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chichaz

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About chichaz

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  1. All true, but I'd rather leave everything in DHCP. I have too many devices to go around trying to assign fixed IPs to everything. Besides I find myself ripping SACDs maybe every three months now that my collection is ripped. If it takes me an extra 30s to locate the current IP address that's okay. OTOH I should make some BAT files to write DSF files, rather than splitting out my ISOs later on a different machine. Thanks for the recommendations. Thanks @NorthGeorgiaWX for reminding me to thank the people here who've discovered and refined these methods in the first place!
  2. Over the last two years or so I have read every post on these 187 pages. If you'll indulge me for a moment, I wanted to chime in with an update. I bought some SACDs on Discogs recently and ripped them last night, for backup purposes of course 👍. I had installed a wired gigabit switch in my entertainment center a few months ago. Now everything is just a little bit easier. Popped in my trusty (read: dedicated) flash drive into my Oppo, turned off auto-resume & looked at the IP address, inserted the first disc, connected an Ethernet cable I leave behind the cabinet to my laptop, edited the IP address in the sacd.cmd file, shelled out to DOS, changed the directory, typed "sacd" and blamo! While I realize this still takes several steps, it requires a maximum of five minutes. That's unless you make a mistake, and I admit I usually make one or two. I have to say, though, wired Ethernet and the dedicated flash drive are the keys to making this an easy process. Hope this helps anyone else who has successfully ripped a disc and hopes to do so again in the future. Cheers
  3. That's a good list for starters. However you've got a duplicate in Cambridge Audio units. #3 and #13 are the same. The full model name is Cambridge Audio Azur 752BD. The "CXU" is a completely different unit and is a duplicate of #16. It would help to group them by manufacturer.
  4. Certainly doing it this way is the most foolproof method of extracting ISOs. Since we're here, extracting the ISO file THEN converting it down to DSF or FLAC files later also keeps the process simple. Besides personal experience, 97 pages of this thread have shown this over and over again!
  5. Thank you to ted_b and all who contributed to the procedure! It's unbelievable (in a good way) I'm able to do something with all these SACDs I was stockpiling in the early 2000s. I first heard DSD in the studio during a Telarc session and was blown away. A big proponent of the high res audio movement early on, it eventually lost steam over the next several years as the format was mostly considered dead. Now the ability to rip and play directly on my 851N has only made me purchase many more! I have read every post (all 80 pages!) and feel like I deserve something for that. Anyway what I will do is reiterate a few recurring problems and answers to common questions to help those new to the process. Flash drive troubleshooting: You're sure you have the files correct on the flash drive, with the correct extensions and inside the autoscript folder yet it's still not working? Try another flash drive! My first one didn't work, but the second did. If the drawer doesn't pop open, it's time to try something else! There are many threads here with screenshots on what your autoscript folder should look like. There are several threads about the formatting of the flash drive. Use a PC to do this, or a PC emulator on Mac. Perhaps avoid large capacity drives. The autoscript folder takes up well under 1GB. Once you have the flash drive ready, connect a PC directly to your SACD player (you do not need a crossover cable). I used an older laptop I could leave setup in the living room for a few days. My wife didn't mind! Anyway use a TV to locate the IP address of the unit and modify the SACD.cmd script using Notepad to put in the correct IP address. Do NOT include any extra zeros. Then, continue with the instructions, getting out to terminal / DOS. Once you're in DOS navigate to the correct directory with all these files and type sacd.cmd to start the process. Don't forget Doskey, which allows you to use arrows to repeat text input just in case you make a goof getting to the right directory, etc. What if you don't know DOS? Keep reading... Put the SACD_extract folder in the root directory (C:\). Then here's the exact play by play: 1) Windows menu -> run command -> type "cmd" -> press enter 2) At the command prompt type cd:\ -> press enter this puts your directory at C:\ 3) Type CD \SACD_extract -> press enter 4) Now type sacd.cmd -> press enter After a few seconds the disc info will come up, then start copying the data to the same SACD_extract directory 5) When done you'll get the message, "We are done..." 6) Now you can pop out the disc, put in another, wait about 10 seconds and repeat steps 4-5 for all your SACDs. 7) When done, type exit -> press enter to get back to Windows What players work to extract SACDs? These are the ONLY known and confirmed-working units: Pioneer BDP-160 Pioneer BDP-170 Pioneer BDP-80FD Oppo 103, 103D Oppo 105, 105D Arcam UDP411 Arcam CDS 27 Cambridge Audio CXU None of these manufacturers have locked out the ripping capability yet. It's not likely they will but be cautious about upgrading your firmware just in case. If you're in a bigger city be sure to check craigslist for these players. I found a very inexpensive Oppo 103 (~$300) on Chicago craigslist to do this! Now that the 20x series of Oppo players are out, people are upgrading and selling off their 10x units. Cheers.
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