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Did you use spades with your Furutech outlets?

Question

For those of you who

 

1. have installed Furutech GTX NCF outlets

 

2. are using 10 gauge wire

 

Did you purchase and use the Furutech spades to connect power to the outlet. Furutechs website and several other sites ‘recommend’ using the spades with 10 gauge wire. However, no one I have talked to has used the spades. The outlets do have a place for the spades to connect.

 

thanks,

Michael


FRONT END: Analog: Radikal Linn LP12 > Linn Urika 2 phono stage. Sound: Linn Klimax Katalyst DSM > Linn Duo amp >Maggie 3.7i  Wires + Power: Transparent: Reference Speaker, XL Power Conditioner + XL Power Cords. Furutech NFC Rhodium outlet on 10 gauge dedicated circuit with isolated ground Isolation: HRS SXR stand, M3X2 Bases. 
 

Connected to back end by: Transparent Ethernet 

 

BACK END: Digital: ,OpticalModule > EtherREGEN < Roon Nucleus +, QNAP HS251 Isolation: Salamander Archetype rack, HRS M3X2 base the under Nucleus, ER, NAS, Stillpoints under all others Power: Paul Hynes SR4 > ER, SR7 > Nucleus & NAS,  HDPlex200 > OpticalModule. Furutech NFC Rhodium outlet on 10 gauge dedicated circuit with isolated ground 

 

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You mean 10AWG on a US style receptacle Furutech notwithstanding?

There's no other way really, heck I use rings actually even on 12AWG, you just get the transfer of current using bare connections.

 

Ring lugs are necessary for the ground, if the screw loosens, there's still some contact area, if a spade is used, the earth wire will most likely fall off.


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2 minutes ago, One and a half said:

You mean 10AWG on a US style receptacle Furutech notwithstanding?

There's no other way really, heck I use rings actually even on 12AWG, you just get the transfer of current using bare connections.

 

Ring lugs are necessary for the ground, if the screw loosens, there's still some contact area, if a spade is used, the earth wire will most likely fall off.

Thank you 1 1/2. 

 

Not being handy with much of anything, I don't quite understand your answer. 

 

Yes, 10 gauge on an US style furutech receptacle. Here is a bit of material from Furutechs website. Check out the last two images.

 

spacer.png

 

The outlet accommodates spades or bare wire. It looks like it accepts bare wire up to 8 gauge.

 

I don't understand why Furutech says this on their website... (seems to me bare wire would be a superior connection to spades)

 

"- Furutech spade terminal FP-209 recommended for 10 AWG wire"

 

...and what other people who own the outlet did in their install.

 

Michael

 

 

 

 


FRONT END: Analog: Radikal Linn LP12 > Linn Urika 2 phono stage. Sound: Linn Klimax Katalyst DSM > Linn Duo amp >Maggie 3.7i  Wires + Power: Transparent: Reference Speaker, XL Power Conditioner + XL Power Cords. Furutech NFC Rhodium outlet on 10 gauge dedicated circuit with isolated ground Isolation: HRS SXR stand, M3X2 Bases. 
 

Connected to back end by: Transparent Ethernet 

 

BACK END: Digital: ,OpticalModule > EtherREGEN < Roon Nucleus +, QNAP HS251 Isolation: Salamander Archetype rack, HRS M3X2 base the under Nucleus, ER, NAS, Stillpoints under all others Power: Paul Hynes SR4 > ER, SR7 > Nucleus & NAS,  HDPlex200 > OpticalModule. Furutech NFC Rhodium outlet on 10 gauge dedicated circuit with isolated ground 

 

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A crimp on a ring or spades has tons of pressure applied  causing no oxygen to be trapped between the copper and the spade. The copper becomes a solid. The right tool needs to used, ratchet types are easier on the hand a n d have tremendous force.

 

In comparison,  direct connection of copper with a screwed connection by hand is the weakest. 


