Jump to content
Ajax

Hi-Res - Does it matter? Blind Test by Mark Waldrep

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, gmgraves said:

Now it is possible to optimize one’s system for vinyl playback because there are so many variables. There’s the ‘table itself, the arm, the cartridge, the phono preamp, all of these affect playback quality, but with digital, you really only have the DAC and will not just affect playback of Hi-Res material, but of standard resolution material as well. You can’t separate the two. It’s like trying to optimize your phonograph set-up for 45 RPM LPs over 33.3 RPM LPs. The same equipment plays both and there is simply nothing you can do to make your system favor one over the other.

As we seem to be caught in a circular argument, there is no need to respond, Frank. I have nothing more to say on the subject, and you just seem to be restating your position, and I simply do not buy your conclusions. See you in another thread!

 

For someone who has played with electronics, George, you don't seem to have much insight as to what's going on 😉 ...you see, a DAC is a machine, just like a TT is a machine - and everyone who plays with machines knows that a particular beast will just do a better job with some 'materials', input for a myriad number of perhaps subtle reasons. Including making 45 RPM sound better than 33.3 RPM - didn't you know there is a whole mini industry doing special issues of 45's versions of 33 RPM material - because they "sound better", 😉.

 

It appears that you have a belief that digital audio, and DACs, are some type of impenetrable "magic" - not for mortal men to try and fathom the dark secrets within ... well, I don't have time for sort of thinking; a $100,000 DAC in a rig that makes it sound like crap is a piece of crap - and should be thrown in the bin if you "can't fix it". There are always subtleties that can make or break kit - my interest is in understanding why this occurs, in each particular instance.


Frank

 

http://artofaudioconjuring.blogspot.com/

 

 

Ahhh, Mankind ... Porsche intellect, Trabant emotions ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

Thanks for the correction. RMAF of course :~)

 

Very interesting topic.

 

Note to self, stop neurotic audiophiles form purposely damaging hearing in order to pass blind high resolution test. 

🙂

 

Looks like you've been to a few too many audiophile shows Chris...

 

As per other aspects of human cognition and perception, once we start looking at the extremes, deviating from the "neurotypical", we are bound to find a few cases here and there of remarkable abilities.

 

I suspect most of us would not necessarily desire to have such abilities if there is a price to pay like being able to enjoy the music and experience how it was meant to be heard! YMMV.


Archimago's Musings... A "more objective" audiophile blog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

most traits follow a bell shaped curve, or nearly so - not surprising when you realize most traits are quantitative or partly quantitative (not the Mendelian inheritance they "lied" to you about as a freshman)


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blokes spend too much time 'analysing' what to listen to - females who couldn't give a damn about the audiophile game, casually listening, are usually spot on; when it's 'off' they're quickly bored, and move on; when it's 'right', they hang around, and ask for other stuff to be played ...


Frank

 

http://artofaudioconjuring.blogspot.com/

 

 

Ahhh, Mankind ... Porsche intellect, Trabant emotions ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Archimago said:

🙂

 

Looks like you've been to a few too many audiophile shows Chris...

 

As per other aspects of human cognition and perception, once we start looking at the extremes, deviating from the "neurotypical", we are bound to find a few cases here and there of remarkable abilities.

 

I suspect most of us would not necessarily desire to have such abilities if there is a price to pay like being able to enjoy the music and experience how it was meant to be heard! YMMV.

It's a bit like wine, if you enjoy plonk, good for you, its much cheaper than a good Bordeaux, but please know you are not a connoisseur and are missing out big time and you're not qualified to advise others. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rexp said:

It's a bit like wine, if you enjoy plonk, good for you, its much cheaper than a good Bordeaux, but please know you are not a connoisseur and are missing out big time and you're not qualified to advise others. 


Or as I would say if you can’t tell me why  the former lead singer of the band Tool and Highway 47 are important in the wine world you are Just a wine snob. And unqualified.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rexp said:

 you are not a connoisseur

 

what kind of sewer?


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Rt66indierock said:


Or as I would say if you can’t tell me why  the former lead singer of the band Tool and Highway 47 are important in the wine world you are Just a wine snob. And unqualified.

A connoisseur is an expert in matters of taste, and a wine snob presumably buys wine on the basis of the label or cost, not sure your point? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Rexp said:

A connoisseur is an expert in matters of taste, and a wine snob presumably buys wine on the basis of the label or cost, not sure your point? 


I questioned your expertise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are no experts in matters of taste.

 

I hope you are familiar with the very strong effects of confirmation bias on wine "experts" tasting perceptions...  Hint: the label is critical.

 

Not to say that there aren't real differences.  I really like that Romanee plonk.


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Ralf11 said:

it may not be the impurities but the grain size for salts

 

mea culpa, I have 3 different kinds of salt + regular salt for cooking....

I concur, I have different grain sizes, for a salt and pepper steak or chicken I use large grains and larger lumps of pepper, you get a stronger hit of each as you encounter a piece, whereas finely ground pepper and salt gives you an overall salty/peppery taste. Depends on the dish and the taste experience you want.

A good example of expectation bias, was people being given cheese and onion in a salt and vinegar packet, they all got the flavour wrong!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, marce said:

I concur, I have different grain sizes, for a salt and pepper steak or chicken I use large grains and larger lumps of pepper, you get a stronger hit of each as you encounter a piece, whereas finely ground pepper and salt gives you an overall salty/peppery taste. Depends on the dish and the taste experience you want.

A good example of expectation bias, was people being given cheese and onion in a salt and vinegar packet, they all got the flavour wrong!

So you're an expert in the taste of salt? I mean in comparison to the average Joe who could care less? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, marce said:

A good example of expectation bias, was people being given cheese and onion in a salt and vinegar packet, they all got the flavour wrong!

Which brand? If it was the boring Walkers, I'm not surprised. There's hardly any correlation between the flavour name and the actual ingredients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apologies for the on topic post here, but has this "Hi-res" test actually started yet?  I signed up a while ago, but heard nothing since.  Has the test not started or have I missed something?

 

I notice that most posters in this thread have very established views, but I am interested in trying the test myself, if only for my own interest in what I can discern with my own ears in my own system.

 

I much prefer New World wines to a French Bordeaux by the way, but that's just me.


Windows 10 PC, Roon, HQPlayer, SOtM sMS-200Ultra, tX-USBultra, Paul Hynes SR4 (x2), Mutec REF10, Mutec MC3+USB, Devialet 1000Pro, KEF Blade.  Plus Pro-Ject Signature 12 TT for playing my 'legacy' vinyl collection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jabbr said:

 

It has been reported in the literature that ultrasonics can affect tinnitus. This is by definition a non-linear effect ie the ultrasonics are not directly heard, rather modulate the hearing system. 

 

The reason this is so important is that it provides a clear cut mechanism for the audibility of ultrasonics — not that you can hear, for example, a 30 kHz tone, rather that the full range sound of a cymbal might sound different than the 20 kHz stopband filtered recording of this cymbal. 

 

There are many people who are certain that Redbook CD contains all that we can possibly hear because of something they read about concerning the cochlea. The fact that ultrasonics modulate hearing means this belief is not grounded in certainty. 

Wasn't this only at very high sound levels where the ultrasound was making the air non linear?


To paraphrase Rick James, "sighted listening is a helluva drug".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...