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A novel way to massively improve the SQ of computer audio streaming

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1 hour ago, One and a half said:

In defense of the Molex plug, they rarely fail, but have had the pins pushed back in the holder a few times not making a connection. Once they stick, the immunity to dirt is quite good. Made in the millions though, quality does suffer, and I bet pirated connectors give the real Molex a bad name. 

Ebay always has something to sell, here's the Molex gold plated variety, the crimping tool though usually costs a bomb, USD500 upwards. 

I have had the same problem as you, which resulted in intermittent contact . I have even used a blob of Araldite to prevent some pins from being pushed back.

 These look as though they should be solderable though.

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5 hours ago, seeteeyou said:

That's great, Furutech FA-220 should be Ø9mm and that's still good for those Oyaide DC plugs, now we just need to find out if those plugs were the "original" ones with larger entry or the "revised" ones

 

https://www.audiophonics.fr/en/balanced-cables/furutech-fa-220-modulation-cable-pc-occ-symmetrical-o9mm-p-5476.html

 

For 5N pure silver cables, Oyaide FTVS-910 (Ø8.5mm) could very well be yet another candidate @ $120 a meter, just beware of fake products if we weren't getting those wires from their official online store

 

http://www.oyaide.com/ENGLISH/AUDIO/products_category/interconnects_cable/pg758.html

https://oyaide.com/catalog/products/p-3628.html

KC17Z7j.jpg fHawbPC.jpg

NLlGid0.jpg mbGEjEE.jpg

 

What if the entry of Oyaide DC plugs weren't large enough? We still have one more option that's even better

 

http://www.atl-newcablestudio.com/DC5521RH.html

http://www.atl-newcablestudio.com/DC5525RH.html

 

Thanks for the links, these are also very interesting plugs. I was lucky to get hold of the original Oyaide DC plugs that are larger than the new ones.

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Interesting information on DC cables from VH Audio.  The new V-Quad Cu21 (OCC copper) will outperform the Pulsar Ag (OCC silver) over the voltage and amperage range of the LPS-1.2.

 

I’ll actually be introducing a new cable soon that is 4 X 21 AWG (18 AWG aggregate for each pole), but it’s UniCrystal copper. It will be called the V-Quad Cu21, and has identical specs to the V-Quad Cu24, but uses 4 x 21 AWG conductors, instead of 4 X 24 AWG.

 

If you want the Pulsar AG, then you’ll have 2% loss for the 12V run, and about 4% loss for the 5V run.

 

If you went with the 18 AWG version (UniCrystal OCC copper) of the V-Quad Cu 21, then you’d have <1% loss for both.

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That was my post on Audiogon post regarding DIY thick .999 dead soft silver DC cables on SR7.  Since then I have made some 10awg pure silver AC power cords as well, and am surprised how much better they sound on the SR7 than the several Synergistics and Furutech PCs I have on hand.  I would have guessed that the superb Hynes SR7 would benefit little from a fancy PC, but this is not the case.  

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2 hours ago, dgarretson said:

That was my post on Audiogon post regarding DIY thick .999 dead soft silver DC cables on SR7.  Since then I have made some 10awg pure silver AC power cords as well, and am surprised how much better they sound on the SR7 than the several Synergistics and Furutech PCs I have on hand.  I would have guessed that the superb Hynes SR7 would benefit little from a fancy PC, but this is not the case.  

 

I've just found your and rrwolfgram14's posts and thank you very much for chiming in, your ideas sound terrific and the price is right

 

http://www.tempoelectric.com/cables.htm

http://www.laventure.net/tourist/cables.htm

https://forum.audiogon.com/discussions/what-speaker-cable-made-a-major-difference-in-the-sound-quality-of-you?page=2

Quote

rrwolfgram,

 

My silver wires also blew away every brand name I have ever had. Thanks very much for this link.

 

Quote

I put together some .999 silver loudspeaker cables a few months ago using info from the website @rrwolfgram mentioned and couldn't be happier with the results. Total cost for an 8' pair was just shy of $200. 

