Jump to content
IGNORED

which rate do people buy?


richard kimber
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have a DAC that can do DSD 512.  I also have HQPlayer.

 

Native DSD has a recording of The Rite of Spring that I'd like to buy.  It is offered at:

DXD, 64fs, 128fs, and 256fs.

 

It was digitized at DXD.  Is this one to go for?

 

What buying strategy do people use in these circumstances?

LMS on Odroid XU4; HQPlayer on i7-8700; iFi iGalvanic; T+A DAC 8 DSD; Benchmark AHB2; Quad ESL 2805s + two Acoustic Energy subs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, mansr said:

My general rules:

  • Never buy an upconversion, PCM or DSD
  • Never buy a PCM to DSD conversion
  • Avoid DSD to DSD conversions unless price difference is insane
  • Never pay extra for PCM above 96 kHz
  • Pay no more than 15% extra for 96 kHz over 44/48 kHz

 

Very much the same here.  

 

If there is a recording I simply must have, I will spring for the original (in this case, DXD multichannel) rather than one of the downsampled options . . . but for most recordings, 48k is plenty,  or 96k if that's how it's offered.

John Walker - IT Executive

Headphone - MacMini running Roon Server > Netgear Orbi wireless > Blue Jeans Cable Ethernet > mRendu Roon endpoint > iFi Audio xDSD + iFi Audio xCAN > Focal Elegia

Home Theater - Mac Mini running Roon Server > Blue Jeans Cable HDMI > Pioneer Elite SC-81 > MartinLogan Motion series home theater speakers + M&K subwoofer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, mansr said:

Never pay extra for PCM above 96 kHz

I recently started following this rule for PCM. The truth is that I arrived at this conclusion after I figured out that I can’t tell any difference in SQ between 96Khz and higher sampling rates.   Maybe I don’t have golden ears.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, mansr said:

Avoid DSD to DSD conversions unless price difference is insane

Additionally, if a DSD original is too expensive, prefer a PCM conversion over a lower rate DSD. The latter will have gone through a PCM stage anyway. Buy DSD conversions only if PCM isn't available.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, richard kimber said:

I have a DAC that can do DSD 512.  I also have HQPlayer.

 

Native DSD has a recording of The Rite of Spring that I'd like to buy.  It is offered at:

DXD, 64fs, 128fs, and 256fs.

 

It was digitized at DXD.  Is this one to go for?

 

What buying strategy do people use in these circumstances?

Buy the 16/44. 24/96 or 88 if you must and it's not much more expensive. 

 

I have a subscription to the B & W Society of Sound which give access to one LSO recording and one other per month at 24/96 or 16/44. After years of downloading the 24/96 I don't even bother anymore and go for the 16/44. Ditto for the Suzuki complete bach cantatas. I actually paid for the higher resolution files, in case I ever want the surround mixes but I only bothered to download the 16/44 for now. IMHO the only reason to buy higher rez two channel is if you don't trust the downconversion. But really there's no excuse for anyone botching it when audacity and dbpoweramp perform it as accurately as saracon.  

 

Of the other options DXD, 64fs, 128fs, and 256fs. Well clearly if it's digitised at DXD then the other can't offer anything, so I guess just you could buy that if you don't mind storing 100Khz+ of exquisitely recorded modulator noise. 64fs offers no advantage over 16/44. 

You are not a sound quality measurement device

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, adamdea said:

I have a subscription to the B & W Society of Sound which give access to one LSO recording and one other per month at 24/96 or 16/44. After years of downloading the 24/96 I don't even bother anymore and go for the 16/44.

Since there is no price difference here, I pick the high-res version, just in case. Disk space isn't a problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, mansr said:

Since there is no price difference here, I pick the high-res version, just in case. Disk space isn't a problem.

I know. Makes sense. I just got a bit impatient with the downloads, my nas is filling up and quite a few of the recordings are ones I wouldn't rush out to buy. So I started to think, why bother? 

You are not a sound quality measurement device

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Always buy the original master sample rate. For most that's 96 kHz. For native DSD recordings (Channel Classics, Merging, etc) always buy the master DSD rate. If an MQA version of a PCM album is available, and you are confident in its heritage (review the album notes, release date, studio, etc) AND you have a native MQA DAC, get the MQA version. 

 

Analog source albums are best on reputable mastering studios and vinyl pressings (MoFi, Analouge Productions, etc), and second best on DSD / SACD if your DAC can do native DSD decoding.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, richard kimber said:

What buying strategy do people use in these circumstances?

As rule, sample rate is player/operation system driver/DAC matter. There are not general recommendation by sample rate value.

I'd recommend check different sample rates for your audio system.

Read details here https://samplerateconverter.com/content/how-improve-sound-quality

AuI ConverteR 48x44 - HD audio converter/optimizer for DAC of high resolution files

ISO, DSF, DFF (1-bit/D64/128/256/512/1024), wav, flac, aiff, alac,  safe CD ripper to PCM/DSF,

Seamless Album Conversion, AIFF, WAV, FLAC, DSF metadata editor, Mac & Windows
Offline conversion save energy and nature

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/1/2018 at 12:06 PM, audiventory said:

As rule, sample rate is player/operation system driver/DAC matter. There are not general recommendation by sample rate value.

I'd recommend check different sample rates for your audio system.

The issue is what format/resolution to buy and, since system hardware can change, it would be a mistake to base a purchase on this moving target.  Buying the original recording format/resolution obtains the closest to the "original" (mastering aside) and still allows the user to play it as-is or resample to suit him to suit his hardware, even as it changes.

Kal Rubinson

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Kal Rubinson said:

Buying based on the original recording format/resolution obtains the closest to the "original" (mastering aside) and still allows the user to play it as-is or resample to suit him to suit his hardware, even as it changes.

 

Kal: I fully agree with this approach, but it also raises two questions, if you buy something other than the "original" then presumably the seller has used some up or down conversion software to arrive at the other choices.  1. Are sellers using Audiventory or is there some other preferred solution for vendors? 2. Are those solutions better than using HQ Player on the fly, particularly when HQ Player allows us to make output/filter choices that work best with our individual hardware?

Synology NAS>i7-6700/32GB/NVIDIA QUADRO P4000 Win10>Qobuz+Tidal>Roon>HQPlayer>DSD512> Fiber Switch>Ultrarendu (NAA)>SMSL M500 DAC> Bryston SP3 pre>Levinson No. 432 amps>Magnepan (MG20.1x2, CCR and MMC2x6)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, sdolezalek said:

1. Are sellers using Audiventory or is there some other preferred solution for vendors?

Who knows but, imho, what do you do when you change your DAC?  Buy it again?

 

5 hours ago, sdolezalek said:

2. Are those solutions better than using HQ Player on the fly, particularly when HQ Player allows us to make output/filter choices that work best with our individual hardware?

I do not know.  As I suggested, I get downloads, if possible, in the same resolution as was recorded.  Typically, I resample to 24/192 PCM in order to use REQ.  When I choose not to use REQ, I rarely resample.

Kal Rubinson

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...