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semente

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About semente

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  1. Thom Yorke, David Byrne Sign Open Letter Addressing ‘Climate Hypocrites’ Claim “Like you — and everyone else — we are stuck in this fossil-fuel economy and without systemic change, our lifestyles will keep on causing climate and ecological harm” Thom Yorke, David Byrne, Brian Eno, U2’s Adam Clayton and Spice Girls’ Mel B are among the artists facing accusations of climate hypocrisy head-on in an open letter penned by environmental activists Extinction Rebellion. As noted by artists in recent interviews, including Yorke’s visit to the Late Show, it’s difficult for an environmentally conscious touring musician to function conscious-free given the ongoing climate crisis; the duplicity is often a target of the media and climate change deniers. “Dear journalists who have called us hypocrites, you’re right. We live high carbon lives and the industries that we are part of have huge carbon footprints. Like you — and everyone else — we are stuck in this fossil-fuel economy and without systemic change, our lifestyles will keep on causing climate and ecological harm,” the open letter notes. continues here -> https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/thom-yorke-david-byrne-eno-extinction-rebellion-open-letter-900296/
  2. Interesting active speaker at only £460/pair: Tannoy GOLD 8 54 Hz – 20 kHz ±3 dB 40 Hz – 20 kHz -10 dB 90° conical @ -6 dB point 110 dB 2 way, active 1.5 kHz 1 x 8" (203 mm) LF driver 1 x 1" (25.4 mm) HF drivers 300 W Class-AB 1 x XLR, balanced 1 x 1⁄4 " TRS, balanced 3.5 mm stereo mini jack 429 x 274 x 336 mm (16.9 x 10.8 x 13.2") 14.0 kg (30.8 lbs) https://www.tannoy.com/Categories/Tannoy/Loudspeaker-Systems/Studio-Monitoring/GOLD-8/p/P0C2C#googtrans(en|en)
  3. It took a lot of effort to convince you of that. 😋
  4. I was in my mid teens at the time at the time of the Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute concert. The song that has lingered in my mind and which still sends shivers down my spine is Peter Gabriel's Biko. Biko September '77 Port Elizabeth weather fine It was business as usual In police room 619 Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko Yihla Moja, Yihla Moja -The man is dead When I try to sleep at night I can only dream in red The outside world is black and white With only one colour dead Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko Yihla Moja, Yihla Moja -The man is dead You can blow out a candle But you can't blow out a fire Once the flames begin to catch The wind will blow it higher Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko Yihla Moja, Yihla Moja -The man is dead And the eyes of the world are watching now watching now Steve Biko: Five facts you didn’t know about the anti-apartheid activist Biko was known for his slogan 'black is beautiful', which he described as meaning 'you are okay as you are, begin to look upon yourself as a human being' Steve Biko, who died fighting apartheid in South Africa, would have turned 70 today. An illustration commemorating Biko’s life and legacy has been published as a Google Doodle in South Africa, the UK, North America, Portugal and other countries. Here are five things you may not know about the student leader and activist. continues here -> https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/steve-biko-google-doodle-who-five-things-anti-apartheid-south-africa-activist-birthday-a7482486.html
  5. In the '80s protest music went global, first with Live Aid and later with the first of two Anti-Apartheid events, the first of which was held in protest for the prolonged arrest of ANC leader Nelson Mandela in June 1988 at Wembley Stadium and broadcast to 67 countries. According to the Wikipedia "In the United States, the Fox television network heavily censored the political aspects of the concert." Nelson Mandela and music: 10 essential anti-apartheid songs By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic Dec. 5, 2013 Nelson Mandela was, quite famously, a fan of European classical music. His two favorite composers were George Frideric Handel and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, but he grew up exposed to the country’s rich tradition of vocal groups forging a unique form of sacred rhythm music. That changed while the former South African president and longtime democratic activist was imprisoned by the pro-apartheid government from 1962 to 1990. He wasn’t allowed access to music. Artists, however, used Mandela’s jailing to fuel global protest songs, and during his years in captivity, Mandela’s messages were delivered on the wings of rhythm and melody. The response to Mandela’s cause, in fact, helped bridge cultural divides that continue to hold. One of the best known songs, Artists United Against Apartheid’s “I Ain’t Gonna Play Sun City,” for the first time brought together on record superstars of rock and R&B with the kings of a rising young genre called hip-hop. On the African continent, anti-apartheid couriers such as Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela, Youssou N’Dour and the Malopoets expressed outrage through song. As the anti-apartheid movement grew in the 1970s and ‘80s, marquee names such as U2, Peter Gabriel, Bruce Springsteen, Steven Van Zandt and Stevie Wonder spoke or sung out on behalf of Nelson Mandela’s cause. What follows are 10 essential works that celebrate the late Nelson Mandela and his efforts. His spirit, perseverance and dignity fueled not only the cause of liberty and equality, but drove music to great heights. continues here -> https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-nelson-mandela-dies-music-ten-essential-antiapartheid-songs-20130627-story.html
  6. I think that people get excited at the prospect of a new OS in spite of the inevitable problems it arises...
  7. What do you need a new medium for? We have files and streaming. Who needs the clutter?
  8. Something a bit more modern. Note how the crowd can recognise itself in the lyrics... Que Parva Que Eu Sou / How silly am I I’m a “generation without pay (broke?)”, And it doesn’t bother me. How silly am I. I’m lucky to be an intern, Because things are bad and will remain so. How silly am I. And I wonder: What a silly world, Where we have to study To be a slave. I’m a “still living with parents (boomerang?) generation”, If I already have everything, why want more? How silly am I. I keep postponing children, husband, And still have the car to pay. How silly am I. And I wonder: What a silly world, Where we have to study To be a slave. I'm a “complaint millennial”, When there’s someone doing worse on TV? How silly am I. I’m a generation "I can’t take it anymore!”, And this situation lasts too long. And silly I am not! And I wonder: What a silly world, Where we have to study To be a slave. What a silly world, Where we have to study To be a slave.
