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So Cool - C-LOCK Power Connection Guard

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36 minutes ago, davide256 said:

until you trip on the cord and rip the socket/plug out of the wall... bad idea. This would never pass UL testing. Plug locks should have a limited strength, separate before

damaging the outlet

 

There is risk to everything in life. Power outlets are great, until one sticks a knife into one. The key is do minimize risk in a realistic way. Tripping over a cord is possible, but the risk can be minimized. I never walk behind my equipment and don't think most people can even fit back there. 


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9 minutes ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

I never walk behind my equipment and don't think most people can even fit back there. 

 

In which case you shouldn't need a C-LOCK Power Connection Guard unless you have a cat or  puppy ¬¬


How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

 

PROFILE UPDATED 26-12-2019

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1 minute ago, sandyk said:

 

In which case you shouldn't need a C-LOCK Power Connection Guard unless you have a cat or  puppy ¬¬

I guess my experience is vastly different from yours. 
 

Do you see this product as something to only be used to stop people from pulling cables out of the wall if they trip on the cable?


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6 minutes ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

I guess my experience is vastly different from yours. 
 

Do you see this product as something to only be used to stop people from pulling cables out of the wall if they trip on the cable?

 I have never felt the need for such an item, although on a couple of occasions I have had mains plugs come partly out, but  due to me previously doing something in that general area.


How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

 

PROFILE UPDATED 26-12-2019

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Its just unsafe bling to me. I'd much prefer to see plug ends developed where the blades have tension screws to expand them for

greater positive pressure or a plug that has spring tension contacts to deal with the inevitable contact deformation/ loosening over time.

These would allow safe pullout but insure good contact pressure. Strong contact pressure is important to electrical conductivity and

reducing oxidization.


Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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As a part of some other work, I had AQ NRG Edison Duplex Wall Outlets installed and they have remarkable grip.  It takes great effort to insert or remove plugs and, if I were to trip over a cord, the only results would be damage to me and extraction of the other end of the cord from the component. 

 

I cannot see why more complication is necessary.

 


Kal Rubinson

Music in the Round

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

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4 hours ago, davide256 said:

Its just unsafe bling to me. I'd much prefer to see plug ends developed where the blades have tension screws to expand them for

greater positive pressure or a plug that has spring tension contacts to deal with the inevitable contact deformation/ loosening over time.

These would allow safe pullout but insure good contact pressure. Strong contact pressure is important to electrical conductivity and

reducing oxidization.

Quarter turn lock receptacles have been around forever on the commercial side of things and for that very reason - not wanting to have power interrupted from a plug dropping out from the receptacle at the worst time.

 

This looks like a really cool and clever way of accomplishing the same thing.  For any plug/receptacle in a vertical alignment, gravity always works against you.  Consider this as the "anti-gravity" plug for your stereo.

 

Now, back to the age old question.  Should the ground pin on the duplex receptacle be oriented up or down?  

 

When I started in the trade, the thought was the ground pin went down, because it was the biggest, strongest, and if the plug was pulled down from the receptacle it would be the last to break.

 

In later years, some people decided that the ground pin should be oriented up when installing the receptacle, based on the fact that being bigger and stronger it would better resist pullout, and if it did not expose a live terminal.  

 

I wonder if there could be differences in the sonic qualities with either orientation?  :)

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5 minutes ago, SJK said:

Quarter turn lock receptacles have been around forever on the commercial side of things and for that very reason - not wanting to have power interrupted from a plug dropping out from the receptacle at the worst time.

 

This looks like a really cool and clever way of accomplishing the same thing.  For any plug/receptacle in a vertical alignment, gravity always works against you.  Consider this as the "anti-gravity" plug for your stereo.

 

Now, back to the age old question.  Should the ground pin on the duplex receptacle be oriented up or down?  

 

When I started in the trade, the thought was the ground pin went down, because it was the biggest, strongest, and if the plug was pulled down from the receptacle it would be the last to break.

 

In later years, some people decided that the ground pin should be oriented up when installing the receptacle, based on the fact that being bigger and stronger it would better resist pullout, and if it did not expose a live terminal.  

 

I wonder if there could be differences in the sonic qualities with either orientation?  :)

I believe it's mandated in some states that receptacles must be installed sideways. Seems like change just for change.


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1 hour ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

I believe it's mandated in some states that receptacles must be installed sideways. Seems like change just for change.

While some industries or companies may have rules about receptacle orientation, it's not part of the NEC code book.

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On 5/19/2020 at 6:02 PM, Speedskater said:

While some industries or companies may have rules about receptacle orientation, it's not part of the NEC code book.

Nor the CSA, but that never stopped anyone from having a strong opinion about something that doesn’t matter. 
 

Years ago, when dealing with people who wanted to do something that was an effective shortcut but perhaps dangerous, I would say “That’s against the code.”  
 

Yeah, whatever. Code Schmode.
 

I eventually learned to say “It’s against the law.”  
 

They always listened after that. 

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Glock's gonna sue them anyway. The name and the logo are direct rip-offs, and Glock's famous for going after stuff like this.

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7 minutes ago, Ralf Hutter said:

Glock's gonna sue them anyway. The name and the logo are direct rip-offs, and Glock's famous for going after stuff like this.

You think so?

 

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Screen Shot 2020-05-20 at 8.33.42 PM.png


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Just a follow up, my whole belief that sideways outlets were code somewhere can't be substantiated. I searched forever, but at least I found that in Chicago it's a thing for people to do this. That's likely where I first heard about it. 

 

OK, back to regularly scheduled programming. 


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10 minutes ago, SJK said:

I think the wiring and contact area for a residential duplex receptacle is more than suitable for the stated rating of AC 120 V and 15 A.  That's generally derated to 80% by code for a maximum of 12 A - they want to avoid nuisance trips.

 

One of the things, however, that often gets overlooked is when the receptacle design changed from side screws to include those push pin holes at the back.  It makes the receptacle or switch easier to install, but creates a failure point.  A light spring tension with a knife edge is the only contact!  Depending on the loading, that connection will fail in three to five years or more.  I can't even count how many of those I've changed over the years.

 

When I do wiring in my house as part of renovations, I use the screw terminals only - on everything.  It's a quick and simple check for power continuity for anyone, if those back push pins are being used change it to the screw connection.  This is presuming, of course, people can do that safely and without placing themselves at risk.  

 

Have a look at the two images with this post.  The first shows the contact area using the push pin - that doesn't look like a connection rated for 12 A.  The second image shows the difference in quality between a $3 residential receptacle and a $30 heavy duty commercial version, rough numbers of course.

 

Sometimes you're better off just buying a Hubbell HBL series to connect your stereo, and that's likely what the "cryogenic audiophile" version is. 

 

Picture1.thumb.jpg.a69d3404083b9378e3ae9d40cd0c7efd.jpgPicture2.thumb.jpg.94df3a38ec3c9e4e7c801ee606414365.jpg

 

Excellent info!


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8 hours ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

Just a follow up, my whole belief that sideways outlets were code somewhere can't be substantiated. I searched forever, but at least I found that in Chicago it's a thing for people to do this. That's likely where I first heard about it. 

 

OK, back to regularly scheduled programming. 

Here in West Michigan I see them regularly installed sideways within the face of baseboard or backspash on higher end residential construction.


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When you attach one of these clamps, make sure the the outlet box for the receptacle is firmly attached to the wall framing. Because retrofit outlets are often only attached to the wall board with small clips. So in an accident, the entire box could be pulled out of the wall.

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