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Do you experience skin orgasms?


rodrigaj
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No, mine are of different kind. ;)

 

You can also check out 'The Nature of Things Season 56 Episode 8: I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song'. [h=1][/h] [h=1][/h]

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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I like to mix dopamine with oxytocin

 

 

of course this brings up a topic related to the best alcohol thread: what neurotransmitters go best with which speakers?

 

or with tubes...

 

 

and.. Sachs is off trail a bit if he is quoted correctly as to only cold making your hair stand on end - that is also a fright response

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Yeah, I do! Anytime I hear Pavoratti sing "Nessun Dorma" or Kiri Te Kanawa sing "O Mia Babbino Caro". Also am affected similarly when I hear any number of Miklos Rozsa film music, some Joan Baez songs, Ian and Sylvia singing "Molly and Tenbrooks ", Ravel's "Daphnis et Chloe" Rachmaninoff's "Third Piano Concerto" Tchaikovsky's 1st Piano Concerto, etc. :)

George

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Actively listening is essential, but Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue and Beethoven's 6th Symphony always get me. Lots or others as well.

 

What I found interesting is that some listeners are more prone to these sensations than others. It is sort of like crying. My wife's family are all cryers. The least provocation leads to tears. Whereas, my family rarely cries.

 

There was one reviewer (JA?) who for many years claimed the "goose bumps" test was a reliable way of determining whether a component or speaker or recording was great.

 

"The function of music is to release us from the tyranny of conscious thought", Sir Thomas Beecham. 

 

 

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Frissons.. There also exists the term 'flow' which I believe can be experienced while listening to the music. Or while playing it. I play bass guitar from time to time. I'm not a professional player or musician by any means but when the moment of inspiration or groove comes ..wow, that's really a fantastic feeling. :)

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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Actively listening is essential, but Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue and Beethoven's 6th Symphony always get me. Lots or others as well.

 

Definitely agree about the Beethoven Pastoral. I love Rhapsody I​n Blue​ but have never had the reaction we're talking about from it.

What I found interesting is that some listeners are more prone to these sensations than others. It is sort of like crying. My wife's family are all cryers. The least provocation leads to tears. Whereas, my family rarely cries.

 

There was one reviewer (JA?) who for many years claimed the "goose bumps" test was a reliable way of determining whether a component or speaker or recording was great.

 

No, that was Gordon Holt.

George

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Gordon Holt. Yes, that's right. Founder of Stereophile and a big proponent of double blind testing. I loved his articles back in the days.

 

"The function of music is to release us from the tyranny of conscious thought", Sir Thomas Beecham. 

 

 

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Yeah, I do! Anytime I hear Pavoratti sing "Nessun Dorma" or Kiri Te Kanawa sing "O Mia Babbino Caro". Also am affected similarly when I hear any number of Miklos Rozsa film music, some Joan Baez songs, Ian and Sylvia singing "Molly and Tenbrooks ", Ravel's "Daphnis et Chloe" Rachmaninoff's "Third Piano Concerto" Tchaikovsky's 1st Piano Concerto, etc. :)

Does it ever happen to you with unfamiliar music?

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Does it ever happen to you with unfamiliar music?

OH, yes, quite often. One particular time, I was setting at my desk at work, listening to the radio on earphones, and they played a Celtic folk song I had never heard before called "The Queen of Auld Argyle" by a group calling themselves 'Silly Wizard'. I stopped dead in my tracks; felt a shiver go up my spine, and bought 'The Best of Silly Wizard' later that same day.

George

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Does it ever happen to you with unfamiliar music?

I remember it happening to me the first time I heard Hummel's trumpet concerto in the '70's. I was into jazz at the time and was flummoxed by the recording. I had no interest in classical music, but that nonesuch recording became the basis for a shift into classical music. Same thing happened when I heard Shostakovich's 1st piano concerto. That led me into the world of 20th century classical music along with Walton's Symphony 1.

 

"The function of music is to release us from the tyranny of conscious thought", Sir Thomas Beecham. 

