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Mayfair

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About Mayfair

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  1. Hi Allan , The first paragraph of my comment reads: "I can enjoy a "bad" recording of a good performance, for example Artur Schnabel's Beethoven sonata cycle recorded in 1932-33, or Charlie Parker's Dial Sessions, recorded in 1946-47. I'd love if it their performances had been better recorded, but then I wouldn't be listening to Artur Schnabel or Charlie Parker. I try to "listen through" the recording to the performance - that's what "sounds good" to me..." I thought that tied in with "whether the playback of a bad recording can sound good from a sonic point of view." , if not, my apologies.
  2. I can enjoy a "bad" recording of a good performance, for example Artur Schnabel's Beethoven sonata cycle recorded in 1932-33, or Charlie Parker's Dial Sessions, recorded in 1946-47. I'd love if it their performances had been better recorded, but then I wouldn't be listening to Artur Schnabel or Charlie Parker. I try to "listen through" the recording to the performance - that's what "sounds good" to me. On the other hand, I can't enjoy a good recording of a bad performance.
  3. Stephen Hough's set ... just out and very, very good IMHO.
  4. That's what I generally do as well and also agree with @lucretius on @joshM's "Best Version of" series. In terms of research, I search the Hoffman forums and the Dynamic Range Database for non-jazz, non-classical releases then search Discogs to find the details of the particular release with the CD mastering I'm looking for. If in doubt I go for the oldest CD mastering on Discogs. (I'll also settle for "almost as good" if "the best" is considered some three $figure mid 1980s 1st Japanese release). For jazz I can sometimes find info on the Dynamic Range Database, but generally if in doubt I go for the oldest CD mastering on Discogs. For classical I search reviews and Discogs - it's generally a particular performer/performance I'm looking for, rather than the mastering. In terms of buying, sometimes I can find the title in a local used CD store. I've sometimes been lucky on download sites like Qobuz or 7digital for titles that have been released for download sale but that no one's bothered to remaster. Sometimes I can find the particular CD I'm looking for new or used on Amazon (though recently I've found that they seem to feature and sometimes only offer only the most recent release) but generally I search eBay until I find exactly what I'm looking for. Haven't tried ordering through Discogs. I've found out in practice that this can all take some time...
  5. IMHO, Lazar Berman with Claudio Abbado and the LSO
  6. I use JRiver Media Center to access and play my library remotely. It's easy to check whether I already have something I'm contemplating buying as a CD.
  7. Thanks for the Ray Brown tip - just bought the download on Presto Music for a price-I-couldn't-refuse. https://www.prestomusic.com/jazz/products/8631141--two-bass-hits
  8. Stunning imaging and "being-there" ambiance. Also liked the visual nod to Chaplin in the cover art and album title. Thanks again, Mario.
  9. I've listened to this collection a lot since it came out, and have found the sound quality excellent. I think Resonance Records did a top-drawer job on this one. I have the 16/44.1 kHz download version ('smatter of fact, I'm listening to "Don't Let That Moon Get Away" from 1939 right now). Dynamic Range (DR) on the tracks according to JRMC ranges from 9 to 17. It doesn't sound like it was recorded yesterday, but it sure sounds good to me. I've found it at least as good as the sound quality I've heard on tracks from the same era on the Duke Ellington Centennial Edition: Complete RCA Recordings. And, oh, yes... the music is fantastic! Hope that helps!
  10. Nothing depressing about Duke during the Depression. From 1932. https://www.qobuz.com/fr-fr/album/rose-room-duke-ellington/tzzrzk456u95b
  11. https://www.linnrecords.com/recording-henri-jacques-de-croes-la-sonate-egaree
  12. I don't know if this is what you're looking for, but for what it's worth, I have two versions of these performances: the 1995 Decca CD, and the 2015 Decca/DG Argerich box set retrospective, "Complete Recordings On Deutsche Grammophon". According to JRMC, they appear to be the same masterings: Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 3 The DRs in dB, (LU) on the respective works and movements of Rach 3 are: Rach 3: 13 (14.2); 13 (14.0); 13 (14.8) The respective peak levels, R128, (sample) are: Rach 3: 2.1 dBTP (2.1 dB); 0.0 dBTP (0.0 dB); -0.3 dBTP (-0.4 dB) Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 The DRs in dB, (LU) on the respective works and movements of Tchaikovsky 1 are: Tchaikovsky 1: 15 (21.8); 15 (18.3); 13 (16.6) The respective peak levels, R128, (sample) are: Tchaikovsky 1: -2.2 dBTP (-2.2 dB), -6.0 dBTP (-6 dB); +0.1 dBTP (-0.0 dB)
  13. @Mario Martinez Yes, please. Greatly appreciated.
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