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External vibrations while burning a CD - does it cause errors if it's minor?


belfast
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Curious about this, because it's potentially a bigger problem than what external vibrations will do to playback.

 

I've got a late 2010 Macbook Pro laptop with a built-in burner - still works great - and I usually have it on a stable desk when burning a CD at home. Floor's pretty stable in this room - i.e. it doesn't creak or make a noise when you walk over it, it's pretty solid, with linoleum over it.

 

On the other side of the wall is main entrance to the building and once in a while one that heavy door can be heard pretty well closing shut. It doesn't rattle the desk, but I'm wondering if I should be concerned of any vibrations coming in and potentially causing read errors? The desk isn't touching the wall, so we're talking about residual vibrations that would have to travel through the floor and up the desk and of course through the laptop chassis to the burning unit. A non-concern for 99% of people burning stuff on a CD, but if one is trying to do the most accurate burn possible, I'm wondering if it will negative impact this? Verification will find no errors, but is this because the burner has done something to "correct" an error that's been caused during the writing process? OR is there something about the way a computer burns a CD that negates any potential error writing?

 

(FWIW, moving the computer to another room isn't much of an option because usually a roommate or two will be in there walking around or doing something.)

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nothing to worry about in my opinion. there's not enough there to make a difference. now if the desk was shaking then that might be another matter.

sources:  intel nuc8i7 (audiolinux, roon core) (server) | simaudio moon mind 2 (renderer)
headphone rig:  chord qutest > bryston bha-1 > audeze lcd-3
main rig:  chord dave > parasound jc5 > kef reference 1
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  • 1 month later...

I took my Macbook Pro to work today and while I was burning a disc, someone decides to repeatedly knock on the table it was one - hard enough that I can see other objects on the table shaking a bit, and an inch away from the internal burner itself.

 

It finished the burn, but I did not have verification on, so I wasn't able to verify the burn. Is it a given that the person's actions basically created some errors?

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You should only do it at home, with your special audiophile burner (you have one don't you?) and your computer sitting in a massive granite platform, which is itself mounted on spikes on a solid concrete floor.  It has to be level too.  Make sure to put 10 vibrapods under both the computer and the burner, along with cable risers for the USB, which also has to be audiophile grade...

No electron left behind...

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1 hour ago, belfast said:

I took my Macbook Pro to work today and while I was burning a disc, someone decides to repeatedly knock on the table it was one - hard enough that I can see other objects on the table shaking a bit, and an inch away from the internal burner itself.

 

It finished the burn, but I did not have verification on, so I wasn't able to verify the burn. Is it a given that the person's actions basically created some errors?

No it is not a given.  It is not likely.  If you were copying musical tracks you could do a checksum on each track and see if the checksums match from the original file. If they do then no errors.

 

Not a Mac user myself so maybe one who is can suggest a good software for checksums.

And always keep in mind: Cognitive biases, like seeing optical illusions are a sign of a normally functioning brain. We all have them, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, but it is something that affects our objective evaluation of reality. 

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