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Music therapy for early-onset dementia

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5 hours ago, rando said:

instead of hard science.

 

As if you know the first thing about how to evaluate "hard science."

 

 


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5 hours ago, rando said:

Expected this to be based on the studies surrounding sub-bass.  Since he is drumming as part of his music therapy I suppose it partially does.  The focus of this article was predominantly on choral singing and quality of life instead of hard science.

 

It is a pretty large jump to associate self stimulative behavior in this context. It is just another factor to be dealt with. 


Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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17 hours ago, Paul R said:

 

It is a pretty large jump to associate self stimulative behavior in this context. It is just another factor to be dealt with. 

 

It is a pretty large jump to associate self stimulative behavior in the context of audio quality.  It is just another factor to be dealt with. 🙃

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35 minutes ago, wgscott said:

 

Do us both a favor and keep your random-word salads out of my threads.  The only thing lost on me is the assertion that anything you type constitutes a "reasonable discussion."  "Self-stimulatory," however, seems to be quite appropriate to describe your activities.

 

Please do not be above the things in such a manner. I am welcoming rando's input in any discussion. Be kind.

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1 minute ago, Paul R said:

 

You probably don't have special needs kids then, or aging parents, or worries about Alzheimer.  Really, it isn't funny at all.

 

My daughter is 36 now, and trust me, while all those years have been a blessing, they have also been *anything* but easy. Music is definitely one of the things my daughter loves.

 

-Paul 

 

 

No reason to look for a black cat in a dark room. I appreciate everybody's input in any tread.

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31 minutes ago, AnotherSpin said:

 

No reason to look for a black cat in a dark room. I appreciate everybody's input in any tread.

 

Never have understood that saying. In any case, it was somewhat offensive, though those without the referents to understand may find it puzzling.

 

Perhaps you two should go make up a thread where you pick on disabled people? I am sure nobody would find that offensive.

 

I meant that sarcastically even initially put a smile behind it. But in 2019, I am not so sure anymore. The President want's to monitor disabled people to be sure they are not too "happy." What other kind of effing  weirdness is going to show up? 

 

-Paul 

 

 

Edited by Paul R
Edited out bad language.

Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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2 hours ago, AnotherSpin said:

 

Please do not be above the things in such a manner. I am welcoming rando's input in any discussion. Be kind.

 

The guy has attacked me like a psychotic previously.  I prefer he stays out.  He contributes nothing positive.  Feel free to start your own thread and he can bring his shopping cart and scream at shadows.


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Do facts matter?

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you can ask Chris for the ability to moderate any thread you start, and delete him - I've found it works well


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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1 hour ago, Ralf11 said:

 

And so, we come full circle back to 1697 with William Congreave's:

 

"Musick has Charms to sooth a savage Breast,
To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak."

 

 


Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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On 5/3/2019 at 1:28 AM, wgscott said:

As if you know the first thing about how to evaluate "hard science."

 

I suppose it is allowed to contribute in this thread with real-life experiences ?

Say that I'd dive into scientific articles or so-called "doctor" sites for help on the matter, would you think real help is provided from there ? (hint: not).

 

Anyway ... (and with the notion it is very tough for me to write in English on a subject like this)

 

While an article like this may give pointers for further exploration, it could be a community like CA which forms more strong settlement on the matter(s). But one must recognize it ...

 

OK, that was vague. I will try to come up with more substance.

 


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2 hours ago, PeterSt said:

The thought of music being a great aid for people with (certain types of ?) dementia is at least a few years old by now. As far as I know, some scientific research currently limits to accidental findings like with the choir thing, or people (observed in a group of hospitalization) getting more responsive when music (of their past ?) is playing. With this latter I mainly refer to those sitting in a chair the whole day, them hardly moving. So from there, people like us - dealing with music a lot - could see through more of this all, once we know it could be going on. And from there, for example I myself indeed do see such things happening.

 

Say that in my family there is a "she" who is subject to being prone to have the disease for several reasons (like inheritance but not officially diagnosed (yet)). Now there's me and I coincidentally saw such a (BBC) program on TV and so I start to observe;

The key thing here is that I am ahead of possible dementia times in the "she" and so I am there right from the possible start of it.

 

To jump right to the end: the more the disease expresses the more crazy "she" gets about knowing the history of songs involved. To me it seems impossible that one "is" a walking dictionary about all what happens with songs and when they came out and who the singer and guitarist etc. etc. was ... but the more the disease progresses the better she gets at it.

And all else starts to fail more and more.

 

Because the happening (of normally playing music) is reoccurring say on a weekly basis, it is easy to see the progress (on song recognition) because what wasn't recognized at all a year ago, today is (same songs, I mean). This is really weird to experience.

It is also weird to experience that from an article like the one subject to the OP, you (and maybe many people more) can see that something really is at work there. But, be not too late like with my experience. I mean, this is not at all about someone sitting in a chair the whole day. But, at some day that may happen. What I now foresee is that "she" can stay in more normal circles of life by means of playing that game of "what song is this ?" ... which is just playing music of old times (like from the youth). There's great attention and focus, which otherwise is (as it seems) explicitly lost.

 

As if all the brain activity slowly shifts to the auditory system ...

 

As far as I can tell this is just a person like you and me and the neighbors who ever back went to school and parties and was normally subject to music. Nothing special there.

 

Thanks Peter. -Paul 

 


Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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