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Separating components for air space


bobfa
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I have a temporary rack in my cabinet that I have setup to take all the gear in and out so I can change and test.  Right now I have my Mytek DAC+ sitting on top of my JS-2.

 

For spacing as the DAC+ gets rather warm I use hockey pucks.  This is not for sound it is for air movement. Note that the DAC+ has a lot of air venting top and bottom so I assume it needs the air flow.

 

 

 63FC6375-7DF6-4464-8F87-BE780453D103.thumb.jpeg.03cd9fffcc4e3577ff473aa03ad62c4f.jpeg

 

The hockey pucks are too big in diameter and slide around.  I am looking to add something between these two devices and maybe some others.  There will be a MacMini in the rack this weekend and so forth.  

 

In the long run the equipment will be put in some sort of audio racking system and I will want some better vibration reduction and some “cool” factor.  

 

Any suggestions?  This gear is physically small and a lot of the stuff I have seen is too big.

 

—RJF

 

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Mapleshade Isoblocks are more effective, give more clearance...but also more expensive.

 

 

isoblocks_1_med.jpg

Note: Each one has two sandwiches stuck together -- there's four individual blocks in this picture. I use these for my own speakers:

 

IMG_0407.thumb.JPG.73980d2cd72979725581ba9418c07df2.JPG

 

IMG_0408.thumb.JPG.fc8eb01c58c5a4d8e12ea2aadc19be0c.JPG

 

 

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1 hour ago, mourip said:

 

I use these also. Tons on eBay.

 

Actually I take it back. Mine use cork like the ones from Mapleshade. They are principally used for industrial equipment vibration isolation but work well for us.

 

You could stack and glue them to get the same as Mapleshade. Search for "cork isolation footer". They are very cheap on eBay. You can get 12 for $11.

 

I often use them along with some Mapleshade brass weights put on top of my DAC or preamp. I have real hockey pucks also but they are quite hard so I do not believe they are as good for absorbing vibration.


"Don't Believe Everything You Think"

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The main suggestion I'd make is to avoid anything fully rubber.  We used to use rubber feet in the early years of Ayre and to this day get units back that have flattened over the years of continued heat and weight.  I'm not sure what the hockey pucks would do over time, but you may have dinner plates in 5 or 6 years!

President

Ayre Acoustics, Inc.

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7 hours ago, Ryan Berry said:

The main suggestion I'd make is to avoid anything fully rubber.  We used to use rubber feet in the early years of Ayre and to this day get units back that have flattened over the years of continued heat and weight.  I'm not sure what the hockey pucks would do over time, but you may have dinner plates in 5 or 6 years!

Welcome Ryan. Nice to hear from someone with industry experience.

 

I have used the rubber a cork feet for several years and they hold up well.


"Don't Believe Everything You Think"

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On 1/10/2018 at 11:34 PM, Speedskater said:

The vibration properties of those rectangle blocks only when the weight on each block is in the block's design range.

 

Most vibration devices that are sold usually give at least a maximum weight limit. Some are sold in multiple sizes to account for that.


"Don't Believe Everything You Think"

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15 hours ago, Milt99 said:

Yup. Mostly used underneath house furnaces.

But remember, MapleShade sprinkles their maple syrup majik goo and then cryos them to get the molecules in harmonic synch and that ain't cheap!

 

It is the "maple syrup majik goo and then cryos them to get the molecules in harmonic synch" that is the value added component that allows them to charge $24 insted of $8 for basically 8 glued up furnace footers. 

 

Actually these are the least suspect devices that they sell and they do seem to work. IMO.

 


"Don't Believe Everything You Think"

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8 hours ago, Ryan Berry said:

The main suggestion I'd make is to avoid anything fully rubber.  We used to use rubber feet in the early years of Ayre and to this day get units back that have flattened over the years of continued heat and weight.  I'm not sure what the hockey pucks would do over time, but you may have dinner plates in 5 or 6 years!

What about TPE?

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On 1/10/2018 at 8:34 PM, GUTB said:

Mapleshade Isoblocks are more effective, give more clearance...but also more expensive.

