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I was born in Lisbon the year before the Revolution and grew up listening to protest music, some of it recorded in Paris by exiled artist who were wanted by the fascist regime, its lyrics ripe with double entendre...

 

 

5 minutes before 11pm on the 24th of April 1974, at the studios of Radio Alfabeta of the Associated Broadcasters of Lisbon, the service announcer João Paulo Dinis played the song "E depois do adeus" (And after the goodbye) by Paulo de Carvalho. It was the signal for the troops to advance.
The "password", composed by the song "Grândola, Vila Morena", by José Afonso, was recorded by Leite de Vasconcelos and aired by Manuel Tomás, as part of Radio Renascença's Limite program, at twenty past midnight, preceded by the reading of the first stanza:

 

“Grândola, vila morena

Terra da fraternidade,
O povo é quem mais ordena
Dentro de ti, ó cidade”

 

This second "password" from Radio Renascença, the national broadcasting corporation, served to inform all the barracks and military personnel joining the coup that everything was ready and going as planned.
The synchronized and irreversible Movement of the Armed Forces had been triggered.
Four hours later the radio was already the echo of freedom and the omen that all would be well.
Radio Clube Português is occupied by the military and transformed into the command post of the Movement of the Armed Forces; the station became known as the "Freedom Station".

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Remembering why Sinéad O'Connor tore up the pope's picture on national TV

 

Sinéad O'Connor performed an a cappella cover of Bob Marley's "War" on Saturday Night Live on October 3, 1992, rewriting a few of the lyrics to address child abuse, in addition to the song's initial topics of racism and the horrors of war.

 

As she finished the song, she produced and tore to shreds a photograph of Pope John Paul II, shouting, "Fight the real enemy!"

In his opening monologue the following week while hosting SNL, actor Joe Pesci insisted that had he been in charge of the show, he would have given O'Connor "such a smack." This echoed an event from the previous year when O'Connor insisted that the National Anthem not be played before her concert at a venue in New Jersey. Frank Sinatra, while performing at that same venue the next night, threatened to "kick her ass."

 

And Jonathan King, a millionaire British television and record producer, and the executive producer of the BPI Awards, stated in an interview with Billboard that she needed to be spanked for her display of bad manners. Ten years later, King would be convicted of several counts of sexual assault on 14- and 15-year-old boys and sentenced to seven years in prison.

 

By then O'Connor had already earned a reputation as something of a loose cannon and a crazy woman after a series of radical public acts. And in the popular cultural memory of the United States, O'Connor remains a crazy woman. Her act of speaking out against the Catholic Church with that bold action remains for many a hysterical act. What she did was intentionally incendiary.

 

Blowback from destroying a picture of the pope on live national television is to be expected and, one would imagine, desired. But at the time, the Saturday Night Live incident was not well understood. At the time, the public was largely unaware of the sex abuse crisis hiding within the church.

 

continues here -> https://www.pri.org/stories/2014-10-03/remembering-why-sinead-oconnor-tore-popes-picture-national-tv

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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The Politics of Bob Dylan

 

Forty years ago, on 26 October 1963, Bob Dylan premiered ‘The Times They are A-Changin”, his generational anthem, to a sold-out house at New York’s Carnegie Hall.

 

The song is founded on a conviction that the movement for social change is unstoppable, that history will conform to morality. In its second verse, Dylan issues a brash, enduring challenge to the punditocracy: “Come writers and critics/ Who prophesize with your pen/ And keep your eyes wide/ The chance won’t come again/ And don’t speak too soon/ For the wheel’s still in spin.”

 

It was the unexpected achievements of the civil rights movement, a grass-roots upsurge which transformed the American political landscape, that made this challenge and the song as a whole possible and even plausible. But it was Dylan’s genius to articulate the universal spirit animating the specific historical moment.

 

The protest songs that made Dylan famous and with which he continues to be associated were written in a brief period of some 20 months – from January 1962 to November 1963. Influenced by American radical traditions (the Wobblies, the Popular Front of the thirties and forties, the Beat anarchists of the fifties) and above all by the political ferment touched off among young people by the civil rights and ban the bomb movements, he engaged in his songs with the terror of the nuclear arms race, with poverty, racism and prison, jingoism and war. He also penned love songs that mingled delicate regret with brutal candour (“we never did much talkin’ anyway”).

