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Spanna

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  1. I don’t understand why you think it’s not possible, given that you’ve stated: “(If) the phase relationships of the fundamental and harmonics are altered, everything from perceived pitch to timbre can change.” “Along with their phase relationships, variations in the strength and frequency of harmonics can affect the perceived fundamental pitch.” This suggests to me that our perception of pitch is good enough for us to detect a change in pitch due to a change in 1) the phase relationships of the fundamental and its harmonics, and 2) the strength and
  2. Bluesman, I’m obviously not explaining myself very well. I’m purely referring to the sound we hear in our listening room and not anything to do with the musicians, their instruments or the recording process. I’m asking if it’s possible that, because: “(If) the phase relationships of the fundamental and harmonics are altered, everything from perceived pitch to timbre can change.” “Along with their phase relationships, variations in the strength and frequency of harmonics can affect the perceived fundamental pitch.” we could use the con
  3. There’s research to suggest that non-trained listeners can hear the effect of harmonics being adjusted in frequency, and they describe hearing either a change in pitch or the sound just not sounding “right”. The hypothesis is that our ears perform an FFT which allows us to detect a change in a harmonics frequency and amplitude. Would you agree then that by listening to the way two two components reproduce the apparent tunefulness of a piano sonata we can get an indication of how accurately the fundamental and its harmonics relate to one another, with the most tuneful components also b
  4. I was fortunate to grow up in a musical home and would often listen to music played on a baby grand, an upright and Spanish guitar. Now, if I listen to a recording of a piano sonata and make a change to the system I nearly always detect a change in the way the system appears to reproduce the pitches of the notes. I also find that the more accurate the reproduction of pitch appears to be, the closer the recording sounds to the sound of a real instrument, rather than a strange sort of unnatural representation, hence my original question. You appear to be talking about musicians being o
  5. “If the phase relationships of the fundamental and harmonics are altered, everything from perceived pitch to timbre can change.” “Along with their phase relationships, variations in the strength and frequency of harmonics can affect the perceived fundamental pitch.” Would you agree that we could use the converse of this and listen to the perceived pitch to give us an indication of how accurately the fundamental and its harmonics relate to one another, with the most pitch accurate components also being the most musically accurate components?
  6. I don’t think it matters what the original sounded like. As long as what I’m hearing sounds harmonious and pleasant with no distracting “nasties”, I really don’t mind how the music is packaged or delivered to me.
  7. David @ Qobuz, I listen to Qobuz on a Linn DS. Is it possible for Linn to add a sort function so I can see my favourites in artist order (rather than the order in which they were added), or would Qobuz have to add the function first?
  8. What is the latest on the Linn app being able to sort Qobuz favourites, rather than the list being presented only in the order in which they were added?
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