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Furutech FI-68 - IEC connector and power filter

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I could not find any information about this power filter/IEC conector (aside from official web-site info).

As I can undertand it is basically an extended version of Furutech FI-28 IEC connector with integrated AC-1501 RFI/EMI filter. Looks like FI-68 is very similar to Flow-28 (but without cable and additional IEC inlet, which is good - less unnecessary parts, better sound).

Could you please clarify a few questions:

1) Is this really FI-28 + AC-1501 in one case?
2) Has anybody tried/heard this device at work? How does it sound in comparison with mere IEC connectors like FI-28 or Oyaide C-046/079?
3) Some power filters may change tonal balance a bit. What about FI-68? Is it transparent?
4) Can it supply power amps (and power regenerators) without dynamic compression?

 

Found pics of FI-68 internals:

1621757936_FI-68(G)5.thumb.jpg.cd070ae5cc0e405a27999cff28fb7d49.jpg

1346665893_FI-68(G)6.thumb.jpg.a1b5955738139e51d8911465ac06560f.jpg

Looks like there is AC-1501, but slighly different version.

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With a tiny little filter like that, I doubt that it does any meaningful filtering below 1MHz (if that). And surly no EMI filtering at all.

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10 hours ago, Speedskater said:

With a tiny little filter like that, I doubt that it does any meaningful filtering below 1MHz (if that). And surly no EMI filtering at all.

 

 Agreed. It's a very elementary filter.

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The schematic on the filter is typical of any standard EMC filter consisting of cap front end , differential chokes and a series output cap centre connected to earth. 

It would have to be Class B for domestic as a minimum.

100khz reduction is quoted at 8db, 500khz by 14db and at 10Mhz > 30db these figures aren’t too bad at all. There is a spec for this device, you are far too dismissive @Speedskater And @sandyk.

 

http://www.furutech.com/2015/08/18/11637/

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29 minutes ago, One and a half said:

The schematic on the filter is typical of any standard EMC filter consisting of cap front end , differential chokes and a series output cap centre connected to earth. 

It would have to be Class B for domestic as a minimum.

100khz reduction is quoted at 8db, 500khz by 14db and at 10Mhz > 30db these figures aren’t too bad at all. There is a spec for this device, you are far too dismissive @Speedskater And @sandyk.

 

http://www.furutech.com/2015/08/18/11637/

I have previously tried simple filters like this before and if anything they made things worse.

 I use the one in the screen grab which came as a kit (no longer available) with my PC.

Filter.jpg

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Well, according to the official info:

Quote

A parallel circuit with an in-line coil and capacitor that reduces noise at 100KHz by 8dB and at 500KHz by 14 dB and at 10MHz by more than 30dB

Not bad for such a tiny device.

There is a graph:

flux50-1.thumb.png.0cddfd1b7fbdb0116985811abdad6728.png

I am not really interested in a supereffective filter as I use Isotek Aquarius. This one does a great job - it reduces noice at 100KHz by 42/53 Db. But I suppose FI-68 could slightly enhance Aquarius capabilities. Taking into account the fact that the most critical frequencies are 67 KHz - 200 MHz - region where switch mode power supplies operate. While generic SMPSs is one of the main electrical problem, as well as RFI noise (1-100 MHz), FI-68 should be quite effective.

I am using Oyaide C-046 connectors. And I wonder will FI-68 be an upgrade over C-046 or not?

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8 hours ago, sandyk said:

I have previously tried simple filters like this before and if anything they made things worse.

 I use the one in the screen grab which came as a kit (no longer available) with my PC.

Filter.jpg

Right, the way these filters work as I was told is that the frequency is reflected back to the source and doesn’t pass the boundary. So the device making noise will still be doing that , but won’t infect other devices in parallel, we’ll up to the filter’s spec.

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