 

continues here -> https://www.redpepper.org.uk/the-politics-of-bob-dylan/

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Loose talk around tables
Abandon all reason
Avoid all eye contact
Do not react
Shoot the messengers
 
This is a low flying panic attack
Sing the song of sixpence that goes
 
Burn the witch
Burn the witch
 

Radiohead’s ‘Burn The Witch’ Video – 5 Sinister References You May Have Missed

 

Since Radiohead’s ‘Burn The Witch’ video hit YouTube yesterday (May 3) much of the discussion around it has focussed on the inspirations behind its story and animation style – here are five comparison points to watch out for.

 

1. The Trumptonshire trilogy (1966-1969)

In the late sixties, three connected animated series – Camberwick Green, Trumpton, and Chigley – aired on the BBC, showing the way of life in idyllic little communities, and teaching children about community values. Those conventional lessons are something the video pillories by making its own values hideously screwed up. Some have even suggested the nod to Trumpton is, via its name, a reference to Donald Trump and his attitude towards anything outside America. Whether or not you think the reference can be taken that far, you’ll easily see the similarity between Camberwick Green and the ‘model village’ of the video.

 

2. The Wicker Man (1973)

The 1973 version of The Wicker Man – the better one, with Christopher Lee, not the 2006 one with Nicholas Cage – told the story of a devout Christian detective going to an island to investigate a disappearance. There, he finds a mad community of pagans indoctrinated by Lee’s laird, whose fruit farm’s success depends on pagan rituals, or so they believe. Among rituals like those you can see below, they also have a sacrificial effigy that houses a sacrifice – here and in the film, that’s the inspector.

This video is less explicit than the film, with the inspector climbing into the cage of his own accord, not being dragged into it, and at the end of the sequence he escapes, visible at the bottom left corner of the wide shot. In the film, he’s burnt to a crisp in front of the setting sun.
 

3. Medieval Practices

The menacing tone gets more bleakly anti-intellectual via medieval details such as the red crosses painted on doors – plague crosses that date back to 1665’s Great Plague of London – and what looks like a Beef Wellington made from an entire cow.

 

4. Jobe’s…

Throughout the video are crates of tomatoes, a reference to the empty crates of Summerisle Fruit in The Wicker Man. Here, those crates are full to bursting and are plastered with “Jobe’s”. One of these is also used to light the effigy at the end of the clip. One Redditor has pointed out a possible connection to a company that makes organic fertiliser for tomatoes. That might explain why the fruit has grown in this version of the Wicker Man tale… but it’s a bit of a stretch.

Another reaction has been the comparison to Job, the pious man punished by god as a test in various Abrahamic religions – but as may be obvious, that isn’t spelt Jobe.

 

5. ‘Dawn Chorus’

A key part of the video is the bird singing cheerily at its open and close, ignorant of the lyrics’ nightmarish vision of mob-like communities. Radiohead have recently formed a company called ‘Dawn Chorus LLP’, and another called ‘Dawnnchoruss Ltd’, a tactic they have employed before prior to an album release to minimise the effect its success or failure has on any of their other albums. Their social media shutdown took place on the first Sunday in May – International Dawn Chorus Day – and they have a song called ‘Dawn Chorus’, which in March 2009 Thom Yorke said he was “trying to finish” and was “really great.” If the video’s bird is a hint, hopefully we’ll be hearing ‘Dawn Chorus’ soon.


https://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/radioheads-burn-the-with-video-deciphered-8645

 

 

 

 

 

Decoding the Politics in Radiohead’s “Burn the Witch” Video

 

(...) Arriving at the current chaotic moment in global politics, though, and set in the quaint visual context of "Trumpton," the "Burn the Witch" video plays as a pointed critique of nativism-embracing leaders across the UK and Europe, perhaps even the show's near-namesake stateside (Donald Trump, anyone?). (...)

 

full text here -> https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/1133-decoding-the-politics-in-radioheads-burn-the-witch-video/


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Broken bottles under children's feet
Bodies strewn across the dead end street
But I won't heed the battle call
It puts my back up
Puts my back up against the wall

 

Sunday, Bloody Sunday

 

Bono Remembers the Real “Bloody Sunday”

 

In his latest New York Times op-ed piece, Bono relives his own experiences of “Bloody Sunday,” one of the deadliest days of “The Troubles” conflict between Northern Ireland and England, and celebrates the new British Prime Minister’s decision to take blame for the massacre. “Bloody Sunday,” the tragic event that inspired U2’s hit “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” took place January 30th, 1972, when members of the British Army opened fire on a group of unarmed civil rights protesters in the Northern Irish town of Derry, killing 14, including seven teenagers.

