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Needledrops with PS Audio NuWave Phono Converter


PaulF
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I need to do some more vinyl archiving.  In the past I've used a Korg DSD recorder, transferring from its internal hard drive.

 

I want to pick up a PS Audio Nuwave and, hopefully, use its USB output (at 24/192 PCM) right into a Macbook for archiving.  Can someone recommend some software for doing this?

 

(Even better would be to connect the Nuwave right to a USB hard drive but I'm assuming that is not possible!)

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1 minute ago, PaulF said:

I need to do some more vinyl archiving.  In the past I've used a Korg DSD recorder, transferring from its internal hard drive.

 

I want to pick up a PS Audio Nuwave and, hopefully, use its USB output (at 24/192 PCM) right into a Macbook for archiving.  Can someone recommend some software for doing this?

 

(Even better would be to connect the Nuwave right to a USB hard drive but I'm assuming that is not possible!)

 

Start with Audacity.

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I tried out Vinyl Studio and was impressed with the results and ease of use.

As I recall you can record 5 or so albums as a full feature demo, but it's not expensive anyway.

 

Can't remember if it runs on a Mac or Windows only.

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http://www.channld.com/purevinyl/

 

Pure vinyl is quite good for this as well.  I haven't used Vinyl Studio.  Some who have used both say Vinyl Studio is easier to use. 

 

If I were doing only a few Audacity is also up to the task.  If doing more than a few one of these other bits of software made for that task are easier. 

And always keep in mind: Cognitive biases, like seeing optical illusions are a sign of a normally functioning brain. We all have them, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, but it is something that affects our objective evaluation of reality. 

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8 minutes ago, dtc said:

Vinyl Studio. Very easy to use and a steal at $29. Runs on Mac and Windows. Much easier to use than Audacity and geared specifically to digitizing vinyl.

 

I took your word (and the other guy's) for it and just bought it.

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Takes a little bit to learn but it does a great job. There is a Tutorial which explains the use step by step. Any questions, ask here or on their website. I have done hundreds of albums with it.

 

Good luck.

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I did my first recording this eve.  Results were excellent.

 

That said, it occurred to me that, just as with using a computer as music server, the quality of the machine taking the bits might be important.  I shut down everything on my Mac laptop except VS, but this isn't an "audio-optimized" machine.  Is it worthwhile to do that?

 

(Note: The answer I'm looking for is "no.")

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Glad it is working.

 

The main clocking is happening in the ADC not in the PC, so issues with jitter should not be a factor.

 

There is always the chance that additional load on the computer can effect VS. However, I think the effect will be minimal unless there is a significant stress on the system. Personally, I would not be running much else when digitizing, but I also would not go to extremes to eliminate background processes. You might turn off your anti-virus when digitizing as long as you are not accessing the network.  I use an ADC that records to its own disk just for this reason, although I doubt you will be able to hear the difference.

 

You can do some experimenting, but I doubt you will see any effect.

 

I find that judicious use of hiss removal can be very beneficial especially on soft passages. I find it changes the sound, but for the better. And with VS you can always go back and turn it off and save new files without it. VS changes are non-destructive. I use headphones for my cleanup and you can often really hear the hiss. 

 

Same approach with click removal.  My philosophy has always been that once there is a click, the music is already damaged. Cleaning it up will help eliminate the damage that has already been done. Purist who do not want to effect the sound sometimes forget that it has already been changed.  If most of the albums has no clicks, then VS lets you just do click removal on a particular section.  The Patch options are useful for hard to repair damage, although they definitely can change the sound. You need to experiment with them.

 

Hopefully you have found the Green vertical bar to remove lead in and between track sections. It is a little hard to find but it is a very easy tool to eliminate lead in and between track noise.

 

I would experiment with all these options early on, so you don't have to go back and fix up your first albums again, once you have more experience.

 

The discogs lookups are very useful. I posted some tips on the VS forum for finding hard to find albums.

 

Good luck! It is worth it.

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