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Is there a way to know where in the track the error occurred while ripping


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Without listening to the whole track from beginning to finish? 

I ask because sometimes even when it says there are errors, when I play it I can't hear any errors. 

 

So I basically want to know whenever a rip says 'inaccurate,' whether I can hear any noticeable corruptions in the track. 

If I can't hear any pop or obvious disruption I'm fine with it. 

 

I'm using dbpoweramp.

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17 minutes ago, pionphil said:

Without listening to the whole track from beginning to finish? 

I ask because sometimes even when it says there are errors, when I play it I can't hear any errors. 

 

So I basically want to know whenever a rip says 'inaccurate,' whether I can hear any noticeable corruptions in the track. 

If I can't hear any pop or obvious disruption I'm fine with it. 

 

I'm using dbpoweramp.

If you can't hear any pop or obvious disruption don't fuss about it.

 However, if it bothers you, you could always try cleaning the disc thoroughly with warm soapy water , rinse in clean water and then try it again.

 A Spectacles cleaning cloth also gives me good results with discs that may appear to have a fine dull film on them due to gases emitted from an aging plastic CD case.

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 28-06-2020

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I wouldn't fuss about it if I can't hear it but my question was since I don't want to listen from beginning to finish to check whether or not I can hear or not, if there was a way of knowing where in the track the error occurred (I think I heard EAC lets you know where in the track the error occurred?) so that I could listen to that part only instead of listening from beginning to end.

 

However I just tried EAC but can't find the Rip button to begin with and the button that says "get information from metada provider" threatens to delete all data in CD if I click on it. 

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48 minutes ago, pionphil said:

(I think I heard EAC lets you know where in the track the error occurred?

 No.

I also use EAC. I don't know of any way to locate where the error occurred, which can even be from a tiny spec of dust, to as drastic as pinholes in the reflective coating due to some printing inks used many years earlier

 

 Action-Copy Selected Tracks-Uncompressed- Browse for Folder-

When the rip is completed it will tell you which (if any) tracks have errors.

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 28-06-2020

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On 10/15/2020 at 11:01 PM, pionphil said:

Without listening to the whole track from beginning to finish? 

I ask because sometimes even when it says there are errors, when I play it I can't hear any errors. 

 

So I basically want to know whenever a rip says 'inaccurate,' whether I can hear any noticeable corruptions in the track. 

If I can't hear any pop or obvious disruption I'm fine with it. 

 

I'm using dbpoweramp.

dbpoweramp has an error log, believe it tells you there. If only a few tracks are inaccurate the disc has a problem. Clean first

with soap and water, dry with lens cloth and re-rip. if inaccuracy persists use a fine cerium oxide polishing paste to buff the CD

with terry cloth; CD's can be discolored by contaminants or raw micro scratches parallel to the track can interfere with reading.

A few CD's just won't be correctable, but 9 out of 10 should improve.

 

dbpoweramp also has an error correct rip option where it interatively rereads errors to correct them, works if only small errors but

when there are a lot you could wait a day or two for it to finish and still not have a good result.

 

Best to fix track inaccuracies... assume that any problem you don't hear today will be heard later as you improve your digital playback.

Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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6 hours ago, davide256 said:

dbpoweramp has an error log, believe it tells you there. If only a few tracks are inaccurate the disc has a problem. Clean first

with soap and water, dry with lens cloth and re-rip. if inaccuracy persists use a fine cerium oxide polishing paste to buff the CD

with terry cloth; CD's can be discolored by contaminants or raw micro scratches parallel to the track can interfere with reading.

A few CD's just won't be correctable, but 9 out of 10 should improve.

 

dbpoweramp also has an error correct rip option where it interatively rereads errors to correct them, works if only small errors but

when there are a lot you could wait a day or two for it to finish and still not have a good result.

 

Best to fix track inaccuracies... assume that any problem you don't hear today will be heard later as you improve your digital playback.

E.A.C does the same, and I agree with the rest of what you are saying, having had to do all of those things from time to time. You used to be able to take a not too severely scratched CD/DVD to a DVD hire store for "resurfacing"  on their machine for a small fee too.

I have found quite a few older CDs that look dull due to the gases from aging plastic covers that only need a rub over with a clean Lens cloth to make them look fresh again. I frequently place a Lens cloth in an electric jug to freshen it up, then let it dry again .

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 28-06-2020

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I've found EAC has handled all losses of quite major chunks of the reflective surface, so far - up to the size of a decent nail head.

 

I don't get precious with the actual CDs when cleaning, and it hasn't caused problems ... if a bit of dirt or some gunk over an area, then under the tap with slow water flow, and just rub radially over the area with my finger; perhaps add a touch of detergent to soap it up, and rinse thoroughly. Shake off excess water, and dry thoroughly with very light, radial swipes of a normal tissue.

 

Scratches are removed with with high gloss, finishing car polish; keep working, radially, on an area until visually OK - I have recovered ex-library CDs which look like they have been used for drink coasters for most of their life this way, and they play perfectly.

Frank

 

http://artofaudioconjuring.blogspot.com/

 

 

Over and out.

.

 

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Does radially mean in a circular motion? For finishing car polish would the second one in this Amazon search result be ok? (called Meguiar's) https://www.amazon.com/s?k=high+gloss+finishing+polish&ref=nb_sb_noss

On 10/18/2020 at 7:25 PM, fas42 said:

then under the tap with slow water flow, and just rub radially over the area with my finger; perhaps add a touch of detergent to soap it up, and rinse thoroughly. Shake off excess water, and dry thoroughly with very light, radial swipes of a normal tissue

 

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4 hours ago, pionphil said:

Does radially mean in a circular motion? For finishing car polish would the second one in this Amazon search result be ok? (called Meguiar's) https://www.amazon.com/s?k=high+gloss+finishing+polish&ref=nb_sb_noss

 

 

Definitely not circular!! ... Going from the centre to the edge of disc, back and forth, along a radius, always. Always do it as lightly as possible, enough to get the job done and no more. Though I have at times got extremely aggressive, literally to the point where I caused the plastic to show distortion, trying to get rid of a really deep scratch - this was too much, and should only be tried if really desperate, 🙃.

 

Yes, anything using terms like Mirror Glaze, Ultra Finishing - mine is an Australian item called Diamond Glaze; what's needed are the ones with the tiniest cutting abrasives, which never leave a visible mark. I just use a small squirt of the liquid on a several times folded paper tissue, with the disc lying on a paper towel on a hard surface; just start very lightly, and constantly check how it's looking; you should be able to get it to mirror up to "look like new", except for the worst scratches. When I'm happy with how it looks, I squirt a bit of detergent on it, and with my finger soap it up thoroughly with water and rub to get rid of excess polish; and rinse, and then dry with very light strokes of tissue paper. And play immediately, 🙂.

 

I have rescued monstrosities of scratching this way - some times I have done this ritual several times on the one disc, until the scratches are enough removed so that it plays cleanly. No long term issues with doing this that I have found - of course, be ultra careful with the silvered side; never, ever try to do anything to clean that!

Frank

 

http://artofaudioconjuring.blogspot.com/

 

 

Over and out.

.

 

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