *one* amp output terminal, for example Left speaker minus?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Dayton-Audio-BADP-GBK-Banana-Black/dp/B0002KR21I

 

Gold-Plated Dual Banana Plug : Banana Plugs | RadioShack.com

 

There are other styles but this is an easy way to start.

Positive emotions enhance our musical experiences.

 

Synology DS213+ NAS -> Auralic Vega w/Linear Power Supply -> Auralic Vega DAC (Symposium Jr rollerball isolation) -> XLR -> Auralic Taurus Pre -> XLR -> Pass Labs XA-30.5 power amplifier (on 4" maple and 4 Stillpoints) -> Hawthorne Audio Reference K2 Speakers in MTM configuration (Symposium Jr HD rollerball isolation) and Hawthorne Audio Bass Augmentation Baffles (Symposium Jr rollerball isolation) -> Bi-amped w/ two Rythmic OB plate amps) -> Extensive Room Treatments (x2 SRL Acoustics Prime 37 diffusion plus key absorption and extensive bass trapping) and Pi Audio Uberbuss' for the front end and amplification

Link to comment

Thanks Inferno. However, these look to be coupled designs. Unless I'm mistaken (which is entirely possible), I'm trying to get two banana plugs coming out of one amp terminal (for example, L red minus). I imagine this would be some type of Y-formation..no? Again, I could be wrong on what's needed here!

 

Edit: Something like this perhaps? http://www.amazon.com/RadioShack-274-734-Stackable-Banana-Package/dp/B004IS7KV2 Though, I am unsure of the difference or advantages between 'stackable banana plugs' vs a simple Y-adapter.

Link to comment
Thanks gmgraves for that exceptional response. I think I get it now.

 

And unfortunately none of my friends are into this stuff, despite being in our late 20s/early 30s. They listen to and appreciate music like anyone else, but none are what you'd call an audiophile.

 

They don't need to be audiophiles, necessarily, just someone handy with electrical stuff. This is very elementary, but it can be daunting if you have no experience with it.

 

In any event, feel free to point me toward the higher priced plugs that you were talking about, as I'd rather have the peace of mind that they were professionally terminated, banana plugged or what have you.

 

By "higher priced", I'm saying hundreds and maybe thousands of dollars for a pair of 8 ft speaker cables terminated in spade lugs. Believe me, you simply don't need (or want) to spend that kind of money on wire for a system in this price range. If you can't find a friend (or even a neighborhood kid!) to make-up these cables for you, then buy the wire and the connectors as I explained earlier, and take them to a TV repair shop and ask one of the technicians to make them up for you. You'll have to pay for the labor, but it's cheaper than these expensive, prepared cables from high-end audio sources. Maybe someone else here can point you to a company that can supply reasonably priced made-up speaker cables terminated with spade lugs or stackable banana plugs, because I couldn't find any - not even at Amazon everything started at around $200 and went up from there.You can make perfectly adequate speaker cables for less than $20 fer crissake!

 

Lastly, if I'm envisioning this correctly, how do I get two banana plugged connections going from *one* amp output terminal, for example Left speaker minus?

 

With stackable Banana Plugs:

 

This figure shows how the speaker wire connects to them with "set" screws down inside the "wells" of the female receptacles above the wire holes.

images.jpeg

 

Notice how they "mate" together? You can plug one into the back of the other for stickability!

 

20Pcs-lot-Screw-font-b-Type-b-font-Dual-font-b-Banana-b-font-font-b.jpg

 

Unfortunately, the solutions that Inferno suggested are NOT stackable, and if you are to parallel your subwoofer with your regular speakers, you need to connect two speaker cables to each of your right and your left amplifier speaker terminals. This means that spade lugs or stackable bananas are about your only options. Or, you could go with one connection using spade lugs and the second with just regular bananas:

 

http://www.parts-express.com/wired-home-bsk14g15-14-awg-banana-speaker-cable-15-ft--181-442

George

Link to comment

George,

 

Your assistance is very helpful so far. However, may I ask if it might be a better option for me to consider a different integrated amp with a dedicated subwoofer output..? Anything somewhat slimline with tone controls (bass/treble) and under $1000 would be preferable. If you have any suggestions please feel free to share. Thanks!

Link to comment
George,

 

Your assistance is very helpful so far. However, may I ask if it might be a better option for me to consider a different integrated amp with a dedicated subwoofer output..? Anything somewhat slimline with tone controls (bass/treble) and under $1000 would be preferable. If you have any suggestions please feel free to share. Thanks!

 

Do you already have the NAD? If so, I'd keep it and run it the way George suggested. If you don't and are looking to put a system together, do you already have the DAC?