 

 

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I remember it happening to me the first time I heard Hummel's trumpet concerto in the '70's. I was into jazz at the time and was flummoxed by the recording. I had no interest in classical music, but that nonesuch recording became the basis for a shift into classical music. Same thing happened when I heard Shostakovich's 1st piano concerto. That led me into the world of 20th century classical music along with Walton's Symphony 1.

 

The realization that one might enjoy classical music, and the ensuing life-long journey into the genre is quite an adventure, isn't it? Everything is so eclectic; realizing the different composer's styles, the ethnicity of the composer, the era of the compositions, all contribute to a myriad of different types of music that can take someone a lifetime to explore. I consider the day, as a teen, that I discovered that I liked classical music to be one of the most important days of my life, setting me on an odyssey that won't end until the day I die. While I cherish those familiar compositions which are like old friends, giving pleasure whenever I hear them, I especially look forward to those goose pimples and that shiver up the spine that one gets when one hears some heretofore unknown work that hits one like a thunderclap! I often feel that those audiophiles who listen only to the pop and rock that they grew-up with are really not in it (only) for the music, but are really trying to relive their youth through nostalgia for the music of their generation. To me they seem stuck in a musical rut. There will never be any more Beatles, any more Elvis songs, any more David Bowie. So they are doomed, more or less, to listen to the same music over and over forever. To each his own.

George

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The realization that one might enjoy classical music, and the ensuing life-long journey into the genre is quite an adventure, isn't it? Everything is so eclectic; realizing the different composer's styles, the ethnicity of the composer, the era of the compositions, all contribute to a myriad of different types of music that can take someone a lifetime to explore. I consider the day, as a teen, that I discovered that I liked classical music to be one of the most important days of my life, setting me on an odyssey that won't end until the day I die. While I cherish those familiar compositions which are like old friends, giving pleasure whenever I hear them, I especially look forward to those goose pimples and that shiver up the spine that one gets when one hears some heretofore unknown work that hits one like a thunderclap! I often feel that those audiophiles who listen only to the pop and rock that they grew-up with are really not in it (only) for the music, but are really trying to relive their youth through nostalgia for the music of their generation. To me they seem stuck in a musical rut. There will never be any more Beatles, any more Elvis songs, any more David Bowie. So they are doomed, more or less, to listen to the same music over and over forever. To each his own.

I agree.

 

What I find most disturbing is how many young kids are not being exposed to the classical genre. I was brought up in the South Bronx and went to inner city schools in the 1960's. Even in this most difficult environment, we were all exposed to classical music. Every kid graduating from high school was exposed to it. I certainly didn't go around talking up Beethoven, but the seed was planted. Now all music programs have been cut. Not just in inner cities, but everywhere.

 

Put into perspective, the highest rated shows on TV were the Leonard Berstein's Omnibus programs, where he explained music. That would never happen today.

 

I have a collection of pop and rock LP's from the 60's and 70's. I never listen to them anymore. I totally agree with you about the rut that of my generation find themselves in. With a subscription to Tidal and a fundamental understanding of classical music, you will never run out of interesting stuff to listen to.

 

"The function of music is to release us from the tyranny of conscious thought", Sir Thomas Beecham. 

 

 

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The realization that one might enjoy classical music, and the ensuing life-long journey into the genre is quite an adventure, isn't it? Everything is so eclectic; realizing the different composer's styles, the ethnicity of the composer, the era of the compositions, all contribute to a myriad of different types of music that can take someone a lifetime to explore. I consider the day, as a teen, that I discovered that I liked classical music to be one of the most important days of my life, setting me on an odyssey that won't end until the day I die. While I cherish those familiar compositions which are like old friends, giving pleasure whenever I hear them, I especially look forward to those goose pimples and that shiver up the spine that one gets when one hears some heretofore unknown work that hits one like a thunderclap! I often feel that those audiophiles who listen only to the pop and rock that they grew-up with are really not in it (only) for the music, but are really trying to relive their youth through nostalgia for the music of their generation. To me they seem stuck in a musical rut. There will never be any more Beatles, any more Elvis songs, any more David Bowie. So they are doomed, more or less, to listen to the same music over and over forever. To each his own.

