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JDRodrigues

Help for a disabled vet

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You guys will pardon my ignorance here, but I bought a squeeze/Duet, connected it to a DAC, hung a USB drive full of files off my PLEX box years ago and basically stopped there in my computer/audio marriage.

I see there are a ton of milestones I have missed and I apologize for my ignorance in advance.
However, as I apologize, I have a request you all may be able to help me with.
I do volunteer work with disabled folks who are unable to navigate the insane regulations/laws/entanglements that come with being disabled in the USA.
Some of my clients become lifelong friends.
This request is for one of those.

He has ALS. By the time I become an expert enough by reading here, it will be too late for him to benefit.
He spends a ton of time in bed now and is unable to use his main system any longer.
Last year, I took a CD changer transport and hooked it to an Emotiva DAC, hacked the remotes so he could use them with a pencil.
He has a 100-CD changer and caretakers that are...shall we say, "less than able to effectively swap out the CD's without damaging them."
(You would not believe some of the situations he has been forced to deal with by refusing the typical nursing home admission.)
Anyway, he has the Emotiva DAC plugged into a Rotel amp that powers a set of old LS35a's and a powered sub.The sound is shockingly good.

He wants more content to listen to.
100 CD's are not enough.

He has a Linux machine he uses daily with a "Quad Joy" joystick.
I copied my own music drive onto a fresh drive and installed it into his Linux machine.
Using the USB into the Emotiva brought about awful results.
Dead, lifeless YUCK! Compared to the CD changer, it was horrible.

Can you lead me in the right direction as to why the fidelity into the USB input is SOOO lifeless?

Is there a quick fix that will work with Linux?
 


The important image in audio is the one you hear.
                                 Forget the others.
 

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If there is another SPDIF input, get a decent usb>SPDIF converter and go in that way. The USB input may be earlier generation limited to 24/96 with an old chip. Regardless, most modern USB inputs still do not sound as good as SPDIF/AES3


 

 

 

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Sounds like untreated PC USB syndrome. 

 

Sounds like finances are limited, so at least a Jitterbug will help. If you can swing another $70 for a SotM SATA filter that is also recommended (assuming the PC is using a SSD).

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either Nordcaps plan, or...

 

a Schiit Eitr might fix things right up - most of their items can be returned for a nominal fee

 

this sounds like noise getting thru on the USB power/gnd lines - the thing to do is to isolate it and that is what the above does


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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5 hours ago, JDRodrigues said:

He has a Linux machine 

Is there a quick fix that will work with Linux?
 

 

That depends on what you refer to as his Linux machine.  If it is an older or lower end laptop my idea is probably shot. 

 

If it is anything else you might just have another SATA plug on the mother board you can temporarily hook a spare hard drive up to and transfer the files over through.  My guess is you would have came to that conclusion were it possible.  

 

Were it possible but his internal hard drive was lacking for space.  And if it was 500GB or smaller.  1TB drives can usually be had for under $50 (cheaper yet used).  Clone his drive onto the new one and go back to step one of adding music from your hard drive.  

 

Maybe this is so simple it was overlooked and maybe I'm the one being simple even suggesting it.

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22 minutes ago, rando said:

 

Maybe this is so simple it was overlooked and maybe I'm the one being simple even suggesting it.


Not at all.
The issue is not the files.
The PC plays the files just fine. VLC works flawlessly.
The problem is when the PC is plugged into the DAC, it sounds like a bowl of cold oatmeal.
Zero dynamics. Zero sparkle. Dead, lifeless.

 


The important image in audio is the one you hear.
                                 Forget the others.
 

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1 minute ago, rando said:

Is this a laptop?

No. It is a Lenovo desktop.
It has two SATA drives now.
One runs his computer...one is a carbon copy of my own music library.


The important image in audio is the one you hear.
                                 Forget the others.
 

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4 hours ago, Nordkapp said:

If there is another SPDIF input, get a decent usb>SPDIF converter and go in that way. The USB input may be earlier generation limited to 24/96 with an old chip. Regardless, most modern USB inputs still do not sound as good as SPDIF/AES3


This sounds like the next thing to try. The PC is dated.
Plenty fast with Linux, but pushing 7 years of age.


The important image in audio is the one you hear.
                                 Forget the others.
 

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