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Just now, gmgraves said:

This Fiat is drop dead gorgeous, as you can see.

It really is!

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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8 hours ago, sphinxsix said:

Chris, c'mon face the facts, you've run out of the arguments, join the objectivist camp!

You are really welcome!  ;)

 

BTW I've just began thinking quite seriously about the fact that as for art I'm mostly an objectivist and OTOH with audio gear I'm in the subjectivist camp.., cars - no way - i am a subjectivist (handling!), women - also, does the other possibility exist at all (?!)

 

What about you guys (inclusions of other fields are welome!)?

 

 

 

Ahh but that's the point. Objectivist and subjectivist views are both flawed. Reality lies between the subjective and the objective.👌

Sound Minds Mind Sound

 

 

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@The Computer Audiophile Maybe we don't need an analogue subforum here but it seems that a car subforum is an absolute necessity.. :)

 

Actually when I mentioned a 'cheap Fiat' I was thinking more like.. :)

 

Koop een tweedehands Fiat Seicento in Oranje op AutoScout24

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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1 hour ago, gmgraves said:

This Fiat, with it’s PinninFarina styling is drop dead gorgeous, as you can see.

 

The Coupe model I had posted here was both designed and built by Pininfarina.

The engine in 16V Turbo that I owned was the one from Lancia Delta Integrale. A really good engine, AFAIK the later 20V version wasn't as reliable.

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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1 hour ago, gmgraves said:

In the ‘50’s, and well into the ‘70’s, the Italian carozzeria (coach builders) such as PinninFarina, Bertone, Touring, Zagato, Ghia, Vignale (the picture you posted, above, is a Vignale body), etc. made some of the most interesting (not to mention beautiful) car bodies in the world. What happened is that when the world went to unibody construction, there was no longer a chassis that could take custom bodies. This more or less limited the carozzeria’s ability to build custom bodies because they had to fashion a custom unibody structure as well as the custom styling. In the 1960’s, Fiat built the ultra lovely and ultra desirable Fiat Dino Spider (convertible). This car had standard coach work, and a lovely 2.4 liter V6 which was developed from an engine designed by Dino Ferrari, the Old Man’s son who died young of multiple sclerosis. This Fiat, with it’s PinninFarina styling is drop dead gorgeous, as you can see.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.5c8f71f11c9bbca751705425477a0fa6.jpeg

 

The 50's and 60's were the good years, in terms of cars being highly individualistic ... as compared to today! 😉

 

I have a personal weakness for an earlier era - so, this Fiat is the one that ticks the boxes for me,

 

Italy motor museums 10

Frank

 

http://artofaudioconjuring.blogspot.com/

 

 

Over and out.

.

 

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off-topic—

On 9/1/2020 at 8:52 AM, sphinxsix said:

@GregWormald have you ever worked with audiophile patients e.g. via Zoom.? How much would that eventually cost.? Does desktop speakers quality matter in such situation.? ;)

😆

but IMO sort of deserves a serious answer. No acknowledged audiophiles via Zoom, no.

My remote sessions were the same as face-to-face, $100/hour before I retired.

Speaker quality had some relevance, as did video quality, otherwise the non-verbal subtleties got lost.

 

I did work with a fair number of artists though. It's amazing how many had 'traumatic' histories and it was always challenging to find ways of "improving their world" without destroying their creativity.

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6 hours ago, sphinxsix said:

@The Computer Audiophile Maybe we don't need an analogue subforum here but it seems that a car subforum is an absolute necessity.. :)

 

Actually when I mentioned a 'cheap Fiat' I was thinking more like.. :)

 

Koop een tweedehands Fiat Seicento in Oranje op AutoScout24

 

Actually the Quintessential “Cheap Fiat” is the Fiat 500 from 1957 - 197x. When it came out, the average Italian could buy this diminutive car for the Lire equivalent of  US$250.00.

George

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53 minutes ago, gmgraves said:

Actually the Quintessential “Cheap Fiat” is the Fiat 500 from 1957 - 197x. When it came out, the average Italian could buy this diminutive car for the Lire equivalent of  US$250.00.

 

Yes the little "Bambino" was quite popular and a great little car. It had no seat belts or much by way of safety features. When my best friend turned 17 and got his driver's licence, being Italian, he naturally acquired a Fiat 500. We had two road accidents which were fortunately of fairly low impact but in one of them my passenger door flung open and I found myself sitting on the ground in the middle-of-the-road.😮

Sound Minds Mind Sound

 

 

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On 9/1/2020 at 6:48 PM, Ropet said:

In my view this is a more engineering way to analyse voices, like an amplifier with a frequency 1 - 100,000 Hz. It does not say anything about emotions, how a voice grab you etc.