 

And then similar ones (.9999 silver) without any kinda jacket would cost about the same here

 

http://ccsilver.com/silver/superfines.html

 

Heck, even 24K gold @ 24AWG would only cost $95 per foot so it wouldn't be too bad to give that a shot when we only need very short DC cables for LPS-1.2 anyways. Could that potentially be a game changer or more like a disaster? LOL

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4 hours ago, dgarretson said:

That was my post on Audiogon post regarding DIY thick .999 dead soft silver DC cables on SR7.  Since then I have made some 10awg pure silver AC power cords as well, and am surprised how much better they sound on the SR7 than the several Synergistics and Furutech PCs I have on hand. 

 I think that the key word here is "thick" Thick implies a larger conducting area and hence lower resistance. Neither can silver do anything special for a frequency as low as the mains frequency of 50 or 60HZ. If there is an improvement it should only be due to the slightly lower resistance of the cable.

 

http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/formulae/resistance/resistivity-table.php

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Incidentally, when DIYing copper cables for AC, DC or speakers , when using stranded copper cable it is a good idea to make sure that the copper strands at each end are nice and shiny without oxidisation, and then solder the ends together at both ends of the cable using a suitably rated soldering iron .  If you have any silver content solder , then you could use that too.

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36 minutes ago, sandyk said:

 

Incidentally, when DIYing copper cables for AC, DC or speakers , when using stranded copper cable it is a good idea to make sure that the copper strands at each end are nice and shiny without oxidisation, and then solder the ends together at both ends of the cable using a suitably rated soldering iron .  If you have any silver content solder , then you could use that too.

 

I wonder why soldering the strands together is not permitted for connections in mains power distribution networks?

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16 minutes ago, Don Hills said:

 

I wonder why soldering the strands together is not permitted for connections in mains power distribution networks?

 

 Pray tell ?

 All I know is that if you check older jumbo type stranded speaker cables with transparent sheaths, that you are likely to see some corrosion of the copper strands, and if you check the copper strands at the banana plugs they can also show obvious signs of oxidisation, which isn't exactly amenable to the lowest possible resistance.

I recently checked mine, and scraped the ends of the strands clean again before reterminating them in the banana plugs.

 Unfortunately my current soldering iron wasn't up to the task of soldering such a heavy duty cable.

I am not suggesting that you flood the whole area with solder just the very ends if possible .

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22 minutes ago, sandyk said:

 

 Pray tell ?

 ...

 

Solder cold flows over time, loosening the connections. Don't use it for any terminations relying on pressure, such as crimps or screw terminals. That's why it's banned in mains terminations. A properly tightened connection will be gas tight at the points where the metals actually touch, so it doesn't matter if oxidation occurs elsewhere.

 

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1 hour ago, Don Hills said:

 

Solder cold flows over time, loosening the connections. Don't use it for any terminations relying on pressure, such as crimps or screw terminals. That's why it's banned in mains terminations. A properly tightened connection will be gas tight at the points where the metals actually touch, so it doesn't matter if oxidation occurs elsewhere.

 

Don

 I still find it to be an advantage as I described, but I would never do this with actual mains supply cables . :o

Especially as Aussies aren't supposed to fiddle with mains supply wiring, but the N.Z. Government doesn't seem to mind if a few ill informed Kiwis electrocute themselves ! :P

Lightly soldering the wires to a mains plug can actually be an advantage as it stiffens the wire and makes it easier to get the wire nicely under the screw terminal. I also do this at the ends of cable going into screw terminals in my preamp etc. as it ensures that there are no thin stray strands of wire to cause a s/c to another point or chassis, especially after a reinsertion. ( I learned this lesson the hard way! :$ )

In fact, I actually slightly retightened all the terminal block screws in my preamp about half an hour ago after several years of use , as well as ensuring it's + and - supply rails were still fairly close together. I adjusted the trimpots for both lots of the -VE  supplies as they were both around 25mV lower than the +VE rails, not that it would make much difference though.

 I prefer the lesser of 2 evils, which is ensuring that no stray thin copper strands can cause a future problem !

I don't mind slightly retightening screw terminals in my DIY gear every few years, as it also gives me a chance to check that the supply electros haven't become dome shaped (like many Suntan brand electros from Jaycar did), or had developed electrolyte leakage.

Alex

 

P.S.

 In the case of the speaker leads that I mentioned previously, only the very ends would be soldered, but with the type of banana plugs used, the very ends are clear of the banana plug hole with the internal screw going into bare copper only.

