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Hadox

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  1. OK, I have been through step-by-step and definitely didn't do anything that wasn't on the instructions - didn't power off during firmware installation, only after the pop-up window notification that firmware update had failed, following transfer increment stalling. With the XMOS evaluation driver installed, USB Audio Device Control Panel shows firmware v1.01 installed. I couldn't get the DAC to play with the eval driver installed, so I have uninstalled it. After many failed attempts, the Windows drivers have installed but Windows says the device is in use by another application, when I try and test it with the default Windows sound settings; no other applications are open. I can't get it to play in Foobar (Asio, Wasapi, KS, DS) nor in Tidal. I have swapped the shipped USB lead for a branded one I know works. Power supply is 5v iFi Audio iPower which is rated at 2.5A The DAC display panel is back up, but is unresponsive either by the front panel buttons or by the remote which has freshly charged batteries I know work. I've run out of options on the XMOS / Windows driver side - I can try and re-flash with Thesycon firmware and drivers but will wait for a response here first. These things happen.
  2. I realise what I've done - I think I interrupted a partial firmware update by powering off instead of repeating the steps as per the instructions. Is this recoverable at home?
  3. Hi, I was trying to check what version of XMOS firmware I was on - now Rev DAC is recognised by TUSB audio control panel but not in Windows Sound Settings and Rev DAC display is now off. Have tried Rev DAC power off / on with no success. Please advise. Firmware v1.01 Thanks, Haden
  4. Time Left: 13 days and 22 hours

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    Cantatis Overture 192 PCI Sound Card, in very good used condition. An older, PCI (not PCI-E) format card but very good. There is some online information about underclocking for those with a tinkering bent. Windows 10 drivers still available from manufacturer's website. 24-bit 192 kHz capability. SPDIF optical and coaxial outputs in addition to stereo RCA analogue outputs. Photos are of actual unit for sale. From manufacturer's website: "The first computer audio product to utilise DUAL Burr Brown PCM1794A Digital to Analogue converters in Dual Mono Mode bringing the power of one ultra-high quality advanced DAC to each audio channel, results in industry leading performance for hi-fi purists and professional audio users alike. High specification audiophile op-amps are used throughout the design, as is ultra-stable clocking circuitry giving incredibly low noise and minimally-low jitter stereo outputs comparable with the very best available, regardless of price. A specialist circuit using a Texas Instruments amplifier drives the headphone outputs to suit a very wide range of headphone types (30Ω to 600Ω) giving an exceptionally high dynamic range performance. Digital S/PDIF outputs, both optical (TOSLINK) and electrical (RCA) are provided, at, uniquely, up to the very full 192kHz sample rate to match professional audio equipment, giving certain system compatibility. High accuracy heavily filtered three stage linear on-board power supplies are utilised to minimise the adverse effects of low quality switch mode power supplies often used in PCs." Specification Outputs Analogue Headphone Dynamic range (A-weighted) 132 dB 124 dB Signal to Noise (A-weighted) 132 dB 125 dB THD+N @ VOUT = 0 dB < 0.0004% < 0.0005% Jitter < 75 pS < 75 pS Frequency response - 2Hz to 22kHz +/- 0.2 dB +/- 0.4 dB Device specifications noted above; performance within particular computers may differ slightly. Features Analogue outputs - nominal 2.3V rms on studio grade, gold plated RCA female connectors. Headphone Outputs - 3.5mm connector and on-board header for linking to computer front panel. Sample rates - 32kHz to 192kHz (automatic or user-selected including up-sampling). [NB - from what I remember automatic sample rate selection worked under Windows XP but not Windows 7. I don't know about Windows 10 - Hadox] Digital output S/PDIF - optical (TOSLINK) and co-axial (RCA) outputs at up to full 192kHz sampling rate. On-board expansion ports for additional audio outputs or inputs. PCI 2.2 and 2.3 compliant. WDM drivers for Microsoft Windows® 98SE, 2000, XP, Vista and Windows7, 8 and 10. For more information relating to Windows7, 8 and 10 see Support Questions. ASIO 2.0 compatible, with suitable software. Intuitive control panel software for ultimate ease of use. Easy and quick to install. Intuitive control application for ultimate ease of use.

