Jump to content

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Some of those stats are very impressive, for opposite reasons...

 

Not surprising given the stats above, the original drive in my 2011 Mac mini is still going strong. It identifies itself as a:  TOSHIBA MK5065GSXF 500GB 5400rpm drive. Pretty much constant use.


No electron left behind...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a WD 1TB HDD running since 2008, still going, never a bad sector.  Starting to feel like that episode of Seinfeld stretching a tank of gas.  I don't actually trust it for anything important anymore, just keep it running out of principle.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, BrokeLinuxPhile said:

Have a WD 1TB HDD running since 2008, still going, never a bad sector.  Starting to feel like that episode of Seinfeld stretching a tank of gas.  I don't actually trust it for anything important anymore, just keep it running out of principle.

 

 

I have an old Firewire 400 drive I bought from OWC that fits that description as well. I would never trust it for anything, but man that thing has been going forever. Short of opening it up though, I have no way to tell what manufacturers drive is in the enclosure.


No electron left behind...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

This is always an informative read. 

 

https://www.backblaze.com/blog/backblaze-hard-drive-stats-q1-2019/

 

756AE0B5-FECA-4AEB-87EE-5AAD70252813.png

There is barely any statistically relevant information in that table. For meaningful results, you would need to take a large number of drives of each model and run them until something like 50% have failed while each month recording the number failed so far. Or something like that. One or two failures over a short period tells us nothing, especially when we don't know the age distribution of the drives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heat is a big enemy of electronics. Proper cooling changes numbers for the better... good spacing between drives and front/back fans will create an optimal environment for drive longevity.


Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got half dozen WDC 500gb Western Digital Caviar Black used for OS testing and audio/video storage. All have been in service for 8-10 years. Never had a failure with a WD drive. All important data gets backed up regularly but never had to use it. Knock Wood.

Main Linux workstation OS is on a 10 year old OCZ VERTEX 60gb SSD, so far so good with that also.  Here's a couple SMART reports.

 

WDC 500gb Black Caviar  25,00+ hours

1285869588_Screenshotat2019-05-0112-07-50.thumb.png.a1ab8a432f7f76b505380d7e41fcc794.png

1250036130_Screenshotat2019-05-0112-17-52.thumb.png.ea178ef37df877f495a4f6757b6f6490.png

 

 

 

OCZ Vertex 60gb

1488809463_Screenshotat2019-05-0112-08-49.thumb.png.92e4d736582549bcd59a186edd8d7dad.png

 


"The gullibility of audiophiles is what astonishes me the most, even after all these years. How is it possible, how did it ever happen, that they trust fairy-tale purveyors and mystic gurus more than reliable sources of scientific information?"

Peter Aczel - The Audio Critic

no-mqa-sm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

I encourage you to read the linked post for further details. 

 

I second that. @mansr they have dealt with your concerns in the article.


No electron left behind...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just using server drives that have high GB/month transfer rating, designed for 24/7 server use and have at least 60 months warranty. They also tend to have some extra protections and such.

 

Now I have for example 8 TB Seagate IronWolf Pro. And also some WD Red Pro's. Also from SSD side for example Samsung's Pro-series drives have been pretty good running in mirrored setup.

 


Signalyst - Developer of HQPlayer

Pulse & Fidelity - Software Defined Amplifiers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Figured I would give this a day to be discussed before piling on another layer @mansr has already voiced his technical concerns on (and need not repeat).

 

For my money the fun drive survey is this Russian SSD test.  There is in constant use since new and "In constant use."  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had many HD. The old one's became back-up drive. Once the back-up drive failed. It was a Seagate 750 gb. Nvm, I have plenty of drives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm using inexpensive drives in a NAS.

 

In five years, two drives have failed so maybe I should change my ways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, any drive brand can be good or bad. I had a WD drive, that was built during the time that they had huge issues with quality and reliability. I still have that drive (it is only a 500 GB drive but it has lasted over 10 years). I now use it as back up 3 for my music files.


Current:  JRiver 24 on Win 10 PC (AMD Ryzen 5 2600 with 32 GB RAM) or Daphile on an I5-2500K with 16 GB RAM

DAC - TEAC UD-501 DAC 

Pre-amp - Audio Research SP-16

Amplification - PS Audio S300

Speakers: Wharfedale Linton Heritage

Cables:Tara Labs and DiMarzio Interconnects

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2019 at 1:13 PM, bobbmd said:

just replaced my WD 2TB HD with 4TB Samsung SSD HD any comments-- good or bad? suggested by tech at my 'authorized' Apple repair shop

Take a pair of dice and give them a roll. The number you get is the number of years your new drive will last.

Works without fail.  ;)


"The gullibility of audiophiles is what astonishes me the most, even after all these years. How is it possible, how did it ever happen, that they trust fairy-tale purveyors and mystic gurus more than reliable sources of scientific information?"

Peter Aczel - The Audio Critic

no-mqa-sm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Sal1950 LOL- the last one,the WD lasted until it filled up so at my age the SSD  should last a lifetime--- as my CFO stated when she saw I signed up for ROON's 'Lifetime subscription'--- "what the hell does that mean...?" she was not pleased but it has paid for itself and now look what they are charging!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never had a failed drive until very recently. Killed two WD NAS and a laptop Drive within a span of 1 week. I was transferring large data just prior to that and it may have caused the failure. Best practice is to have two back ups and replace drive every 5 years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All kidding aside, I've never had a HD fail since I started using computers around 1998.

I've always bought WD drives when I used spinners, there are still 2 500g spinning in this box I'm on that are around 13 yo and a OCZ Vertex SSD that is 10+ yo. GSmart reports the SSD as having "72% Life Remaining", whatever that means. LOL


"The gullibility of audiophiles is what astonishes me the most, even after all these years. How is it possible, how did it ever happen, that they trust fairy-tale purveyors and mystic gurus more than reliable sources of scientific information?"

Peter Aczel - The Audio Critic

no-mqa-sm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some 5 - 6 failed drives in storage now. And some close-failure ones as well. One WD Red Pro was replaced on warranty after it failed after couple of weeks use. But usually drives fail on 24/7 use a bit after warranty has expired. I use only drives that have 5 year warranty.

 

Most recent failure was WD's 2 TB SSD that started to fail and I replaced it before it went out of business completely, it was about 3 years old and had been running 24/7.

 

Now I've replaced WD Red Pro's with Seagate IronWolf Pro's. Time will show how those last.

 


Signalyst - Developer of HQPlayer

Pulse & Fidelity - Software Defined Amplifiers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...