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Keith Jarrett Confronts a Future Without the Piano


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“I don’t know what my future is supposed to be,” he added. “I don’t feel right now like I’m a pianist. That’s all I can say about that.”

 

After a pause, he reconsidered. “But when I hear two-handed piano music, it’s very frustrating, in a physical way. If I even hear Schubert, or something played softly, that’s enough for me. Because I know that I couldn’t do that. And I’m not expected to recover that. The most I’m expected to recover in my left hand is possibly the ability to hold a cup in it. So it’s not a ‘shoot the piano player’ thing. It’s: I already got shot. Ah-ha-ha-ha.”

 

I'm really glad to see that he survived the strokes but Keith Jarrett not being able to play the piano is just such sad news.

 

 

 

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Thanks for sharing the NYT article. It is beautifully written but feels very strange and sad.
Sounds like the moment to remember Keith Jarrett's work and send him a "Get well soon, Keith" note, sadly.

 

I remember grandpa still living 10 years after his second stroke up to the age of 92, though he was a very different personality deprived of many of his former abilities. For anyone that lives through such an experience (personally or with their close ones) it is very bad news.

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Ooh no......so sad to hear that. I just posted about K.J.'s first solo piano album and how i I find it one of the best in it's genre.

Must be very very hard for him. Keith is the piano. But like JoeWhip says Oscar came back, so all is not lost.

 

 

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1 hour ago, JoeWhip said:

A similar thing happened to Oscar Peterson and he had to retrain himself to play the piano again. He did and beautifully. Hopefully KJ can as well.

Peterson didn’t play a club for 4 1/2 years, and he never regained full facility in his left hand (the stroke caused left hemiplegia).  Sadly, a lot of musicians and other artists have suffered similarly.  
 

Pat Martino developed total amnesia along with a host of other problems when he bled into his brain.  Miraculously, he relearned his knowledge and skills even after major brain surgery and seriously debilitating treatments.  Jimmy Bruno was in a coma for weeks after falling.  I don’t know why he fell, but many serious falls in our age group are caused by cardiac or neurologic events.  He was then in rehab for many weeks, but he also got his chops back.

 

Growing older is a mixed blessing........

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Americana 

Keith at his most intimate.

or maybe even better or more fitting;

spacer.png

 

Quote

The Melody at Night, with You is a solo album by American pianist Keith Jarrett recorded at his home studio in 1998 and released by ECM Records in 1999.[1] It was recorded during his bout with chronic fatigue syndrome and was dedicated to Jarrett's second and then-wife, Rose Anne: "For Rose Anne, who heard the music, then gave it back to me".[2]

In an interview in Time magazine in November 1999, he explained

"I started taping it in December 1997, as a Christmas present for my wife. I'd just had my Hamburg Steinway overhauled and wanted to try it out, and I have my studio right next to the house, so if I woke up and had a half-decent day, I would turn on the tape recorder and play for a few minutes. I was too fatigued to do more. Then something started to click with the mics placement, the new action of the instrument,... I could play so soft,... and the internal dynamics of the melodies... of the songs... It was one of those little miracles that you have to be ready for, though part of it was that I just didn't have the energy to be clever."[3]

 

 

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3 hours ago, bluesman said:

Peterson didn’t play a club for 4 1/2 years, and he never regained full facility in his left hand (the stroke caused left hemiplegia).  Sadly, a lot of musicians and other artists have suffered similarly.  
 

Pat Martino developed total amnesia along with a host of other problems when he bled into his brain.  Miraculously, he relearned his knowledge and skills even after major brain surgery and seriously debilitating treatments.  Jimmy Bruno was in a coma for weeks after falling.  I don’t know why he fell, but many serious falls in our age group are caused by cardiac or neurologic events.  He was then in rehab for many weeks, but he also got his chops back.

 

Growing older is a mixed blessing........

 

Jerry Garcia re-learned how to play guitar after coma and was performing for almost ten years after that.  

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3 hours ago, JoeWhip said:

Yes it is, indeed, but it beats the alternative.

I just laid up a few bottles of a wine that starts drinking well in 20 years.  The snide comments from friends and family have been amusing, e.g.  "Your aide can remove the cork", "The nurse can use it to clean your bed sores", and "It'll keep the feeding tube from clogging".

 

Fortunately, I'm impervious to insult.  I bought it to enjoy at my 94th birthday party!

 

35 minutes ago, AnotherSpin said:

Jerry Garcia re-learned how to play guitar after coma and was performing for almost ten years after that.  

As I recall, he was a diabetic and spent a few days in what I suspect was a hypoglycemic coma.  He did lose some mental acuity but apparently recovered most or all of it in rehab.  He truly dodged a bullet.

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13 hours ago, AnotherSpin said:

A very long time ago, in the mid-70s, I bought an LP record of Jarrett's My Song. It's been years, but every time I hear the title song, I know that even though a whole life has passed, as someone might say, I haven't changed a bit, I'm the same as I was that day. There is no past, nothing ever happened.

 

 

Screen Shot 2020-10-23 at 07.07.41.png

 

This was also my first ever Jazz album. I bought it in the late 80s/early90s, but still on Vinyl. Still have it somewhere in storage.

 

Here's my story with that particular album: https://musicophilesblog.com/2015/07/13/keith-jarretts-my-song-i-really-shouldnt-be-liking-this-album/

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56 minutes ago, Musicophile said:

 

This was also my first ever Jazz album. I bought it in the late 80s/early90s, but still on Vinyl. Still have it somewhere in storage.

 

Here's my story with that particular album: https://musicophilesblog.com/2015/07/13/keith-jarretts-my-song-i-really-shouldnt-be-liking-this-album/

 

First ever Jarrett's album which I bought was Arbour Zena. My Song after that. Staircase, Koln Concert, Byablue followed... All those on LPs. I re-read your My Song story, thank you once more.

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