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I am hoping this thread can be used for general support of Linux issues. I am very much a Linux novice but really like using it for my audio needs (HQP Desktop, Roon server, HQP NAA) and have been able to work through various installations and issues but there are lots of things I don't have a clue and need assistance beyond what you can get searching the Internet.

 

This thread is not for comparing the pro's and con's of the various OS (Linux vs Win10 vs macOS vs etc).

 

That said, I am currently struggling with Linux kernel upgrades. My fitlet2 computer is running Linux Mint using kernel "Linux 5.4.0-74-generic". According to @Miska, he generally recommends using the "low latency" version vs "generic".

 

How do I get the fitlet2 (Intel CPU) to boot using the "low latency" version? The fitlet2 is only used as my HQP NAA.

 

I am aware of the Grub2 tool to select which kernel to load on boot but it is my understanding that Linux typically boots using the latest version. The older kernels are available in case an upgrade doesn't work and you need to revert to an older version. That just happened to me when I tried to upgrade the kernel to 5.12 but there was some other piece of software (lib6??) that was required so I was getting BIOS errors on startup. I was able to revert back to the original version and remove the newer version.

 

Getting back to my question, can I simply select the "low latency" version in Grub2 (assuming "low latency" version exists on my computer) and my system will boot each time with the "low latency" version?

 

Or, should I install a newer kernel version (e.g. 5.8) and only install the "low latency" version from Mainline? With my bad experience from 5.12, just a bit hesitant to on how far up the version chain I can go before I have problems again.

 

331092447_LinuxKernel.thumb.jpg.d855d67579f5dc3e055154c7cdfc1a81.jpg

 

Any assistance is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Nord One UP NC500MB mono blocks > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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Ubuntu should automatically pick up the lowlatency as default. If you are on Ubuntu 20.04, you should be already having 5.8 kernel.

 

If you install meta-package "linux-lowlatency-hwe-20.04" you get latest low latency "hardware enablement" kernel Canonical produces. Currently this is 5.8. If you keep your system up to date you get this updated regularly.

 

My custom kernel is currently 5.10 which is latest official long term maintenance Linux kernel:

https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html

 

Signalyst - Developer of HQPlayer

Pulse & Fidelity - Software Defined Amplifiers

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Thanks @Miska. This would be for Linux Mint on my fitlet2.

 

If I issue the following command:

 

sudo apt-get install linux-lowlatency-hwe-20.04

 

does that bring in and install everything I need?

 

The documentation mentions requirements:

 

linux-headers-lowlatency-hwe-20.04
linux-image-lowlatency-hwe-20.04

 

Do these need to be installed separately?

 

 

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Nord One UP NC500MB mono blocks > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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3 minutes ago, ericuco said:

sudo apt-get install linux-lowlatency-hwe-20.04

 

does that bring in and install everything I need?

 

Yes...

 

Quote

The documentation mentions requirements:

 

linux-headers-lowlatency-hwe-20.04
linux-image-lowlatency-hwe-20.04

 

Do these need to be installed separately?

 

No, the above meta-package will pull in those two meta packages, which in turn pull in the actual latest kernel image and header packages.

 

 

Note that this kind of assumes that you are on Mint 20.1 (ulyssa) which is based on Ubuntu 20.04 (focal).

 

Signalyst - Developer of HQPlayer

Pulse & Fidelity - Software Defined Amplifiers

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Thanks @Miska.

 

Well that was simply enough. Both my HQP Desktop (Ubuntu Studio 20.04) server and HQP NAA (Linux Mint 20 Ulyssa) have been upgraded to linux-lowlatency-hwe-20.04.

 

I wish I had asked earlier rather than spending a few hours last night messing with this.

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Nord One UP NC500MB mono blocks > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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I learned, after trying everything possible on my Linux journey, including building Arch from scratch, that keeping it simple results in significantly fewer headaches and everything works better and smoother as well. Now I run a very basic Ubuntu installation with just enough to run HQP and Roon Core, and it works flawlessly. Might there be a millimeter better sound out there someplace? sure. Do I care? nope.

No electron left behind...

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22 hours ago, AudioDoctor said:

I learned, after trying everything possible on my Linux journey, including building Arch from scratch, that keeping it simple results in significantly fewer headaches and everything works better and smoother as well. Now I run a very basic Ubuntu installation with just enough to run HQP and Roon Core, and it works flawlessly. Might there be a millimeter better sound out there someplace? sure. Do I care? nope.


Totally agree with you. I now have three Linux computers (Ubuntu Studio, Ubuntu minimal installation, Linux Mint) that just have one purpose each - HQP Desktop, Roon server, HQP NAA. In general I don’t touch any of them other than for updates and upgrades. 
 

The most difficult thing I have had to do (besides this recent effort) was to edit the /etc/ fstab file to nsf mount my Synology NAS.

 

I didn’t think that updating a kernel would have been a big deal but it was proving to be a challenge until Miska bailed me out. System level stuff is always a bit of a fright because you can really screw things up. That said, with a few Linux installations under my belt now, the worse case is having to do a fresh installation which usually is not too bad.

 

In any case, I thought I would start this thread for any Linux questions that people have could be resolved by experts on AS.

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Nord One UP NC500MB mono blocks > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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1 hour ago, ericuco said:

In any case, I thought I would start this thread for any Linux questions that people have could be resolved by experts on AS.

 

It's a good idea. that was my advice for people having problems with Linux. Keep it simple. An endpoint for example, doesn't need to be anything more than a Raspberry Pi, for example.

No electron left behind...

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