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The eardrums move when the eyes move: A multisensory effect on the mechanics of hearing


mansr
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http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/01/22/1717948115

 

"The peripheral hearing system contains several motor mechanisms that allow the brain to modify the auditory transduction process. Movements or tensioning of either the middle ear muscles or the outer hair cells modifies eardrum motion, producing sounds that can be detected by a microphone placed in the ear canal (e.g., as otoacoustic emissions). Here, we report a form of eardrum motion produced by the brain via these systems: oscillations synchronized with and covarying with the direction and amplitude of saccades. These observations suggest that a vision-related process modulates the first stage of hearing. In particular, these eye movement-related eardrum oscillations may help the brain connect sights and sounds despite changes in the spatial relationship between the eyes and the ears."

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35 minutes ago, mansr said:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/01/22/1717948115

 

"The peripheral hearing system contains several motor mechanisms that allow the brain to modify the auditory transduction process. Movements or tensioning of either the middle ear muscles or the outer hair cells modifies eardrum motion, producing sounds that can be detected by a microphone placed in the ear canal (e.g., as otoacoustic emissions). Here, we report a form of eardrum motion produced by the brain via these systems: oscillations synchronized with and covarying with the direction and amplitude of saccades. These observations suggest that a vision-related process modulates the first stage of hearing. In particular, these eye movement-related eardrum oscillations may help the brain connect sights and sounds despite changes in the spatial relationship between the eyes and the ears."

 

You on holiday this week Mans?

 

Reminds me of the flautist James Galway - he had Nystagmus...!

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I've noticed this for years I think.  If I sweep my eyes left to right or up and down, I hear a change. I've thought I was hearing eye muscles via bone conduction. But no other facial muscles do this.  So perhaps it's this effect.

And always keep in mind: Cognitive biases, like seeing optical illusions are a sign of a normally functioning brain. We all have them, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, but it is something that affects our objective evaluation of reality. 

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5 hours ago, Andyman said:

 

You on holiday this week Mans?

 

Reminds me of the flautist James Galway - he had Nystagmus...!

 

Hi 

I do have Congenital nystagmus probably since birth

So does it affect my hearing as well mainly with imaging in the sound stage?

 

i always get bad pain in the eyes and all around head when I sit to listen music looking straight ahead due to which either I prefer tilting my head down looking at the floor

The pain is more like the whole eye being sore like ones hands do get after doing lot of writing 

But the frustrations start as I can't get relieved of the soreness like one can get by stretching ones hand after writing for a long time 

 

 

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4 hours ago, mcgillroy said:

Can’t wait until Bob gets wind of this. It will finally be revealed that that blue light indicates proper alignment with the mastering engineers gaze. Neuroscience you know!

 

I would say if the blue light project out a beautiful and hot girl will help the sales of MQA DAC.:D

MetalNuts

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1 hour ago, Ralf11 said:

there's a deconvolution joke in there somewhere...

 

Yes :)

Got it wrong and thought there is some serious discussion about nystagmus, hence posted about my issue 

 

But that's fine , all is ok 

 

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26 minutes ago, mansr said:

The original post was not intended as a joke.

 

I remember reading a post on Head-Fi where the person was describing that his system sounded different to him if he forgot to wear his glasses. If his vision was clear then things sounded better. At first I thought that he had fallen prey to audiophool obsessing but over time I have realized that my system sounded better to me if I take my reading glasses off since they tend to blur my vision when looking out towards my system. I have played with this phenomena many times and for me it is real.

 

Your article reference helps to explain this.

 

Thanks!


"Don't Believe Everything You Think"

System

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14 hours ago, mansr said:

The original post was not intended as a joke.

 

No! It’s not. @Ralf11 was perhaps thinking about Weiner Kernels ... in any case the neurological system is so incredibly non- linear that completely counter intuitive sensory perception mechanisms exist. Like this. Traditional concepts of eg ultrasonic heating might not apply because — who knows — the retina might respond to 69 kHz ??‍♂️

Custom room treatments for headphone users.

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2 hours ago, Ralf11 said:

best Vikings are in France and make great cream sauces (but little wine)

If you are talking about Rolo, I don't know about the wine made, but he drinks plenty.  

And always keep in mind: Cognitive biases, like seeing optical illusions are a sign of a normally functioning brain. We all have them, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, but it is something that affects our objective evaluation of reality. 

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On 1/24/2018 at 3:54 PM, mansr said:

compiling.png

 

That's how I regularly end up here. Or you could also add "test running!" as an excuse... :D

 

Related to topic, long time ago I participated in one HRTF research and it was freaking hard to keep head and eyes staring forward and not look around when your hearing really really convincingly tells about some objects nearby around your head... :D

 

 

Signalyst - Developer of HQPlayer

Pulse & Fidelity - Software Defined Amplifiers

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