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Is classical music streaming better with video?

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3 hours ago, AnotherSpin said:

I prefer any kind of music without video.

I upvoted your post and then cancelled it.  In general, I agree but I still enjoy opera and ballet with video.


Kal Rubinson

Music in the Round

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

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7 minutes ago, Kal Rubinson said:

I upvoted your post and then cancelled it.  In general, I agree but I still enjoy opera and ballet with video.

 

Ballet is all about beauty in motion, it needs to be seen. Not so easy with opera. While some staged performances might be truly great, in many other cases it would be not so easy to juxtapose sublime voices with mundane visual representation.

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15 minutes ago, AnotherSpin said:

Ballet is all about beauty in motion, it needs to be seen.

Ballet has a musical and a visual element. Both together provide the best experience, but either can be enjoyable by itself as well.

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8 minutes ago, mansr said:

Ballet has a musical and a visual element. Both together provide the best experience, but either can be enjoyable by itself as well.

 

Of course. There are even some ballets which are more interesting by its music, rather than dance. Still, ballet is the art of dance first. I am not so sure it will make sense to listen only to dvd's with Rudolf Nureyev or Pina Bausch company without watching.

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1 minute ago, AnotherSpin said:

Of course. There are even some ballets which are more interesting by its music, rather than dance. Still, ballet is the art of dance first. I am not so sure it will make sense to listen only to dvd's with Rudolf Nureyev or Pina Bausch company without watching.

Of course there are examples where the music plays a distinctly secondary part. That doesn't mean Tchaikovsky, for instance, without the visuals isn't worth hearing.

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11 hours ago, Musicophile said:

I just signed up again to the BPO digital concert hall that I had stopped subscribing to a while ago. 

 

Right now I’m just browsing through the back catalog while waiting for Petrenko to start his inaugural concert. 

 

While skipping through some of the content I’m just wondering what you think, is the addition of video to the music experience a real added value?

 

The more I’m browsing the more I notice that I find the video stream more distracting than anything else. Particularly given that the DCH video team really loves closeups. 

 

What do you think? Is classical music streaming better with video?

 

I cancelled my Spotify Premium and my Qobuz HiFi accounts, because other than checking out a few new releases, I found them not all that useful for me in light of my listening habits and large CD/SACD collection.  That said, I think watching concerts via a streaming service would interest me.  It would certainly be something different from my own physical collection.  I only have a couple of dozen or so filmed classical performances on DVD or Blu-ray.

 

I subscribed to the Metropolitan Opera service for a while, but there weren't enough of my favorite performers to make it worthwhile long-term.  I'll have to check the BPO service, that sounds like it might be a good fit for me, as I have enjoyed many recordings by that orchestra through the years.  I don't think I'd want classical video as my primary source of music, but as an adjunct to my audio collection, I think it could be terrific.  Definitely for a more casual mode of listening, due to the distraction of video, but good for the right mood.  Thanks for starting this discussion!


请教别人一次是5分钟的傻子,从不请教别人是一辈子的傻子

"I know I chatter on far too much...but if you only knew how many things I want to say and don't, you'd give me some credit!"  -Anne of Green Gables

 

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For me it adds something to watch the players (and depending on the ensemble, a conductor). I  don't keep my eyes shut at a live concert.


One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> router -> 2 Cisco switches connected by optical Ethernet -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen (powered by LPS-1) -> Ghent JSSG360 USB cable -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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I agree with what was said about Ballet (not my favorite art form, but it is clearly also a visual art) and partially for opera. 

 

But for a symphonic or soloist performance the visual information is much less relevant at least to me. 

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1 minute ago, Musicophile said:

I agree with what was said about Ballet (not my favorite art form, but it is clearly also a visual art) and partially for opera. 

 

But for a symphonic or soloist performance the visual information is much less relevant at least to me. 

 

Less relevant, yes. But, it would be distracting and irritating even. When I first saw Keith Jarrett's video after listening his recordings for many years I was... disappointed. This is not the only example.

