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Article: The Value Proposition In Computer Audio: Front End Software

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iTunes is of interest b/c it is so common, and a consumers may well wonder if any features of free software (open source or not) will make it worth their while to change players

 

similarly, consumers are targeted with advertising from companies saying that their product will improve SQ over iTunes and should thus be purchased - IIRC, Audirvana is one (or something with an "A")

 

that's my interest anyway

 

based on the amount of trouble you went to, you must be retired -- hence, my "offering" another expanded project to you...


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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does your band use audiophile cables on the guitars?


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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I'm not sure which one is you...

 

Do you guys ever use a Hammond B3?

 

(I ask because as Berry Goldaqua once put it "major THD in the service of euphonic music is funky" - or something like that)

 

 


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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Thanks for the gig info... the Jamie's brunch thing sounds perfect... I signed up for the newsletter and will keep checking the schedules.

I am from the Allentown area... currently on the other side of the world... but get back often...

Regarding the blues - I think exposure to this music's history should be considered for integration into USA high school curriculums.. so much has evolved from its origins and development - and this important part of our culture seems not sufficiently appreciated.

Regarding the software study - wow - I think anyone considering these should check that list to save themselves some time.. for sure having a live music reference for comparison helps validate the impressions. Although it has been many years since I was standing aside a Leslie 5 nights a week, I still can use those memories' reference points along with the Fender Precisions, Strat's etc.... very valuable for stereo system analysis. 

My grandson got his first Fender for his 9th birthday a couple months ago - the granddaughter gets the electric piano for hers the end of this month  😉

I have found that Alexa is great for exposing kids to the joys of (our) music 😎

Hope to see you some Sunday soon!

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related question - what is the history of the Blues in Philly?


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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Foobar2000 (Linux, wine) with the upnp component for two of my thin client streamers. In my estimation the cheapest way to build DLNA/Openhome streamers (thin clients can be obtained for as low as $20 CAD).

 

rmel66.

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Thank you very much @Jud

 

As far as I know, iTunes will be replaced with an App in the near future.  I am sure all the DACs in the free world will then stop working  because some 22 year old code monkey in Cupertino forgot something.

 

Beware!


In any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake ~ Sayre's Law

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On 10/6/2019 at 2:54 PM, Ralf11 said:

related question - what is the history of the Blues in Philly?

 

The Delaware Valley (as the greater Philly area is known) has produced some world class blues people, but it's never been a center of blues culture.  We've produced some fabulous blues singers, songwriters, & players - but at least as many of the Philly blues elite are behind the big names a among them.  Philadelphians like Steve Guyger, Randy Lippincott, Jimmy Pritchard, (seen together in this video), Billy Baltera (Sonny Rhodes' guitar player for many years), Georgie Bonds, and many others have put out some fabulous music backing others and forging a local reputation.  But we've never had a strong regional blues club and concert scene to bring our own to the national forefront.

 

We had about half a dozen blues clubs from about 1990 to about 2010 - but they're sadly gone now (and most were demolished for coffee shops or condos).  Most were trashy bars like South Street Blues, where the band got $100 and free beer (regardless of the number of players in it).  In about 1993 or 4, an upscale club called Warmdaddy's opened and brought national blues talent through on a regular basis.  The club was nice and the  crowd was huge, truly eclectic, and delightful.  I loved playing there and was called as a sideman for many touring artists who picked up local pros for gigs.  We had Kenny Neal, Sista Monica, Chris Cain, Larry Garner, Luther Allison, etc.  

 

Because of Warmdaddy's success at the time, non-blues clubs started booking blues (e.g. Larry McCray played the Middle East Restaurant!).  But the scene dried up for a number of reasons.  Local club owners didn't go the extra mile to attract world class talent, they didn't increase the pay scale as worldwide demand for the performers grew, and it only took a few years for the big guys to stop coming here.  Crowds thinned as the shows shifted back to locals (who were not presented with the support and enthusiasm they needed to build their own crowds), and it became a downward spiral for most of those places.  WD's is still open, but it moved down to South Philly and simply doesn't have the variety and quality of blues that made it what it used to be.  By about 2010, I was driving up to Black Eyed Sally's in Hartford and Road's End Cafe in Hazelton (PA) for blues gigs and playing very few here.