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5 minutes ago, One and a half said:

A crimp on a ring or spades has tons of pressure applied  causing no oxygen to be trapped between the copper and the spade. The copper becomes a solid. The right tool needs to used, ratchet types are easier on the hand a n d have tremendous force.

 

In comparison,  direct connection of copper with a screwed connection by hand is the weakest. 

So you vote for spades then.Your explanation make sense.

 


FRONT END: Analog: Radikal Linn LP12 > Linn Urika 2 phono stage. Sound: Linn Klimax Katalyst DSM > Linn Duo amp >Maggie 3.7i  Wires + Power: Transparent: Reference Speaker, XL Power Conditioner + XL Power Cords. Furutech NFC Rhodium outlet on 10 gauge dedicated circuit with isolated ground Isolation: HRS SXR stand, M3X2 Bases. 
 

Connected to back end by: Transparent Ethernet 

 

BACK END: Digital: ,OpticalModule > EtherREGEN < Roon Nucleus +, QNAP HS251 Isolation: Salamander Archetype rack, HRS M3X2 base the under Nucleus, ER, NAS, Stillpoints under all others Power: Paul Hynes SR4 > ER, SR7 > Nucleus & NAS,  HDPlex200 > OpticalModule. Furutech NFC Rhodium outlet on 10 gauge dedicated circuit with isolated ground 

 

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7 hours ago, One and a half said:

A crimp on a ring or spades has tons of pressure applied  causing no oxygen to be trapped between the copper and the spade.

 

I think this is mostly correct, but it is not "hermetically sealed" so of course there is oxygen intrusion and diffusion along all surfaces.  For our industrial instruments we use crimped connections and then solder over them.  The crimping, done correctly as you so rightly point out, provides a good smashing of the 2 metals together and the solder provides the atmospheric protection.  High integrity connections that never fail.  If you have any non-contact thermal analyzer (even cheap IR thermometer) you should check some screwed connections sometimes and see the heat generated by the connection resistance.   I have a buddy that makes a living testing electrical panels, etc., for loose connections causing excessive power loss.  He has a nice stereo from his proceeds! 😎

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The above dual receptacle has high-tech back-stab connections (very different from low-tech, low budget, spring-loaded back-stab connections). These high-tech back-stab connections would be my first choice. It's hard to get them wrong. Connections wrapping the wire around the screw or crimp-on lugs can and do go wrong.

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As those have said above, a heavily crimped spade would be better than bare wire. If bare, solid core would be best. However be careful of the receptacles that have the screw placed in-between two wire holes as the screwing down process would be slanted and not make a good connection with the wire. For this purpose it would be better to either directly solder the wire to the contact area or create a fish hook shape out of the bare wire to tunnel it down before pulling up for an even clamping pressure. Otherwise go with the spade method for simplicity. If you want more assurance, flux and solder after crimping onto the spade.


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Stab connectors are a bad idea...the connection point is narrow causing  higher failure rate over time from oxidization and conduction thermal heat. The only one that loves them are contractors wanting least labor cost. Positive (clamp) pressure with wide surface area contact is always the best

for minimizing oxidization  and thermal  heat issues over the lifetime of the electrical outlet. Let anyone who advises you otherwise

pay your homeowners fire insurance.


Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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13 hours ago, davide256 said:

Stab connectors are a bad idea...the connection point is narrow causing  higher failure rate over time from oxidization and conduction thermal heat.

Yes, back-stab connectors on bottom shelf receptacles are bad news.  But while the back holes in the above receptacles appear to be back-stabs, they are not.  They are alignment holes for the side-mount screw connectors.  Several good manufactures make this style top shelf receptacle. This style is my first choice.

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1 hour ago, Speedskater said:

Yes, back-stab connectors on bottom shelf receptacles are bad news.  But while the back holes in the above receptacles appear to be back-stabs, they are not.  They are alignment holes for the side-mount screw connectors.  Several good manufactures make this style top shelf receptacle. This style is my first choice.

Got it, looked at the internal video, you basically have to back the side screw off, insert wire then tighten the screw so that the internal plate clamps

on the wire... not a stab connection.


Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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