 

“It was a day that caused the conflict between the two communities in Northern Ireland — Catholic nationalist and Protestant unionist — to spiral into another dimension: every Irish person conscious on that day has a mental picture of Edward Daly, later the bishop of Derry, holding a blood-stained handkerchief aloft as he valiantly tended to the wounded and the dying,” Bono writes.

 

Last week, new British Prime Minister David Cameron admitted that the British Army acted unlawfully on that day 38 years ago, opening the door for possible criminal charges. Bono called Cameron’s revelation “a bright day on our small rock in the North Atlantic.” “Clouds that had hung overhead for 38 years were oddly missing … the sharp daylight of justice seemed to chase away the shadows and the stereotypes of the past. No one behaved as expected. The world broke rhyme,” Bono writes. “A brand-new British prime minister, still in his wrapping paper, said things no one had imagined he would … could … utter ….’On behalf of our country, I am deeply sorry.’

 

continues here - > https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/bono-remembers-the-real-bloody-sunday-243754/

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Mother do you think they'll drop the bomb
Mother do you think they'll like the song
Mother do you think they'll try to break my balls
Ooooh aah, Mother should I build a wall


Mother should I run for president
Mother should I trust the government
Mother will they put me in the firing line
Ooooh aah, is it just a waste of time

 

I think that Trump must have a listened to this one a lot when he was as a child... And he obviously never grew up.

 

The Wall

 

Though it in no way endangers the meisterwerk musical status of Dark Side of the Moon (still on the charts nearly seven years after its release), Pink Floyd’s twelfth album, The Wall, is the most startling rhetorical achievement in the group’s singular, thirteen-year career. Stretching his talents over four sides, Floyd bassist Roger Waters, who wrote all the words and a majority of the music here, projects a dark, multilayered vision of post-World War II Western (and especially British) society so unremittingly dismal and acidulous that it makes contemporary gloom-mongers such as Randy Newman or, say, Nico seem like Peter Pan and Tinker Bell.

 

The Wall is a stunning synthesis of Waters’ by now familiar thematic obsessions: the brutal misanthropy of Pink Floyd’s last LP, Animals; Dark Side of the Moon‘s sour, middle-aged tristesse; the surprisingly shrewd perception that the music business is a microcosm of institutional oppression (Wish You Were Here); and the dread of impending psychoses that runs through all these records — plus a strongly felt antiwar animus that dates way back to 1968’s A Saucerful of Secrets. But where Animals, for instance, suffered from self-centered smugness, the even more abject The Wall leaps to life with a relentless lyrical rage that’s clearly genuine and, in its painstaking particularity, ultimately horrifying.

 

continues here -> https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-album-reviews/the-wall-188348/

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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It was a packed house that night at the intimate Coliseu dos Recreios in Lisbon when this shy young singer walked on stage with her guitar. This was 1989 and I was in my mid teens. The singer-songwriter got down to business straight away, but in spite of her lack of ability to connect with the audience the atmosphere was electrifying.

 

People say it doesn't exist
Cause no one would like to admit
That there is a city underground
Where people live everyday
Off the waste and decay
Off the discards of their fellow man


Here in subcity life is hard
We can't receive any government relief
Won't you please, please give the President my honest regards
For disregarding me

 

Tracy Chapman’s Black and White World

A powerful new voice sings out about racism and poverty

 

“The world’s a mess,” says Tracy Chapman flashing a winning smile and then breaking into laughter. The 24-year-old singer-songwriter is well aware of her reputation for seriousness, and she has just stopped herself, nearly breathless, after railing against a catalog of social ills. Chapman, whose powerful debut album, Tracy Chapman, addresses such issues as racism and violence against women, is perfectly capable of laughing at herself. What she is not interested in doing is lightening up her music.

 

“I didn’t know that you had to have a percentage of humor on every album you put out,” she says, joking that perhaps her next record should be a “comedy album.” “I don’t know that you can necessarily be humorous about some of the issues that I deal with in my songs,” she continues. “I don’t know that it serves them very well to dilute things in that way.”

