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bdiament

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About bdiament

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  1. Hi AnotherSpin, A hole in the board is a good idea. It eliminates the need for the straw too. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  2. Hi John, I don't believe a well-designed roller will "care" about the weight of the load. I have them under quite light DVD players and line stages, as well as under quite heavy amps, speakers, and subwoofers. My feeling is the less there is between the rollers and what they isolate, the less there is to isolate. Not a matter of weight but a matter of what there is to "shake." Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  3. Hi Dave, The "problem" here is that you are speaking from direct experience as opposed to not having any experience with this, theorizing a lot (often erroneously), and simply repeating what others have said as if you discovered it. Now who am I going to believe about how the water feels: Someone who has spent some good time swimming? Or someone who might have (or might not have) dipped their toe in once? ;-} My experience matches yours: the air bearing works well vertically and doesn't do much horizontally. To be clear, it might be more than zero in the horizontal plane but it i
  4. Hi sig8, The question becomes, is the tube as flexible and "loose" as it would be in its normal (valve facing inward) state? I would tend to think it is more "tight" with the valve outside, making it stiffer. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  5. Hi John, I believe your assumption makes sense. However, I've also found that isolation seems to work best when it is placed as close as possible to that which we wish to isolate. In this case, having tried (and currently using) both, I find giving "priority" to the rollers (i.e., the horizontal and rotational planes) to be sonically advantageous. Does this mean horizontal vibrations potentially do more damage than vertical ones? I don't know but I think this is a possibility. Another, perhaps stronger possibility is that there just happen to me more horizontal ones than vertical o
  6. Hi John, Are you using the rollers below the air bearing? If so, have you tried it the other way (shelf - air bearing - platform - rollers - component or tile-component)? The main thing is you are happy with the results. I wonder if reversing the setup (rollers on top) might make you even happier? Just a thought. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  7. Hi Dave, Understood about the floor. However, I still don't see this means vibrations in the floor are necessarily traveling vertically as opposed to horizontally. Not sure how this could best be measured. Probably have to look into how seismologists do it. (There's a job. I can imagine a kid somewhere saying: "When I grow up, I want to be a seismologist." ;-}) Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  8. Hi sig8, I'd leave the valve on the inside. As Dave rightly points out, there is less rubber on the inside of the circle than there is on the outside. A flexible valve extension helps with access. And yes, it *may* also provide enough of a gap to remove the need for the straw. However, it may also make for a bit of tilt. You would need to experiment to see. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  9. Hi Dave, I saw the post, then got distracted by some non-audio necessities (aka Life and the health of a loved one who was in the hospital for a heart operation). Also, I didn't really have much to say. I don't know that I would draw the same conclusions, i.e., that the vibrations were vertical in nature. Even if the subs are in direct contact with the floor (I'd consider "floating" them too. ;-}) and even if the floor is suspended on joists, I could be mistaken (of course) but I don't see why these would suggest the vibrations in the floor itself travel across the floor vertically
  10. Hi sig8, I'm at a loss to figure out why an 18" inner tube is describing a circle much more than 18". I'm using 18" x 1.75" inner tubes and they would appear to describe nothing larger than an outer diameter of 19" or a bit less. I have them under 20" x 20" platforms and the inner tubes stop a least 1/2" before the edge. I prefer to have the full surface of the inner tube covered, with nothing bulging beyond the edge of the platform. First thing I'd suggest is to ascertain whether those are in fact 18" inner tubes, or were perhaps mislabeled. If they are, and they describe a circle
  11. Hi Foggie, That is correct. I made two racks but each is single-wide -- the shelves can easily hold a component that is a bit over 20" wide by 20" deep and close to a foot tall. I made two because I wanted each component to have its own shelf. (However, the shelf with the power distribution block also has the power supply for the converters on it.) Excellent! It is always great to hear success stories from fellow music and audio enthusiasts. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  12. Hi Dave, Why assume the floor vibrations you felt were vertical? If the waves were moving horizontally along the floor, that *might* explain why the roller-isolated speakers did not respond. (It may *see* vertical if looking at a small, separate section of floor as the waves pass by. I don't know. Just speculating.) I don't know in which plane the floor vibrations were moving. The speakers are coupled to the floor in the vertical plane but isolated in the horizontal (and rotational) planes. Particularly in view of the speakers' non-response, I would ask "why assume they were ver
  13. Hi Jud, Sure! We can all ask for adjacent cells. And share basket weaving tips. ;-} Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  14. One thing to keep in mind is that once hardness is sufficient (to avoid denting, scoring, etc.), ringing becomes a consideration. So going for the hardness spec alone, much like going for *any* spec alone, can take one down a needless - and often wrong - path. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
  15. Hi 4est, Not sure about any claims of softness for marble. I've had marble tiles under heavy Magnepan 3.6s, 3.7s, and 3.7i's, under heavy power amplifiers, and under much heavier subwoofers for many years, with no issues, no scoring, etc. Granite on the other hand, has a tendency to ring, so I'd be careful of that. Best regards, Barry Soundkeeper Recordings http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.com Barry Diament Audio
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