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I learned the no solder rule in my NZ Telecom (then NZ Post Office) training some 50 years ago, then again in my Registered Electrician training.  I saw the problem often when I did hardware servicing at IBM. Many systems had power supplies where huge screw-terminal electrolytic capacitors were screwed to massive printed circuit boards. The tracks were tinned to improve current handling, and over time the tinning would cold flow, loosening the screws and causing intermittent problems.

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1 hour ago, Don Hills said:

I learned the no solder rule in my NZ Telecom (then NZ Post Office) training some 50 years ago, then again in my Registered Electrician training.  I saw the problem often when I did hardware servicing at IBM. Many systems had power supplies where huge screw-terminal electrolytic capacitors were screwed to massive printed circuit boards. The tracks were tinned to improve current handling, and over time the tinning would cold flow, loosening the screws and causing intermittent problems.

We didn't have a "no solder" rule in the Postmaster General's Department ( later called Telstra)

Most of our practices were taken from the British Post Office guidelines.

Perhaps many of those problems in N.Z. were more due to the shaky nature of the place ? :P

 

More of a problem for us in Telstra Exchange equipment was due to the growth of very fine metallic whiskers in relay springsets to the frame of the springset .(Earth) This necessitated the replacement of the springset. In the latter years I realised that although the whiskers were too fine to be seen with the naked eye, that an electrolytic capacitor charged to our 52V supply could  vaporise the whiskers and save a fairly expensive exercise.

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42 minutes ago, austinpop said:

PSU Roundup: comparing the new LPS-1.2 with the LPS-1 and SR-4

 

I received my pair of new LPS-1.2s late last week, and have been burning them in ever since. They're now at about 100 hours, so I felt an initial review was in order, especially as I will be traveling for the next week or so. I'm going to revisit this again at about 200 hours, by when I hope to receive the loaner silver cable that @mozes is so graciously sending me.

 

My current chain with PSUs is:

  • sCLK-EX modded switch (LPS-1) > Zenith SE > tX-USBultra (SR-4) > Codex DAC
  • Energizing SMPSes are ground shunted
  • Pangea AC-14SE MkII power cables to energizing supply and SR-4
  • DC cables: Ghent DC01, homebrew Furutech FA 220 AWG14 with Oyaide 2.5mm plugs, Paul Hynes silver DC3FSXLR with Switchcraft 2. 1mm plug

Round 1: After 25 hours of LPS-1.2 burn-in

First the easy part. I swapped the LPS-1 powering the switch with the LPS-1.2, both with the Ghent cable, and it was no contest. The LPS-1.2 was better on every score. Bigger image, airier, deeper bass, and more dynamic. If you own and like the LPS-1, sell it immediately and buy an LPS-1.2. :D It's a no-brainer.

 

Over on the tX-USBultra, I compared the LPS-1.2 (with the Furutech cable) with the SR-4 (with silver DC3FSXLR cable). This was a tougher challenge, and the LPS-1.2, while sounding excellent, seemed to have a slight tizziness and glare compared to the SR-4. I decided to let burn-in continue.

 

Round 2: After 100 hours of LPS-1.2 burn-in

For this round, the switch PSU was fixed at LPS-1.2 with Ghent cable, and I focused on the tX-USBultra PSU. Wow - that extra burn-in really helped! At this point, I would say the LPS-1.2 had pulled very close to the SR-4. If the SR-4 is a 100, the LPS-1.2 is a 95, with the LPS-1 being an 80. Let's break down this comparison in terms of the following attributes:

  • Image size and air: essentially a wash. Both were equally good
  • Dynamism: The SR-4 was just a smidge more dynamic
  • Tonality: the SR-4 has slightly deeper bass, and the LPS-1.2, while by no means harsh, has a slightly brighter tonal signature. This may even be an advantage depending on the baseline tonal balance of the system. My own system benefits from the slightly darker, blacker, tone of the SR-4
  • Noise: The SR-4 still has a slightly calmer and more relaxed presentation.

To put this in perspective, the SR-4 with the silver cable set me back close to ~$675, compared to the ~$500 for the LPS-1.2 plus Furutech cable.

 

Summary

In summary, the LPS-1.2 handily outperforms its predecessor, the LPS-1, and comes very, very close to the SQ of the much more expensive Paul Hynes SR-4. Highly recommended!