 

We're experiencing a bit of a resurgence now, with 3 regular blues jams (Twisted Tail, Ashburner Inn, and Jamey's House of Music) supported by the Philly Blues Society.  More local bars are booking us again, so you can find live blues somewhere in the greater Philly area at least a few nights a week again.

 

Philly is and has always been a jazz town.  From the dawn of the jazz age, we've produced greats you know and love.  The Phildaelphia composer and bandleader Frank Johnson (1792-1844) was probably the first serious jazz maker of modern times, and by the early 1900s Philly was a center of jazz. Our own Eddie Lang was by most accounts the father of the jazz guitar (yeah, yeah, I know about Charlie Christian - but Lang was first and, in my opinion, better). Many moved here to hone their chops and become great: Dizzy, 'trane, Jimmy Heath, McCoy Tyner, Louis Jordan, Benny Golson, Clifford Brown, Bobby Timmons, Jimmy Smith, Buddy Defranco etc etc etc.  And we're still producing world class jazz today that's heard and loved around the world.

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Thanks - I've been thinking recently about cities in the US and their musical contributions...


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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I use a dedicated i7 2.6 GHz with 16MB RAM MAC Mini with a 1 GB SSD run on 12VDC.  I then use a AudioByte Hydra also run on 5VDC to send a AES signal to my DAC.   It's extremely quiet and really quick.   I think my rips sound cleaner & more detailed than listening to my Qobuz files.   After using Qobuz for almost a year, it's not worth the price over rips.

 

I find Roon allows me to listen to my collection way more than my vinyl days.  I believe Roon is the finest music you can use to explore and listen to your collection, read liner notes like the vinyl days and get reviews of the performers recordings.

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4 hours ago, LarryMagoo said:

I find Roon allows me to listen to my collection way more than my vinyl days.  I believe Roon is the finest music you can use to explore and listen to your collection, read liner notes like the vinyl days and get reviews of the performers recordings.


I too use Roon for pure listening enjoyment plus associated art & information far more than I do vinyl. But the vinyl experience has always been as much an enjoyable process (OK, maybe it’s a ritual) as it is a way to hear my music. I liken it to the fine art of tea, in which every step from selecting to prep to brewing to serving is an equal part of the pleasure. The ceremony is an integral part of the joy.

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bluesman,

 

You are right...it's a ritual...mine started with finding the album you want, pull out the special liner I bought from Mobile Fidelity, ....putting the album on my record cleaner, wash it with alcohol/water solution...then closing the lid to vacuum off the solution....then put it on the table, cue it up to cut(s) I wanted to hear, lower the tonearm...race back to MLP....because of this ritual, I did not listen to music as often as I'd like.

 

With Roon, it's so easy to listen to anything I want in a split second!!...Mick Jagger one second and the Rippingtons the next....plus no tic and pops, no stylus to wear out or wear out the record, no possible feedback from the tonearm when you really crank it up...

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On 10/9/2019 at 5:06 PM, LarryMagoo said:

bluesman,

 

You are right...it's a ritual...mine started with finding the album you want, pull out the special liner I bought from Mobile Fidelity, ....putting the album on my record cleaner, wash it with alcohol/water solution...then closing the lid to vacuum off the solution....then put it on the table, cue it up to cut(s) I wanted to hear, lower the tonearm...race back to MLP....because of this ritual, I did not listen to music as often as I'd like.

 

With Roon, it's so easy to listen to anything I want in a split second!!...Mick Jagger one second and the Rippingtons the next....plus no tic and pops, no stylus to wear out or wear out the record, no possible feedback from the tonearm when you really crank it up...

 

I love the 21st century!!!

 

PS: You forgot a critical part of the ritual: checking the jacket and sleeve for damage and trying to heal any with glue, tape, and/or prayer.

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