 

No need to worry – the 11 songs on Tracy Chapman are as undiluted as they could be. The production is subtle and streamlined, focused unyieldingly on Chapman’s acoustic guitar, her bluesy voice and her carefully wrought tales of characters in contemporary America who seek meaning in the face of society’s fragmentation. Chapman is equally direct about her political beliefs: “Poor people gonna rise up/And get their share/Poor people gonna rise up/And take what’s theirs,” she insists on the album’s opening track, “Talkin’ bout a Revolution.” Sentiments like these have led critics to view Chapman as a bridge between the Eighties folk revival and the more socially conscious folk movement of the Sixties.

 

continues here -> https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/tracy-chapmans-black-and-white-world-75878/

 

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Why do we build the wall?
My children, my children
Why do we build the wall?
 
Why do we build the wall?
We build the wall to keep us free
That's why we build the wall
We build the wall to keep us free
 
How does the wall keep us free?
My children, my children
How does the wall keep us free?
 
How does the wall keep us free?
The wall keeps out the enemy
And we build the wall to keep us free

That's why we build the wall
We build the wall to keep us free
 
Who do we call the enemy?
My children, my children
Who do we call the enemy?
 
Who do we call the enemy?
The enemy is poverty
And the wall keeps out the enemy
And we build the wall to keep us free
That's why we build the wall
We build the wall to keep us free
 
Because we have and they have not!
My children, my children
Because they want what we have got!
 
Because we have and they have not!
Because they want what we have got!
The enemy is poverty
And the wall keeps out the enemy
And we build the wall to keep us free
That's why we build the wall
We build the wall to keep us free
 
What do we have that they should want?
My children, my children
What do we have that they should want?
 
What do we have that they should want?
We have a wall to work upon!
We have work and they have none
And our work is never done
My children, my children
And the war is never won
The enemy is poverty
And the wall keeps out the enemy
And we build the wall to keep us free
That's why we build the wall
We build the wall to keep us free
We build the wall to keep us free

 

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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58 minutes ago, Norton said:

I remember  a friend telling me me how he was in tears at this performance:

 

“On August 21, 1968, in a cruelly ironic piece of programming, Rostropovich was scheduled to play the Czech composer Dvorák's Cello Concerto at the Proms. Earlier that day, Soviet tanks had rolled into Prague to crush Alexander Dubcek's liberal reforms. 

To compound the irony, Rostropovich's accompanists were a Soviet orchestra (the USSR State Symphony) under a Soviet conductor (Evgeny Svetlanov). Despite vociferous objections, the concert went ahead. I have it on tape. During the concerto's hushed opening, the Royal Albert Hall resounds to strident yells of protest. It must have been a nightmare for the cellist, yet Rostropovich proceeds to give a performance of such seething intensity that no one could have left the hall with any doubt about his feelings towards the invasion”

From Julian Lloyd Webber’s piece here: 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/classicalmusic/3592296/First-person-singular-the-night-Rostropovichs-cello-talked-politics.html

 

I have that recording! I wish I had the booklet with me...

 

There's a nice little radio piece about it on the BBC website:

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/music/articles/1ec50bd1-515f-421c-b69a-7611335c4e3b


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Clearly I remember
Pickin' on the boy

Seemed a harmless little fuck
But we unleashed the lion
Gnashed his teeth and bit the recessed lady's breast

How could I forget
And he hit me with a surprise left
My jaw left hurting

Dropped wide open
Just like the day
Oh like the day I heard
Daddy didn't give affection

And the boy was something that mommy wouldn't wear
King Jeremy the wicked
Ruled his world

Jeremy spoke in class today

 

Mother of the Teen Who Inspired Pearl Jam's 'Jeremy' Speaks Out

 

For the first time since her son Jeremy's death in 1991, Wanda Crane is speaking about her loss. Until now, the public has known him only as the protagonist of the Pearl Jam song that bears his name.

 

Frontman Eddie Vedder had picked up the story from a newspaper article that detailed how the nearly 16-year-old Jeremy Delle who committed suicide by gunshot in front of his English class in Richardson, Texas. It became inspiration for the song, the third single off the band's debut album, Ten. "Jeremy" reached No. 5 on both the Mainstream and Modern Rock Billboard charts.

 

continues here -> https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pearl-jam-jeremy-mother/

 

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Thank you clearly defining my hesitations.  To write a song about the young man without, and I won't use his words in that article, direct context or research for purely commercialized reasons is not so reflective of protesting the larger subject either. 