 

If you do not already have a DAC, the Cambridge Audio Azur 651A, although discontinued, is still available on Amazon. It has more power than the NAD, a USB DAC included, and a dedicated subwoofer out:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cambridge-Audio-651A-CAMBRIDGE-BLACK/dp/B006IC50Q8

 

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
George,

 

Your assistance is very helpful so far. However, may I ask if it might be a better option for me to consider a different integrated amp with a dedicated subwoofer output..? Anything somewhat slimline with tone controls (bass/treble) and under $1000 would be preferable. If you have any suggestions please feel free to share. Thanks!

 

 

That certainly would make your situation easier. Then all you would need is a pair of RCA plug-to-RCA plug interconnects of the correct length. These can be really reasonable at only a few dollars each from a seller such as mycablemart.com.

George

Link to comment

Thanks all. I took a look at the Cambridge Audio Azur 651A per davidbeinct's link and it looks like a pretty solid unit, however there is one reviewer who absolutely hates the thing but I guess you can't please everyone. Is Cambridge a pretty good make? I understand they are UK-based with rather mixed feelings toward them but I can't imagine the unit would be a bad one for my usage scenario.

 

There's also the NAD C 326BEE with a Pre Out, which I'm considering. Not as slimline as I had hoped but I suppose that's a small price to pay (figuratively speaking). It's also the amplifier suggested in the setup that I'm going for in this article, called "The Timmy Ho".

Link to comment

UPDATE: It also occured to me that I can simply choose an alternate subwoofer as a way to eliminate the need for any advanced wiring (or, what I see as advanced).

 

The subwoofer I was looking at is this: SVS SB-1000 | Home Theater Sealed Box Subwoofer, however, it has only high level speaker level input, but not output.

 

I called Crutchfield for the heck of it who recommended the Definitive ProSub 1000, which has both of the above mentioned connections. Not really a fan of the looks, as shallow as that sounds, but I can probably live with it.

 

In any event, is choosing a different subwoofer a viable option? And if so, any other recommendations in a similar price range?

Link to comment
UPDATE: It also occured to me that I can simply choose an alternate subwoofer as a way to eliminate the need for any advanced wiring (or, what I see as advanced).

 

The subwoofer I was looking at is this: SVS SB-1000 | Home Theater Sealed Box Subwoofer, however, it has only high level speaker level input, but not output.

 

I called Crutchfield for the heck of it who recommended the Definitive ProSub 1000, which has both of the above mentioned connections. Not really a fan of the looks, as shallow as that sounds, but I can probably live with it.

 

In any event, is choosing a different subwoofer a viable option? And if so, any other recommendations in a similar price range?

 

 

The only difference, connection-wise, between this sub and the SVS that you originally chose, is that the woofer goes in series with your main speakers instead of in parallel with them. This means that you can have one pair of speaker cables going from your amp to the subwoofer first, and then to your main speakers from there. This has the advantage for you, of allowing you to use the following speaker cables (you'll need two pair).

 

Wired Home BSK14G15 14 AWG Banana Speaker Cable 15 ft.

 

Now, these cables are terminated in banana plugs (you don't need stackable with this sub). Just plug 'em in and go!

 

They come in different lengths:

 

catalog # 181-440 is a 6 footer and is $12.85 each

 

catalog # 181-441 is a 10 footer and is $16.17 each

 

catalog # 181-442 (detailed in the URL, above) is a 15 footer and is $20.51 each.

 

There is also a 25 footer, but that's too long, I'm sure.

 

Decide how far from your amp you want to place the subwoofer (for best quality, place halfway between your L and R speakers. For the most prodigious bass, place near a room corner. there will be more bass in this configuration, but it won't be as good quality.) and buy a pair (they seem to come only one per package, so buy two of everything) of the right length. Then measure from the subwoofer to your main speakers and buy the length that is closest to your measurement. Remember that it is better to buy a bit too long, than a bit too short, but keep all cables as short as possible; and remember also, to buy pairs the same length. Just because 1 speaker ends up only 4 feet from the subwoofer and the other is 9 ft from the subwoofer, resist the temptation to buy a six footer and a 10 footer for this installation. Buy two 10 footers. Also, don't forget to figure-in routing distance in that length measurement. The cables might lay on the floor and go straight to each component, but the amplifier is up on a shelf, and the speaker connectors are up, off the floor, on the back. allow for that.

 

I give you these tips, because, believe me in the more than 50 years that I've been an audiophile, I've been caught-out by every one of these caveats at one time or another. Good luck and enjoy!

George

Link to comment

George,

 

Awesome response yet again. Getting a more universally compatible subwoofer seems like the way to go here. I believe I understand the wiring schematics better this time around as well.

 

Wondering if you had any subwoofer recommendations for me to weigh in addition to the Definitive that Crutchfield recommended. There are some Polks available with the same compatibility but I'm a little apprehensive about the Polk name, as it reminds me of Best Buy.