  9. I am a complete ignorant when it comes to rap/hip-hop protest music because I don't like the genre but it would be wonderful if someone could make a few interesting suggestions.
  10. Book suggestion: https://www.amazon.com/Shadow-What-We-Were/dp/1609450027
  11. Todo Cambia / Everything Changes That which is superficial changes Also that which is profound the way of thinking changes Everything in this world changes The weather changes as the years go by The shepherd changes his flock and just as everything changes the fact that I change it's not in the least strange The finest diamond changes its brightness as it travels from hand to hand the bird changes its nest So does a lover change the way he feels The traveler changes his path even if this proves to be harmfull and just as everything changes the fact that I change it's not in the least strange Changes, everything changes The sun changes its course to give way to the night The plant changes and gets dressed in green during spring The beast changes its fur the hair of an old person changes and just as everything changes the fact that I change it's not in the least strange But my love doesn't change no matter how far away I find myself neither the memory nor the pain of my country and my people What changed yesterday will have to change tomorrow Just as I change in this foreign land Changes, everything changes But my love doesn't change no matter how far away I find myself neither the memory nor the pain of my country and my people Changes, everything changes
  12. Violeta Parra's song Gracias A La Vida was immortalised by the great singer Mercedes Sosa: Thanks to life Thanks to life, which has given me so much. It gave me two stars, which when I open them, Perfectly distinguish black from white And in the tall sky its starry backdrop, And within the multitudes of the one I love. Thanks to life, which has given me so much. It gave me hearing that, in all of its reach Records night and day crickets and canaries, Hammers and turbines, bricks and storms, And the tender voice of my beloved. Thanks to life, which has given me so much. It gave me sound and the alphabet. With them the words I think and declare: “Mother,” “Friend,” “Brother” and light shining down on The road of the soul of the one I'm loving. Thanks to life, which has given me so much. It gave me the steps of my tired feet. With them I have traversed cities and puddles Valleys and deserts, mountains and plains. And your house, your street and your garden. Thanks to life, which has given me so much. It gave me this heart that shakes its frame, When I see the fruit of the human brain, When I see good so far from evil, When I look into the depth of your light eyes… Thanks to life, which has given me so much. It gave me laughter and it gave me tears. With them I distinguish happiness from pain The two elements that make up my song, And your song, as well, which is the same song. And everyone’s song, which is my very song.
  13. Smithsonian Folkways Recordings La Nueva Canción The New Song Movement in South America The 1970 victory of the Popular Unity government led by Salvador Allende in Chile marked the rise of the first democratically elected socialist government in Latin America. After years of social and political unrest, the election of the Allende government was seen as a beacon of hope by the Left, both in Chile and throughout the region. As the new president-elect took the stage to greet cheering citizens, a banner above his head read, "You Can't Have a Revolution Without Songs. " It was a powerful statement about the role of music in social and political change that had fueled the emerging popular musical movement in South America known as nueva canción (New Song Movement). https://folkways.si.edu/la-nueva-cancion-new-song-movement-south-america/latin-world-struggle-protest/music/article/smithsonian
  14. The Nueva Canción is a musical and poetic movement that has developed in various parts of Latin America, both in Central and South America. The movement began in the 1960s and 1970s. Depending on the region, this movement was called the Nueva Trova (Cuba), Canción Folclórica (Central America), Canto Nuevo (Southern Cone), Canto Libre, Canciones de Lucha y Esperanza, etc. Although there are several different styles, within the movement there are two key elements: the renewal of folk music and the inclusion of a social message. In the 60s and 70s there were several political polarisations and social struggles throughout the Latin American world. The New Chilean Song in particular began during the time of Eduardo Frei Montalvo's presidency between 1964 and 1970. The music incorporated the sounds of traditional Andean music with popular music. Some of the themes of the poems that served as song lyrics were the support of organized labor, agrarian reforms, and the fight against racism. In 1970 President Frei was succeeded by Salvador Allende Gossens. Allende was only president for three years (November 3, 1970 - September 11, 1973) before being overthrown by a coup d'état backed by the United States. However, during his few years as President Salvador Allende he supported the idea that music should be a way of transmitting social messages. A famous quote from Allende is "No hay revolución sin canciones / There is no revolution without songs." The Nueva Canción Chilena, perhaps the most famous protest music movement in Latin America, produced artists (especially poets and musicians) known worldwide as Victor Jara, Violeta Parra, Angel Parra, Inti Illimani, Quilapaýn and Sergio Ortega, among others. It's mentioned in the song "One Tree Hill" from the Joshua Tree album by U2: And in the world a heart of darkness, a fire zone where poets speak their heart then bleed for it. Jara sang his song, a weapon in the hands of love, though his blood still cries from the ground. Although the movement was banned by Pinochet's Junta Militar (Government of Chile) after the coup d'etat, artists and their successors continue to play and sing the poems today.
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