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57gold

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  1. FD - No doubt John's vocal is the real deal. Have missed JB, in spite of buying several of his albums since the 1970s. IMO there are a bunch of guitarists (my personal focus as a player) who "needed" good songs and bands for them to perform their best. Examples might include EVH, Robben Ford, Eric Johnson...guitarists that can elevate a great song to a higher level, but require great bands and singers to achieve this, but had to be the "star" as opposed to the leader of a band. On this one, great song, great band, decent singer give JB the platform to c
  2. Buddy sent me a link to this. Knew I was a longtime fan, back the the 1970s when he played great songs with strong bands. To me, this performance is up there with classic JB. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MA_trAwSP00 Not saying that his performances in concert or say on Ronnie Scott's live recording are anything but stellar, just that all the best tunes are decades old. This is new, great song (John's), great band and JB lifting the tune to a new level. Cool work for an old dude.
  3. Have enjoyed tremendously owning and playing music for @20 years through a McCormack DNA-500 driving a pair of Aerial 10Ts, which "woke up" with the 900 watts into 4 ohms versus some whopper mono tube amps (8 KT88s per side) that preceded it in this challenge. Took Steve McCormack's advice and replaced external fuse with a Furutech one and like what it did to the sonics, remember increased transparency and depth versus the stock generic fuse. Spent the $s because did/do not believe that he is a snake oil promoter and, quite frankly, there was nothing motivating his recommendatio
  4. A few months back, contacted Purifi and they stated that they had no immediate plans for a release of more powerful modules. Has that changed?
  5. Numbers don't lie, it's just your imagination or biases or subjectiveness leading you to that delusion. Did you do a statistically significant double blind test? Seriously, maybe the tests did not include the headphone output circuit.
  6. Interesting, understand that Mytek's "improved" analog volume on Brooklyn+ adds some distortion to "warm up" the sonics. ASR disliked that feature, as opposed to just recommending users to stick to "cleaner" digital volume control.
  7. FWIW, and based upon the rather contentious AS thread on ASR, some would say it's not worth much or it is, the Okto Stereo has the highest score of all DACs tested on the boil it down to one performance number category. Not sure what that number means other than ASR calc it based upon low distortion and dynamics, but I could be wrong about that as I don't understand all these tests, charts, graphs... But even the nice folks at Stereophile, who do their own tests, charts and graphs, say it sound fine and state: "Okto's dac8 Stereo performed supremely well on the test bench."
  8. I'd look at this with streamer add on: https://www.oktoresearch.com/ See review on Stereophile, kept up with a $10K+ unit.
  9. Wonder if AS readers have found ASR recommendations, like DACs that rank high on the ASR boil it down to one number scale, that sound bad or weak? The Okto, Mola Mola, Gustard and Matrix units at the top of their scale seem to have some fans here.
  10. Never compared EC's playing to Miles, only speculated on why EC didn't hear himself in EVH. The comparisons were Miles to Coltrane and EC to EVH. EC's nickname was Slowhand and EVH was anything but that.
  11. Clapton created his voice by assimilating blues harmony and melodies into his early playing and then incorporating it into rock/pop tunes that he recorded and performed over the rest of his career. Even his borrowed reggae hit and the cool clip of him playing a few pages back, exemplifies this approach, reggae changes and rhythm with EC playing minor blues lines for his intro and solo breaks. The Layla album does have a few blues tunes: Nobody Knows, Key to the Highway, Have You Ever Loved a Woman, and It's Too Late are all 100% blues forms, but they make up less than half the a
  12. Never heard of John Martyn, thanks for posting these links. A very musical cat who seems to have been a ground breaking user of tape loop, which like everything else has been digitalized these days. Thought we might be related, as my great grandmother was a Martyn, but alas it's a stage name.
  13. Jeff is an original player, riding the whammy bar to the max, and very musical cat. Since 1976's Wired, have had no use for his studio albums. I bought them all with great anticipation... To me, he has needed a great band like the ones he recorded with up to that point with members with songwriting skills. My guess is that he wanted to be the frontman, a position that is hard to maintain if you don't sing. To this day, the highlights of his shows are covers of other peoples tunes, mostly old catalogue, like the very fine performance, Live at Ronnie Scott's. Shame that
  14. firedog, IMO there are no universal "bests". Clearly, EC was a "great" and innovative guitarist in the world of rock 1966-1971. Decent singer/songwriter since, whose playing never advanced from his great period and the whole world borrowed his stuff, which in part he borrowed from US blues players. Julian and company above are great guitarists. They all communicate and emote deeply, but everyone is not receptive to what they play and their jazz language. Getting "there" is a different spot for different people. My kids have gifted me some new music tha
  15. 1966-1971 EC was a key member of the rock n' roll pantheon of guitar gods, which included Jimi, Pagey, Duane, Jeff, David Gilmour...based upon their contributions to the music at that time. As guitarists, none of them were nor are master musicians, like Julian Lage, or John Scofield, or George Benson, or Wes, or Mike Stern... Players active today who are masters of the electric blues/rock vernacular that EC led in the late 1960s include Matt Schofield, John Mayer, Robben Ford, Derek Trucks, Joey Landreth, Eric Gales, Marcus King, Robert Cray, Joe Bonamassa...
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