 

Polk Audio PSW108 Powered subwoofer at Crutchfield.com

Polk Audio DSW PRO 550wi Powered subwoofer at Crutchfield.com

 

Thanks again!

Link to comment

In your first post you list a Schiit Bifrost. Switch amps, switch subwoofers, but don't switch out your Bifrost. I'm a huge Bifrost fan (I've got two,) especially with the Uber upgrade. It's well worth the money.

Family Room: Panny TCP65S2, Panny BDP-55, DTV HR-24, SB Touch, Schiit Bifrost Multibit, Yamaha RX-V3900, Emotiva XPA-3, Rocket NM 550's, Rocket 150's, X-CS, UFW-10, Harmony 700.

 

Computer Room: Dell laptop, Uptone Regen Amber, Schiit Bifrost Multibit, Decware SE84C+, Zu Omen, ALO National, Mr.Speakers Mad Dog headphones

Link to comment
George,

 

Awesome response yet again. Getting a more universally compatible subwoofer seems like the way to go here. I believe I understand the wiring schematics better this time around as well.

 

Wondering if you had any subwoofer recommendations for me to weigh in addition to the Definitive that Crutchfield recommended. There are some Polks available with the same compatibility but I'm a little apprehensive about the Polk name, as it reminds me of Best Buy.

 

Polk Audio PSW108 Powered subwoofer at Crutchfield.com

Polk Audio DSW PRO 550wi Powered subwoofer at Crutchfield.com

 

Thanks again!

 

 

Not really. I have a pair of Athena subs that I've had for years. I find them a perfect match for my Martin Logan Vistas, and really haven't kept up with subwoofer technology since then. I don't mind helping neophytes such as yourself get your "sea legs' WRT the audio hobby because we need new blood and I'm happy to help. But not knowing anything about you or your musical tastes and requirements, I'll just stick to helping you procedurally rather than make specific equipment recommendations.

George

Link to comment

Thanks George, you've definitely been helpful.

 

I think I have effectively narrowed it down to the below two sets:

 

  • NAD C 316BEE + either the Definitive or Polk sub
  • NAD C 326BEE (incl pre out) + SVS SB 1000

I am very partial to the form factor of the 316, however I suppose the less geometrically appealing form of the 326 isn't necessarily a dealbreaker.

 

However just curious if you happened to have any thoughts on those Polks above? Or, any other options with both speaker level in and out? Then, I should be able to stop bothering you.

 

EDIT: You also asked about musical tastes. Well, I listen to everything from ambient to doo wop to electronic to soul to r&b to indie rock and nearly everything in between. Yes, it's safe to say I really do listen to everything, however more electronic than usual lately.

 

I can appreciate good bass notes but I don't need (nor would I be looking for) anything that will rattle the windows and potentially drown out the other frequencies.

Link to comment
Thanks George, you've definitely been helpful.

 

I think I have effectively narrowed it down to the below two sets:

 

  • NAD C 316BEE + either the Definitive or Polk sub
  • NAD C 326BEE (incl pre out) + SVS SB 1000

I am very partial to the form factor of the 316, however I suppose the less geometrically appealing form of the 326 isn't necessarily a dealbreaker.

 

However just curious if you happened to have any thoughts on those Polks above? Or, any other options with both speaker level in and out? Then, I should be able to stop bothering you.

 

EDIT: You also asked about musical tastes. Well, I listen to everything from ambient to doo wop to electronic to soul to r&b to indie rock and nearly everything in between. Yes, it's safe to say I really do listen to everything, however more electronic than usual lately.

 

I can appreciate good bass notes but I don't need (nor would I be looking for) anything that will rattle the windows and potentially drown out the other frequencies.

 

 

I have no experience with Polk products, so I can't comment. I also don't know what kind of music "ambient" or "doo wop" are, having never seen or heard the terms before. I do know what soul, R&B and conceptually, what "indie Rock" is (although I wouldn't recognize it if I heard it). My musical tastes run heavily to classical, some jazz, and when I'm slumming, I like Celtic and traditional Appalachian folk music. I'm also fond of symphonic film scores from the golden age of Hollywood. I know nothing about pop music or rock or rap or country-western, or any such musical forms.

George

Link to comment
I've long suspected it, but now I KNOW you're from another planet. Here's your first lesson:

 

 

 

Oh, you mean that late 50's rock? I had forgotten that style of singing was called doo wop. I still don't know what is meant by "ambient", though.

 

And, please don't spread it around that I'm an alien. We aren't ready to take over yet. When we do, you can rest assured that folks who don't like the same kinds of music that we like, will be....uh...shall we say....taken care of? :)

George

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...