 

Nor will there ever be any more Beethoven or Mozart.

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Nor will there ever be any more Beethoven or Mozart.

 

You are right, but I think you miss the point. One's generation's music is just that, the music of one generation. With classical and jazz, the music covers not just one generation, but literally hundreds of years (for the classical, many decades for the jazz). And exploring those various eras keeps the journey fresh, exciting and invigorating. If, as a classical music enthusiast ,I listened only to Beethoven and Mozart and perhaps a few others, I would be no different from those that I think are in a musical rut.

 

I know so many guys calling themselves audiophiles who spend a fortune off their expendable income on Hi-Fi gear with which to listen ONLY to the music of their generation. Depending on their age, that could be Elvis, or the Beachboys and Beatles, or perhaps the Stones, or if they're younger, perhaps Crosby Stills and Nash, or perhaps James Taylor and David Bowie and the Who. They don't seem too interested in exploring the eras before or after their own, personal teen years and I have to wonder if their audio aspirations are driven by a genuine love of music, or are they really nostalgists, trying to relive their youth through the music they grew up with. I'm not being condescending here. That's, of course, they're choice and I have no problem with it. My only comment is that too me that would be in a rut. But I too feel nostalgic about some of the music that formed an obligato to my developing years as well, but it's only a very small portion of my listening repertoire.

George

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There was one reviewer (JA?) who for many years claimed the "goose bumps" test was a reliable way of determining whether a component or speaker or recording was great.

 

I disagree.

Listening to music and evaluating performance are completely different tasks.

 

Besides I get goosebumps from listening music reproduced by the rubbish system of a car or even my phone.

It's no more triggered by sound quality than by the state of mind I'm in or by how sensitive I am feeling at that particular moment.

 

Sound quality should be judged for what it is: sound.

 

R

"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira de Pascoaes

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You are right, but I think you miss the point. One's generation's music is just that, the music of one generation. With classical and jazz, the music covers not just one generation, but literally hundreds of years (for the classical, many decades for the jazz). And exploring those various eras keeps the journey fresh, exciting and invigorating. If, as a classical music enthusiast ,I listened only to Beethoven and Mozart and perhaps a few others, I would be no different from those that I think are in a musical rut.

 

I know so many guys calling themselves audiophiles who spend a fortune off their expendable income on Hi-Fi gear with which to listen ONLY to the music of their generation. Depending on their age, that could be Elvis, or the Beachboys and Beatles, or perhaps the Stones, or if they're younger, perhaps Crosby Stills and Nash, or perhaps James Taylor and David Bowie and the Who. They don't seem too interested in exploring the eras before or after their own, personal teen years and I have to wonder if their audio aspirations are driven by a genuine love of music, or are they really nostalgists, trying to relive their youth through the music they grew up with. I'm not being condescending here. That's, of course, they're choice and I have no problem with it. My only comment is that too me that would be in a rut. But I too feel nostalgic about some of the music that formed an obligato to my developing years as well, but it's only a very small portion of my listening repertoire.

This is almost exactly my point of viewing these topics. I am always astonished when I discover a person I'm talking to is stuck in the music of his youth. I remember the consecutive steps of my musical interests development - The Beatles fascination at the age of 7-9, discovering that there exists music that you have to listen to more than one time to understand it and enjoy it at I think 12 (a very important one!), being bored with rock verse-chorus-bridge-solo structure and thus discovering jazz, including free jazz then classical.. I can still enjoy Beatles' song but there's so much more.. I still listen to some of the music that I listened to when I was 15-20, some bands on the other hand are more or less forgotten.

 

Unfortunatly I think most people are in the musical rut of abovementioned kind. For me it was always moving forward and discovering new, unkonown territories. I have no problem with playing some Metallica or Pantera when I'm in the mood for it and playing Coltrane, Miles or Mahler 30 minutes later. The genre I'm least familiar with is definitely classical and I'm actually very happy about it cause I suspect this is not the end of the journey and there are still many sounds and names to be discovered.

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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