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Powering Entire System Via Battery Pack

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I recently read this article on enjoythemusic.com by Tom Lyle and it has me incredibly intrigued. In short the article gives a review of the improvements made by powering the authors front end using a GoalZero Lithium Ion Battery pack. 

 

https://headphone.guru/goal-zero-yeti-400-lithium-portable-power-station-review-by-enjoy-the-music-com/

 

https://www.amazon.com/Goal-Zero-Portable-Generator-Alternative/dp/B07CRQX9KW/ref=sr_1_4?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1546723009&sr=1-4&keywords=goal+zero+lithium

 

To be honest I am a lurker here for certain and I must say I envy and thank all the contributors here whose technical knowledge and testing make this site such an amazing resource. What I have learned here is that clean power plays a vital role in the audio path. I have also learned that its so incredibly complicated in practice. So I'm curious what the community thinks of this approach.

 

My system includes an Uptone LPS-1 power supply. This appears to be one of those items that everyone seems to agree on when it comes to sonic improvements. So of course why not power ones whole system with batteries? Cost seems like the obvious answer but perhaps maybe not.

 

I also own a PSaudio P10 power plant. This replaces a home brew balanced power supply and did wonders to lower the noise floor of my mostly tube based system. 

 

Both of these investments have provided improvements to the quality of sound in my system so the subject of clean power has really intrigued me.

 

However looking at the cost per watt of of clean power I cant help be intrigued by the thought of using a large lithium battery back for the whole system. As a comparison the PSaudio Directstream 15 which produces 1500 watts of continuous power and sells for $7500 does this at a cost of $5 a watt. The  PSaudio P10 (not the current version) which has no shortage of accolades can be picked up for around $2500 used. The P10 delivers 1500 watts of pure sine wave power for $1.66 a watt. The GoalZero 1500 Lithium creates the same watts of continuous power for $1.20 a watt, and the GoalZero 3000 can provide 3000 watts for $1 a watt.

 

Now I dont pretend to know if this is an apples to apples comparison of power nor do I want to launch into a debate over the PSaudio approach is a good approach to powering ones system. What intrigues me is whether or not powering a whole system or at least the front end this way is a path to explore. Tom Lyle at Enjoythemusic seems to think so. I remember reading somewhere in a discussion about supercapacitor power provides "cleaner" power compared to lithium. Perhaps something to do with ripple ? I dont know I dont recall. I'm curious what the more educated members here think. I am also curious if this unit remains plugged in while in use does leakage effect sound quality? On the subject of leakage would several smaller units be better than one large unit? GoalZero also claims their output in in the form of a pure sinewave as opposed to what they term a modified sine wave which they claim is better for sensitive electronics. The comparisons to PSaudios approach seem obvious here.  I would really enjoy the communities thoughts on this approach.

 

 

 

 

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Did a little more research and it looks like output impedance is a concern with lithium batteries versus an ultra capacitor. Would this be a limiting factor in trying to apply a whole system litium battery approach? 

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Not something I've played with myself, but a local audio friend, whom I'm visiting today, has spent years exploring powering the front end of rigs just using battery power. And it has always benefited. A key requirement is that the battery mechanism has the 'grunt' to do the job - using such a supply with too high an output impedance will not perform; and the mechanism for recharging needs to be completely out of the picture, normally, to secure best SQ.

 

If the components used for audio playback were better engineered, then these lengths would not be necessary. But everything is made to meet specs, not to sound good - and hence efforts to assist the system will usually be rewarded; like removing mains interference paths in the low level signal areas - through using batteries.

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I would agree that unplugging a unit from the wall would eliminate the potential of noise leakage. The 1400 and 3000 series have a wifi program that allows you to control the unit remotely. Id be curious to know if that includes a physical decoupling from the mains power source.

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Just sharing ... i am trying the above supposed 5v 2amp LT3045 ultra low noise battery PSU

tried one pack to power my Win Server 2016 OS SSD.. it was underwelming ( actually sounded WIMPY .. just on the two 18650 lithium onboard batteries)

But I am going to try it again with a second set in parallel and also with the 8.4v Charger plugged into a separate ac curcuit!! 

Just a cheap experiment 

Now my connecting cables may be too long - high impedance.. hv to try a shorter direct connection

But results already proves my suspicion .. A robust high current capability DC psu is as important as low noise psu

 

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On 1/6/2019 at 12:02 AM, sandston said:

Did a little more research and it looks like output impedance is a concern with lithium batteries versus an ultra capacitor. Would this be a limiting factor in trying to apply a whole system litium battery approach? 

You can use a graphene lipo .... lower impedance then a bunch of ultra capacitors.

 

 

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