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Minimize traffic for a network card


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Hi guys,

 

I am currently wondering how to use a firewall rule on a Windows 2008 server to minimize the traffic on one network card of two.

 

Background:
I have a Windows 2008 Server with a Logitech Media Server. This has two network cards. One card is connected to my home network, which is also connected to the Internet via DSL. The second network card is connected to the completely separate music LAN. The LMS server receives the streams from the Internet via the home network, then converts them to PCM and also makes room corrections for my KEF LS50 Wireless via SOX and then sends the stream via the second network card to the respective end device in the music network (KEF LS50 Wireless via Ethernet or to the Squeezebox Touch).

I would like to block all outgoing traffic on the "music" network card, except for that of the LMS. However, this is not easily possible in Windows Server 2008.

 

Does anyone have any idea how to do this?

Any help is most welcome.

 

Regards,

 

Tom 

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I was thinking of responding but my advice would be unheeded as I generally regard these types of posts as someone looking for a specific answer that already lines up with a belief system.

 

What I would tell you is that I wouldn't worry about it because it's not going to make an audible difference when your bias is controlled via blinding.

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To the OP, I would argue that accomplishing what you want to do is fairly easy using the built in Windows Firewall but agree with Plissken that the benefit of doing so is basically zero.

 

But with that said if you really want to do it anyway then just create a Windows firewall rule with the source IP of the "Music" network card and a destination IP of the KEF speaker allowing all protocols between them as a first step. Then create a second rule that Denies everything else from source IP to Any.

 

Once you have that working you could then work on slimming down the allowed traffic between the Music network card and the KEF speaker. You could use the "netstat"command (with appropriate switches) to get an idea of what communication is occurring between those two endpoints. Once you know that info you could tweak your Windows firewall rule to allow only the communication you saw previously and block everything else between Music Card IP and KEF IP.

 

I've only given a high level idea of what steps are involved here on purpose as typing a step by step of all details is not something I have the time or motivation to do outside of work 😀

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Several years ago I looked into the CPU processing load and networking and found the processing load of my Windows 10 is reduced when there is no network is connected to PC, because antivirus, firewall, IP stack and other network related tasks stop. And when network cable is connected, many tasks starts to run even when there is no user initiated network traffic.

 

So it is better to check if the SQ changes or not when all the network is disconnected and played sound from local files

Sunday programmer since 1985

Developer of PlayPcmWin

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7 hours ago, yamamoto2002 said:

So it is better to check if the SQ changes or not when all the network is disconnected and played sound from local files

 

Given that the OP's players are actually the Squeezebox & the KEF LS50 Wireless speaker streamers (the Windows 2008 server running the Logitech Media Server application only provides, albeit with LMS's transcoder enabled using SoX, the audio files over the network for the streamers, ie, the server does not actually play the files), do you still think the OP needs to do that local file check and if so how?

We will win because our NHS is the beating heart of this country. It is the best of this country. It is unconquerable. It is powered by love.

-- Boris Johnson

 

We are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divide us.

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16 hours ago, cjf said:

To the OP, I would argue that accomplishing what you want to do is fairly easy using the built in Windows Firewall but agree with Plissken that the benefit of doing so is basically zero.

 

But with that said if you really want to do it anyway then just create a Windows firewall rule with the source IP of the "Music" network card and a destination IP of the KEF speaker allowing all protocols between them as a first step. Then create a second rule that Denies everything else from source IP to Any.

 

Once you have that working you could then work on slimming down the allowed traffic between the Music network card and the KEF speaker. You could use the "netstat"command (with appropriate switches) to get an idea of what communication is occurring between those two endpoints. Once you know that info you could tweak your Windows firewall rule to allow only the communication you saw previously and block everything else between Music Card IP and KEF IP.

 

I've only given a high level idea of what steps are involved here on purpose as typing a step by step of all details is not something I have the time or motivation to do outside of work 😀

Many thanks - will try this. I just thought that one can bind rules at nics. But this seems to be impossible in Windows.

But to be honest, you could be right, that all the effort is useless - but let's try.

 

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