 

Lucinda Williams, Bod Dylan and Tom Waits do not have the purest voices around. Still it put many in trance, not all but quite a few. Are they then great voices? Against what meassure? For whom? Why? What's "wrong" with them who like it or those who don't? How much is the tune and arrangement and what part is the voice?

 

 

 

Another aspect is 'Total Awe' in hearing a persons vocal gift.   Each time I listen to DT I am put in 'Awe' at his stainless steel vocal cords.    I have seen him live 10 times and he is easily able to replicate everything live, that he puts down on record.     I have no idea how he goes from guttural scream to melodic whisper in the blink of an eye.   I am constantly mesmerised by his vocal abilities.    

 

The emotions I feel watching DT live are not the mechanics I see n action, it is observing a rare talent on display.    It is like watching a one off.   I ask myself, who else can do that, like that.     Answer: Probably no-one.

 

Best singer is obviously subjective.    Having oneself put in 'Awe' is also subjective, but a wonderful feeling to attain.

 

Beth Hart is another live performer that has had me in 'Awe'.    She gave me goose bumps when I saw her for the 1st time in an small club like venue.      Seeing Chris Cornell put on a live solo show was also Awe inspiring.     Corey Glover out the front of Living Colour is always Awe Inspiring to me.       Imelda May made me shed a tear at her show her voice was so, so pure.

 

I love Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby but I am not in Awe of their abilities.   They are both 100% pure but their vocals don't emotionally move me like Devin, Corey and Chris do. 

 

Regards Cazzesman

 

 

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, GregWormald said:

I did work with a fair number of artists though. It's amazing how many had 'traumatic' histories and it was always challenging to find ways of "improving their world" without destroying their creativity.

 

Yes, must they "suffer" for their work to be the most creative?  A very interesting concept to consider.

 

Certainly many jazz musicians ended up on heroin following Charlie Parker's use.

 

Bill

Labels assigned by CA members: "Cogley's ML sock-puppet," "weaponizer of psychology," "ethically-challenged," "professionally dubious," "machismo," "lover of old westerns," "shill," "expert on ducks and imposters," "Janitor in Chief," "expert in Karate," "ML fanboi or employee," "Alabama Trump supporter with an NRA decal on the windshield of his car," sycophant

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24 minutes ago, Bill Brown said:

Yes, must they "suffer" for their work to be the most creative?  A very interesting concept to consider. Certainly many jazz musicians ended up on heroin following Charlie Parker's use.

I doubt the Beatles would have been as creative without LSD, and pot use is pretty endemic among musicians. Neither of those induce suffering though, at worst a bad acid trip can be unsettling for several hours. 

“The best sounding audio product is the one that exhibits the least audible flaws.”

 Dr. Floyd Toole

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7 hours ago, Audiophile Neuroscience said:

 

Yes the little "Bambino" was quite popular and a great little car. It had no seat belts or much by way of safety features. When my best friend turned 17 and got his driver's licence, being Italian, he naturally acquired a Fiat 500. We had two road accidents which were fortunately of fairly low impact but in one of them my passenger door flung open and I found myself sitting on the ground in the middle-of-the-road.😮

Whoops!

George

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Here is a Picasso I have.  Notice how he does the date backwards?

 

(Picasso pic deleted.  Maybe not safe for here?)

 

 

RIG:  MB Pro - Benchmark DAC3 L | Benchmark AHB2 | Paradigm Sig S6 Cables:   Van Damme XLR Canare 4S11 Biwire Lifatec optical Wireworld and IsoTek power

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15 hours ago, GregWormald said:

 

I did work with a fair number of artists though. It's amazing how many had 'traumatic' histories and it was always challenging to find ways of "improving their world" without destroying their creativity.

 

This is a very interesting topic.

In your experience - is it more often trauma than e.g. neurosis that in a way fuels their creativity?

I can't help thinking about James Hetfield doing psychotherapy (definitely connected also with his addiction tendencies) during the "St Anger" sessions and the later weaker (IMO) results of the band's work with some ambivalence - on one hand IMO it's quite easy to see how Hetfield had become a happier, more mature guy, on the other hand - both 'St Anger's and later albums quality shows that the band's creative potential hasn't been on par with the one they showed earlier in their career. This of course may be a coincidence - maybe the 'Tallica guys are simply 'Too old for rock'n'roll' but I've also heard about examples of artists who didn't want to do therapy out of their fear that it could destroy their creativity.

I really wonder what are the methods which can on one hand help to simply make an artist's life better and on the other hand aren't a danger to his creative powers..

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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