Thanks for taking the time to to make this comparison and share it with us. Lets see what will happen with another 100hrs and a silver cable ;) 

My feeling is that the LPS-1.2 weakest point is the 1.1 amps max current. A device like the tX-USBultra pushs it to the limit so I would expect less dynamics compared to the SR-4. 

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1 hour ago, austinpop said:

PSU Roundup: comparing the new LPS-1.2 with the LPS-1 and SR-4

 

I received my pair of new LPS-1.2s late last week, and have been burning them in ever since. They're now at about 100 hours, so I felt an initial review was in order, especially as I will be traveling for the next week or so. I'm going to revisit this again at about 200 hours, by when I hope to receive the loaner silver cable that @mozes is so graciously sending me.

 

My current chain with PSUs is:

  • sCLK-EX modded switch (LPS-1) > Zenith SE > tX-USBultra (SR-4) > Codex DAC
  • Energizing SMPSes are ground shunted
  • Pangea AC-14SE MkII power cables to energizing supply and SR-4
  • DC cables: Ghent DC01, homebrew Furutech FA 220 AWG14 with Oyaide 2.5mm plugs, Paul Hynes silver DC3FSXLR with Switchcraft 2. 1mm plug

Round 1: After 25 hours of LPS-1.2 burn-in

First the easy part. I swapped the LPS-1 powering the switch with the LPS-1.2, both with the Ghent cable, and it was no contest. The LPS-1.2 was better on every score. Bigger image, airier, deeper bass, and more dynamic. If you own and like the LPS-1, sell it immediately and buy an LPS-1.2. :D It's a no-brainer.

 

Over on the tX-USBultra, I compared the LPS-1.2 (with the Furutech cable) with the SR-4 (with silver DC3FSXLR cable). This was a tougher challenge, and the LPS-1.2, while sounding excellent, seemed to have a slight tizziness and glare compared to the SR-4. I decided to let burn-in continue.

 

Round 2: After 100 hours of LPS-1.2 burn-in

For this round, the switch PSU was fixed at LPS-1.2 with Ghent cable, and I focused on the tX-USBultra PSU. Wow - that extra burn-in really helped! At this point, I would say the LPS-1.2 had pulled very close to the SR-4. If the SR-4 is a 100, the LPS-1.2 is a 95, with the LPS-1 being an 80. Let's break down this comparison in terms of the following attributes:

  • Image size and air: essentially a wash. Both were equally good
  • Dynamism: The SR-4 was just a smidge more dynamic
  • Tonality: the SR-4 has slightly deeper bass, and the LPS-1.2, while by no means harsh, has a slightly brighter tonal signature. This may even be an advantage depending on the baseline tonal balance of the system. My own system benefits from the slightly darker, blacker, tone of the SR-4
  • Noise: The SR-4 still has a slightly calmer and more relaxed presentation.

To put this in perspective, the SR-4 with the silver cable set me back close to ~$675, compared to the ~$500 for the LPS-1.2 plus Furutech cable.

 

Summary

In summary, the LPS-1.2 handily outperforms its predecessor, the LPS-1, and comes very, very close to the SQ of the much more expensive Paul Hynes SR-4. Highly recommended!

 

Size difference between the two? 

 

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38 minutes ago, Johnseye said:

 

Size difference between the two? 

 

 

The LPS-1.2 is exactly identical in size to the LPS-1. Extracting from the Paul Hynes product sheet and the Uptone website:

 

SR-4:            W = 110mm, H = 50mm, D = 230mm

LPS-1.2:       W = 110mm, H = 30mm, D = 112mm 

 

The SR4 power supply...

is a scaled down version of the SR7 single rail supply with voltage selection switch
covering the range 5v, 7v, 9v 12v with an output current rating of 2A continuous 20A
transient.

 

...the new UltraCap LPS-1.2 offers you 5V, 7V, 9V, and 12 volt output choices. This broadens

the range of devices that can be powered. Maximum guaranteed output current—at all voltages—is still 1.1A.

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4 hours ago, austinpop said:

PSU Roundup: comparing the new LPS-1.2 with the LPS-1 and SR-4

 

I received my pair of new LPS-1.2s late last week, and have been burning them in ever since. They're now at about 100 hours, so I felt an initial review was in order, especially as I will be traveling for the next week or so. I'm going to revisit this again at about 200 hours, by when I hope to receive the loaner silver cable that @mozes is so graciously sending me.