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I've long been fond of Classical Arts Showcase model of freely offered artistic programming.  Rarely is the focus on performances so modern SQ at 48k television broadcast quality detracts from the overall experience.  Lack of any non-artistic content other than station identification and content advisement is also a very notable draw.  

 

Many of the live independent or collaborative efforts continue to fall short.  Personal branding and social media are a corporate event so far removed from, by which I mean impossibly PC and sensitive to impossible standards of conduct, reality of these organizations draw.  I never lack for reasons the entire atmosphere falls so short of what made radio and early televised performances relevant while being correct and family appropriate.  No small part of which can be ascribed to a post-war renewal of efforts by performers and audience.

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5 hours ago, AnotherSpin said:

 

Less relevant, yes. But, it would be distracting and irritating even. When I first saw Keith Jarrett's video after listening his recordings for many years I was... disappointed. This is not the only example.

 

Glenn Gould would probably be similar. But of course it's hardly their fault they don't look as you pictured them when they made the sounds you love.

 

Using an example from another type of music, I’d be eager to watch video of Hendrix to see how he produced the sounds he did.

 

Players with unusual technique are for me an example of how one can learn from watching as well as listening.


One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> router -> 2 Cisco switches connected by optical Ethernet -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen (powered by LPS-1) -> Ghent JSSG360 USB cable -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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One other aspect of what @Musicophile said that interests me goes beyond the simple idea that video can be distracting.

 

The examples I gave before were of being able to see techniques of individual players. @Musicophile mentioned frequent closeups of particular ensemble members being a distraction. This might be similar to a complaint I have about sports television, which is that it follows the ball, like schoolchildren, depriving us of the chance to see other important strategic developments. In broadcasts of orchestras, the camera always seems to be focused on the instruments playing loudest, depriving us of the chance to watch the development of counterpoints and harmonies.


One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> router -> 2 Cisco switches connected by optical Ethernet -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen (powered by LPS-1) -> Ghent JSSG360 USB cable -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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36 minutes ago, Jud said:

One other aspect of what @Musicophile said that interests me goes beyond the simple idea that video can be distracting.

 

The examples I gave before were of being able to see techniques of individual players. @Musicophile mentioned frequent closeups of particular ensemble members being a distraction. This might be similar to a complaint I have about sports television, which is that it follows the ball, like schoolchildren, depriving us of the chance to see other important strategic developments. In broadcasts of orchestras, the camera always seems to be focused on the instruments playing loudest, depriving us of the chance to watch the development of counterpoints and harmonies.

 

Yes. Even I can not play any musical instrument, I can watch Martha Argerich fingers movement with great admiration. To certain extent, of course, before her artistry takes me away from simple visual joys. Or, video coverage of Fare Thee Well concerts series was immensely touching, video part was indispensable, imho.

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Well, I have been able to come to a conclusion. Kirill Petrenko’s debut with the Berlin Phil, Beethoven’s 9th, was broadcast from the Brandenburg Gate. It was evening in Berlin, and the setting was beautiful as I watched and listened to the first two movements through lunch.

 

Then I went out to plant some flowers, and I listened to the third and fourth movements looking at flowers, butterflies, hummingbirds and mountains in the desert sun.

 

Which is best? Both, definitely both.


One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> router -> 2 Cisco switches connected by optical Ethernet -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen (powered by LPS-1) -> Ghent JSSG360 USB cable -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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7 hours ago, Jud said:

Well, I have been able to come to a conclusion. Kirill Petrenko’s debut with the Berlin Phil, Beethoven’s 9th, was broadcast from the Brandenburg Gate. It was evening in Berlin, and the setting was beautiful as I watched and listened to the first two movements through lunch.

 

Then I went out to plant some flowers, and I listened to the third and fourth movements looking at flowers, butterflies, hummingbirds and mountains in the desert sun.

 

Which is best? Both, definitely both.

 

I'd love to see such a broadcast.

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