    150.00 USD

  5. View Classified Cantatis Overture 192 PCI Sound Card Cantatis Overture 192 PCI Sound Card, in very good used condition. An older, PCI (not PCI-E) format card but very good. There is some online information about underclocking for those with a tinkering bent. Windows 10 drivers still available from manufacturer's website. 24-bit 192 kHz capability. SPDIF optical and coaxial outputs in addition to stereo RCA analogue outputs. [Stock photo. Photos of actual unit for sale to follow] From manufacturer's website: "The first computer audio product to utilise DUAL Burr Brown PCM1794A Digital to Analogue converters in Dual Mono Mode bringing the power of one ultra-high quality advanced DAC to each audio channel, results in industry leading performance for hi-fi purists and professional audio users alike. High specification audiophile op-amps are used throughout the design, as is ultra-stable clocking circuitry giving incredibly low noise and minimally-low jitter stereo outputs comparable with the very best available, regardless of price. A specialist circuit using a Texas Instruments amplifier drives the headphone outputs to suit a very wide range of headphone types (30Ω to 600Ω) giving an exceptionally high dynamic range performance. Digital S/PDIF outputs, both optical (TOSLINK) and electrical (RCA) are provided, at, uniquely, up to the very full 192kHz sample rate to match professional audio equipment, giving certain system compatibility. High accuracy heavily filtered three stage linear on-board power supplies are utilised to minimise the adverse effects of low quality switch mode power supplies often used in PCs." Specification Outputs Analogue Headphone Dynamic range (A-weighted) 132 dB 124 dB Signal to Noise (A-weighted) 132 dB 125 dB THD+N @ VOUT = 0 dB < 0.0004% < 0.0005% Jitter < 75 pS < 75 pS Frequency response - 2Hz to 22kHz +/- 0.2 dB +/- 0.4 dB Device specifications noted above; performance within particular computers may differ slightly. Features Analogue outputs - nominal 2.3V rms on studio grade, gold plated RCA female connectors. Headphone Outputs - 3.5mm connector and on-board header for linking to computer front panel. Sample rates - 32kHz to 192kHz (automatic or user-selected including up-sampling). [NB - from what I remember automatic sample rate selection worked under Windows XP but not Windows 7. I don't know about Windows 10 - Hadox] Digital output S/PDIF - optical (TOSLINK) and co-axial (RCA) outputs at up to full 192kHz sampling rate. On-board expansion ports for additional audio outputs or inputs. PCI 2.2 and 2.3 compliant. WDM drivers for Microsoft Windows® 98SE, 2000, XP, Vista and Windows7, 8 and 10. For more information relating to Windows7, 8 and 10 see Support Questions. ASIO 2.0 compatible, with suitable software. Intuitive control panel software for ultimate ease of use. Easy and quick to install. Intuitive control application for ultimate ease of use. Seller Hadox Date 07/24/20 Price 200.00 USD Category Digital to Analog Converters  
  6. That gigabyte mobo looks like just the job. I wasn't expecting to find a Mini ITX board with PCI, was expecting maybe Micro ATX. In stock at a number of UK suppliers too. Really helpful, thanks.
  7. Hi, I'm new to the forum but I've been tinkering away at the budget end of the file-playback and streaming spectrum for some years. I have a Cantatis Overture PCI soundcard gathering dust at home. As well as being an excellent dual-mono Burr Brown DAC in it's own right, it also has an SPDIF output which I am keen to use to feed my SPS DAC3 non-oversampling DAC, to see if this represents an improvement over USB input. My question is - might it be feasible to build a fanless PC with a PCI slot (not PCI-E)? Does anyone have any advice or am I on a hiding to nowhere with this idea? Thanks in advance.
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