 

My current chain with PSUs is:

  • sCLK-EX modded switch (LPS-1) > Zenith SE > tX-USBultra (SR-4) > Codex DAC
  • Energizing SMPSes are ground shunted
  • Pangea AC-14SE MkII power cables to energizing supply and SR-4
  • DC cables: Ghent DC01, homebrew Furutech FA 220 AWG14 with Oyaide 2.5mm plugs, Paul Hynes silver DC3FSXLR with Switchcraft 2. 1mm plug

Round 1: After 25 hours of LPS-1.2 burn-in

First the easy part. I swapped the LPS-1 powering the switch with the LPS-1.2, both with the Ghent cable, and it was no contest. The LPS-1.2 was better on every score. Bigger image, airier, deeper bass, and more dynamic. If you own and like the LPS-1, sell it immediately and buy an LPS-1.2. :D It's a no-brainer.

 

Over on the tX-USBultra, I compared the LPS-1.2 (with the Furutech cable) with the SR-4 (with silver DC3FSXLR cable). This was a tougher challenge, and the LPS-1.2, while sounding excellent, seemed to have a slight tizziness and glare compared to the SR-4. I decided to let burn-in continue.

 

Round 2: After 100 hours of LPS-1.2 burn-in

For this round, the switch PSU was fixed at LPS-1.2 with Ghent cable, and I focused on the tX-USBultra PSU. Wow - that extra burn-in really helped! At this point, I would say the LPS-1.2 had pulled very close to the SR-4. If the SR-4 is a 100, the LPS-1.2 is a 95, with the LPS-1 being an 80. Let's break down this comparison in terms of the following attributes:

  • Image size and air: essentially a wash. Both were equally good
  • Dynamism: The SR-4 was just a smidge more dynamic
  • Tonality: the SR-4 has slightly deeper bass, and the LPS-1.2, while by no means harsh, has a slightly brighter tonal signature. This may even be an advantage depending on the baseline tonal balance of the system. My own system benefits from the slightly darker, blacker, tone of the SR-4
  • Noise: The SR-4 still has a slightly calmer and more relaxed presentation.

To put this in perspective, the SR-4 with the silver cable set me back close to ~$675, compared to the ~$500 for the LPS-1.2 plus Furutech cable.

 

Summary

In summary, the LPS-1.2 handily outperforms its predecessor, the LPS-1, and comes very, very close to the SQ of the much more expensive Paul Hynes SR-4. Highly recommended!

 

Great write-up Rajiv! ? I just got the delivery notification of my LPS-1.2 and looking forward to try it out in a week or so. I do think you should try the feeder supply without JSGT and see how that turns out? In my setup JSGT is only beneficial when powering network devices and never ever when connected to the safety ground receptacle on the powerstrip (which is probably due to my AC mains dual float approach). I will of course use a Gophert cps-3205II to feed the LPS-1.2 and another two LT3045 at the DC cable end close to the powered devices (Ghent JSSG DC Y-split which in my case will be feeding both Aqvox switch and BluWave GI Spdif output). 

 

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11 hours ago, austinpop said:

The LPS-1.2 was better on every score. Bigger image, airier, deeper bass, and more dynamic. If you own and like the LPS-1, sell it immediately and buy an LPS-1.2. :D It's a no-brainer.

 

On behalf of my wallet - damn you Rajiv!! :P

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7 hours ago, Cornan said:

 

Great write-up Rajiv! ? I just got the delivery notification of my LPS-1.2 and looking forward to try it out in a week or so. I do think you should try the feeder supply without JSGT and see how that turns out? In my setup JSGT is only beneficial when powering network devices and never ever when connected to the safety ground receptacle on the powerstrip (which is probably due to my AC mains dual float approach). I will of course use a Gophert cps-3205II to feed the LPS-1.2 and another two LT3045 at the DC cable end close to the powered devices (Ghent JSSG DC Y-split which in my case will be feeding both Aqvox switch and BluWave GI Spdif output). 

 

 

Hi Micael,

 

i experimented with JSGT on the feeder Meanwell supplies a while back, and found it to have a small benefit - even powering other devices than a switch. As for the LPS-1.2, they have ground shunting built in. 

 

Bottom line - in my system, ground shunting has a very minor effect on SQ.

 

I’ll be interested to see how your experiments go!

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