Jump to content
IGNORED

Router questions: Why disable Wireless? Why us one port?


Recommended Posts

Hi guys, I am just in the planning stage of setting up my home network. The network will be used primarily for audio purposes. I have been reading the excellent "Network Audio Refresher" article on this site, and have a couple of questions.

 

The system I am building will include either an Aurender N100h, or something like the Lumin U1. So there will be a NAS and Ipad control app involved.

 

The article can be seen here:Computer Audiophile - Network Audio Refresher

 

1. The article recommends disabling the wireless function on the router, and using something like an Apple Airport Extreme connected to a switch as an wireless access point. Could someone explain why this is better than just letting the router do the wireless wi-fi part?

 

2. The article recommends using only one Ethernet LAN port on the routers output to connect to a switch, where all the audio traffic will flow through. Why is this better than using the multiple LAN ports available on most routers, and eliminating the need for a switch?

 

I welcome any comments or advice, thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi guys, I am just in the planning stage of setting up my home network. The network will be used primarily for audio purposes. I have been reading the excellent "Network Audio Refresher" article on this site, and have a couple of questions.

 

The system I am building will include either an Aurender N100h, or something like the Lumin U1. So there will be a NAS and Ipad control app involved.

 

The article can be seen here:Computer Audiophile - Network Audio Refresher

 

1. The article recommends disabling the wireless function on the router, and using something like an Apple Airport Extreme connected to a switch as an wireless access point. Could someone explain why this is better than just letting the router do the wireless wi-fi part?

 

2. The article recommends using only one Ethernet LAN port on the routers output to connect to a switch, where all the audio traffic will flow through. Why is this better than using the multiple LAN ports available on most routers, and eliminating the need for a switch?

 

I welcome any comments or advice, thanks!

 

Wifi is seen as a noise producing system that isn't optimal for audio.

The rest of is is about using a dedicated component for each different part of the network process. Instead of using something like an all in one device that does 4 functions: input of internet from provider, routing, wireless and wireless distribution, the idea is to have a dedicated device for each function that does the particular function better than an all in one device.

 

In my case it did improve performance of my network, although I bought more basic separates (cheaper) than the professional type devices Chris uses.

Main listening (small home office):

Main setup: Surge protector +_iFi  AC iPurifiers >Isol-8 Mini sub Axis Power Conditioning+Isolation>QuietPC Low Noise Server>Roon (Audiolense DRC)>Stack Audio Link II>Kii Control>Kii Three >GIK Room Treatments.

Secondary Listening: Server with Audiolense RC>RPi4 or analog>Matrix Element i Streamer/DAC (XLR)+Schiit Freya>Kii Three .

Bedroom: SBTouch to Cambridge Soundworks Desktop Setup.
Living Room/Kitchen: RPi 3B+ running RoPieee to a pair of Morel Hogtalare. 

All absolute statements about audio are false :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wifi is seen as a noise producing system that isn't optimal for audio. The rest of is is about using a dedicated component for each different part of the network process. Instead of using something like an all in one device that does 4 functions: input of internet from provider, routing, wireless and wireless distribution, the idea is to have a dedicated device for each function that does the particular function better than an all in one device. In my case it did improve performance of my network, although I bought more basic separates (cheaper) than the professional type devices Chris uses.
Thanks firedog, that concept of using separates makes sense, as does keeping the Wifi away.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have just changed from ethernet connection: mac mini to Arris Time Warner ethernet router TO ethernet from the Arris router to an Airport Time Capsule extreme(with the associated WiFi network). I really don't notice any drop off in SQ streaming Qubuz or TIDAL iTunes (HiFi 16/44 flac aiff) thru Audirvana 2+-should I? Theoretically should I have kept or now add the ethernet connection from the Mac Mini back to the Arris router(router has 4 ethernet ports).

I get dropouts from both Qobuz desktop and TIDAL desktop used alone and am having trouble with ROON but not with them via USB or miniToslink from mac to my Schiit Gungnir only when using my sennheiser hdr 195s

which are wireless and used to be black no noise between songs and now have static that disappears with music

Anyone have any thoughts?

I purchased the Time Capsule for the backup 2 TB HD wanting to keep everything Apple and for trying to get Apple TV to work in my family room which it does now with 4/5 signal strength

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one router in the home, an AirPort Extreme (with linear power supply). My server and DAC are plugged into it, as well as my computer. It is also the source of wifi in our home. So would a switch between the router and DAC be of benefit?

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Computer Audiophile

EtherRegen > SonicTransporter i9 > opticalRendu > Ayre QX-5 DAC > Ayre KX-R Twenty Preamp > Ayre MX-R Twenty mono amps > YG Kipod Signature Passive speakers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The article can be seen here:Computer Audiophile - Network Audio Refresher

1. The article recommends disabling the wireless function on the router, and using something like an Apple Airport Extreme connected to a switch as an wireless access point. Could someone explain why this is better than just letting the router do the wireless wi-fi part?

 

2. The article recommends using only one Ethernet LAN port on the routers output to connect to a switch...

Another reason for point 1 is that the article assumes the router provided by the ISP is "master of none", so its WiFi is not (as) good. So its WiFi is disabled and a better 802.11ac WiFi access point is used.

 

Point 2 reminds me of this (FYI only, not a recommendation as I've not used it)

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/f22-networking-networked-audio-and-streaming/new-paul-pang-audio-grade-switch-25052/

http://ppaproduct.blogspot.com/2015/07/audio-grade-switcher.html

Peter Lie

LUMIN Firmware Lead

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...