 

 

isoblocks_1_med.jpg

Note: Each one has two sandwiches stuck together -- there's four individual blocks in this picture. I use these for my own speakers:

 

IMG_0407.thumb.JPG.73980d2cd72979725581ba9418c07df2.JPG

 

IMG_0408.thumb.JPG.fc8eb01c58c5a4d8e12ea2aadc19be0c.JPG

 

 

 

Low bass reproduction can physically vibrate/move a speaker, compromising the clarity of the bass and midrange. Your speakers should have as little freedom to move as possible. Isoblocks are basically filters for low bass frequency feedback coming from the surface an object rests on... useful for electronics and players but not for speakers.... they actually increase the instability of the speaker. Your stand should be rigid, tightly coupled to the floor and allow the speaker to freely radiate sound in all directions.

Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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19 hours ago, wwaldmanfan said:

 

Gotta hand it to Mapleshade getting folks to fork over $40 a set for these, when you can make them yourself for $2.32 and a few drops of glue. Tell me they are not the identical product.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/DiversiTech-MP-2C-Rubber-Cork-Anti-Vibration-Pad-2-x-2-x-7-8

5a57b88136e9b_Screenshot-2018-1-11MP-2C-DiversiTechMP-2C-RubberCorkAnti-VibrationPad2x2x78.thumb.png.b9f43dbd9b89852f6851c4e5dac0575d.png

Dang, wished I'd seen this before I bought 3 sets of Isoblocks. A little rubber glue and I could  have made my own for 25% of what I paid. :)

Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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Mapleshade claims they invented these things and warns against knock-offs.

 

Maplesahde as a company is reputable. Their brass footers do work -- eliminated footfall noise from my turntable (although the spring feet it comes with are more effective overall in terms of sonics) and helped a 845 SET a lot. They claim that their air-dried maple shelves work better that kiln-dried butcher blocks -- I don't know because I could never bring myself to spend $200+ on a block of maple when you can buy large heavy maple butcher blocks for less than $100.

 

Maple audio stands are quite attractive though. Mapleshade and Timbernation put out very nice-looking furniture.  They just want too much for it though.

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7 hours ago, mansr said:

What about TPE?

We tend to avoid anything that compresses much, but maybe Dryflex CS could work if you liked the material.  Our favorites are the wood blocks (of course) and Delrin, which is fairly hard and doesn't compress.  Delrin's particularly nice as it mills real easy and can be used as a permanent foot without worrying about the material drying out and cracking or deforming.

President

Ayre Acoustics, Inc.

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7 minutes ago, Ryan Berry said:

We tend to avoid anything that compresses much, but maybe Dryflex CS could work if you liked the material.  Our favorites are the wood blocks (of course) and Delrin, which is fairly hard and doesn't compress.  Delrin's particularly nice as it mills real easy and can be used as a permanent foot without worrying about the material drying out and cracking or deforming.

Hmm, since you mentioned rubber, I figured some rubbery properties were desired, but Delrin has none.

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On 1/10/2018 at 4:53 PM, bobfa said:

I have a temporary rack in my cabinet that I have setup to take all the gear in and out so I can change and test.  Right now I have my Mytek DAC+ sitting on top of my JS-2.

 

For spacing as the DAC+ gets rather warm I use hockey pucks.  This is not for sound it is for air movement. Note that the DAC+ has a lot of air venting top and bottom so I assume it needs the air flow.

 

 

 63FC6375-7DF6-4464-8F87-BE780453D103.thumb.jpeg.03cd9fffcc4e3577ff473aa03ad62c4f.jpeg

 

The hockey pucks are too big in diameter and slide around.  I am looking to add something between these two devices and maybe some others.  There will be a MacMini in the rack this weekend and so forth.  

 

In the long run the equipment will be put in some sort of audio racking system and I will want some better vibration reduction and some “cool” factor.  

 

Any suggestions?  This gear is physically small and a lot of the stuff I have seen is too big.

 

—RJF

 

BTW, this is very affordable and reasonably rigid/ well made for an inexpensive 4 shelf audio rack. Hopefully the number of shelves and shelf dimensions meet your needs

http://www.audioadvisor.com/prodinfo.asp?number=PGVULRK

 

 

 

Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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