 

I wonder if you were aware I posted the single of this song in Album of the Evening recently?

 

Original photo used as cover art.

spacer.png

 

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The Irish Troubles dominated the news while I was growing up.  U2, with mulitple songs, and The Cranberries (Zombie) dominated the dialogue.  I am old enough to go back to Viet Nam as my father served multiple tours as a Navigator and Back Seat airman...which gives The End (The Doors), Gimmie Shelter (The Stones), and What About Me (Quicksilver Messenger Service).   

 

Thank you for this thread...I am not a very good written/spoken person but the music I enjoy/think and react to is emotional and this thread typifies those emotions.


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For me the last (I still hope not) important rock protest album.

 

 

And one of the most important protest ..instrumentals.

 

 

5 hours ago, rando said:

Whatever thoughts I might have on the protest song.  This topic wouldn't be quite complete without this little ditty.

 

 

 

Made me think about Woody Guthrie who has written countless great protest songs (and of course was an inspiration for many including Bob Dylan). Just one of them.

I apologize for the choice of the video but there is only one version of this song on Youtube - it's obviously not about Donald but about his father - Frederick Christ..

 

 


The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

                                                                          ―  William Shakespeare.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, rando said:

To write a song about the young man without, and I won't use his words in that article, direct context or research for purely commercialized reasons is not so reflective of protesting the larger subject either. 

 

Or as a way to express how you were moved by a particular event, as artists often do.


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Specious in comparison to Bob Marley being the rallying call for peace his country rallied around.  Or some of your other significant examples above.  Which I apologize for interrupting the ongoing progress of.

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20 hours ago, rando said:

Specious in comparison to Bob Marley being the rallying call for peace his country rallied around. Or some of your other significant examples above. 

 

I agree entirely.


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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Difficult choice, so much to choose from...
 
Excuse me Mr.
Do you have the time
Or are you so important
That it stands still for you
 
Excuse me Mr. won't you
Lend me your ear
Or are you not only blind
But do you not hear
 
Excuse me Mr., but
Isn't that your oil in the sea
And the pollution in the air Mr.
Whose could that be
 
So excuse me Mr.
But I'm a mister too
And you're givin' Mr. a bad name
Mr. like you
 

Ben Harper, Reluctant Protest Singer

On his new album, Call It What It Is, the musician reflects on police brutality, ageing, and a pink balloon.

 

Ben Harper has been handcuffed and forced to the ground, his face kissing the pavement, twice: once in the ’80s and again in the ’90s. In 1999, he was driving through Burbank, California, on his way to the studio when he spotted a helicopter. “God,” he remembers thinking, “that helicopter is really flying close to me.” He kept driving and the helicopter kept tailing him. He got off the freeway and encountered some roadblocks, which he navigated his way around, and pulled into the parking lot of Alpha Studios, where he was going to record a song called “Steal My Kisses” for Burn to Shine, his fourth album.

 

Immediately, as Harper recalls, “I’m freakin’ surrounded by no less than 20 cops and a helicopter, like, 15 feet above my head.” The police had gotten a call about a stolen truck. Which was blue. “My truck is gold. All right? Guns drawn, helicopter above, face down, cuffed. I said, Well, all you had to do was pull me over, all you had to do was run my license plate.”

 

J.P. Plunier, Harper’s producer (and childhood friend), was on his way to the same studio, driving in from Claremont. He turned on the radio for a traffic report and, as he hurtled closer to Burbank, heard that his exit was closed due to police activity. That’s when he saw the helicopter. When he finally got to the studio, Plunier learned, to his irritation, that his friend was late.

 

“So I went, got a cup of coffee, came back out, Ben pulls in, and all of a sudden the whole place is surrounded by police,” he says. “Ben was on the ground and cuffed.” The studio was bordered by a wall, perhaps 12 feet high. And on the wall were sharpshooters. It was, Plunier says, a situation that could have easily taken a bloody turn.

 

Thankfully, the police were quickly persuaded that Harper, rather than being a truck thief, was instead a victim of mistaken identify. Later that day, Harper says, “the police captain came down to apologize, literally hat in hand.”

 

continues here -> https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/03/ben-harper-reluctant-protest-singer/475173/

 

 


"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira Pascoaes

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