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Fusion also give us Szechwan food with chili peppers & pizza/pasta with tomato sauce, not to mention modern chocolates...

 

OTOH, I understand the ketchup on Thai curry horror - reminds me of St. Vincent...

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On 5/18/2019 at 3:16 PM, AnotherSpin said:

Bach with great Persian tradition, both are quite excellent and totally perfect by itself.

I agree, both are. Like I said in the original post - I find the idea of mixing them quite interesting. The end result in this case IMO isn't that great and I also agree with you - It didn't go much beyond what you describe as '1+1=2'. The main reason for my posting of this video was the originality of the idea. Maybe some day someone will develop it and the result will be just superb. 

On 5/18/2019 at 3:16 PM, AnotherSpin said:

in any given time I was preferring Kind of Blue over Agharta.

I like both although I also have a very personal 'relation' with 'KoB' don't expect my disregard of 'Agharta', 'Pangaea' or 'Live in Tokyo' - this was extremely adventurous stuff!

On 5/19/2019 at 10:11 AM, semente said:

Though it may make things more palatable to people who are not prepared to embrace the difference, but enjoy a slight exotic twist.

OTOH if Chris Blackwell didn't add some elements of rock to Bob Marley's music (with a strictly commercial intention - to make things easier to digest for the general audience) we might have not get to know the reggae no 1 performer (who not only aroused interest in reggae but in consequence also in African music and in world music in general). IMO in this case the end result was not only commercial but also artistic success. And there are more examples like that.

As for your culinary statements - I totally agree - pineapple on a pizza isn't right and adding anything to a good wine should equal a prison sequence! x-D

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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43 minutes ago, sphinxsix said:

 

I like both although I also have a very personal 'relation' with 'KoB' don't expect my disregard of 'Agharta', 'Pangaea' or 'Live in Tokyo' - this was extremely adventurous stuff!

 

 

In fact, Agharta was my very first vinyl set of Miles Davis, purchased in 70-s, although I was familiar with his earlier recordings before that. It definitely had rather exotic if not freakish feeling in seventies, but after that days I didn't go back his pre-hiatus output. Even less care about post-hiatus. I refer most of the times to his mid-sixties output these days, such albums as Nefertiti, Sorcerer, E.S.P., Miles Smiles, and so on, or late 50-s Prestige albums. River is deep, strong and fast when its banks delineated sharply...)

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5 hours ago, sphinxsix said:

I agree, both are. Like I said in the original post - I find the idea of mixing them quite interesting. The end result in this case IMO isn't that great and I also agree with you - It didn't go much beyond what you describe as '1+1=2'. The main reason for my posting of this video was the originality of the idea. Maybe some day someone will develop it and the result will be just superb. 

I like both although I also have a very personal 'relation' with 'KoB' don't expect my disregard of 'Agharta', 'Pangaea' or 'Live in Tokyo' - this was extremely adventurous stuff!

OTOH if Chris Blackwell didn't add some elements of rock to Bob Marley's music (with a strictly commercial intention - to make things easier to digest for the general audience) we might have not get to know the reggae no 1 performer (who not only aroused interest in reggae but in consequence also in African music and in world music in general). IMO in this case the end result was not only commercial but also artistic success. And there are more examples like that.

As for your culinary statements - I totally agree - pineapple on a pizza isn't right and adding anything to a good wine should equal a prison sequence! x-D

 

I agree.

I got to know the old Cubans thanks to Cooder, and the Hilliard Ensemble thanks to Garbarek.

"Science draws the wave, poetry fills it with water" Teixeira de Pascoaes

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4 hours ago, AnotherSpin said:

 

In fact, Agharta was my very first vinyl set of Miles Davis, purchased in 70-s, although I was familiar with his earlier recordings before that. It definitely had rather exotic if not freakish feeling in seventies, but after that days I didn't go back his pre-hiatus output. Even less care about post-hiatus. I refer most of the times to his mid-sixties output these days, such albums as Nefertiti, Sorcerer, E.S.P., Miles Smiles, and so on, or late 50-s Prestige albums. River is deep, strong and fast when its banks delineated sharply...)

The first Miles album I ever heard was 'Bitches Brew', I was 16 or 17 and wasn't ready for such music, needed a couple more years. His bands from the second half of the 60's are probably a pinnacle of his acoustic period but I listen to his music from every period including the late one every now and then. The guy was a genius, no doubt. And SOAB.

 

1 minute ago, semente said:

 

I agree.

I got to know the old Cubans thanks to Cooder, and the Hilliard Ensemble thanks to Garbarek.

Same here, I also got to know Ali Farka Toure thanks to Cooder.  

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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40 minutes ago, sphinxsix said:

The first Miles album I ever heard was 'Bitches Brew', I was 16 or 17 and wasn't ready for such music, needed a couple more years. His bands from the second half of the 60's are probably a pinnacle of his acoustic period but I listen to his music from every period including the late one every now and then. The guy was a genius, no doubt. And SOAB.

 

 

I was never able to appreciate Bitches Brew in accordance to its stellar status as most famous or, at least, groundbreaking jazz-rock album ever. My top list for electric period includes first 30 minutes from Get Up With It, In A Silent Way, and complete The Cellar Door sessions.

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45 minutes ago, AnotherSpin said:

 

I was never able to appreciate Bitches Brew in accordance to its stellar status as most famous or, at least, groundbreaking jazz-rock album ever. 

The question that I have always asked myself was - how an album like that (it's not an easy music, I think everyone will agree) has become one of the bestselling jazz(..) albums ever. I believe people bought it after reading reviews (you know - fusion of rock a and jazz by great MD who was envious of position of Jimi Hendrix in 'popular' music, etc..) not exactly knowing what music they were buying. Or maybe they were simply on drugs.. ;)

45 minutes ago, AnotherSpin said:

My top list for electric period includes first 30 minutes from Get Up With It, In A Silent Way, and complete The Cellar Door sessions.

For me the pinnacle of electric Miles are the three albums mentioned above (Pangaea etc..). I think his wah-wah trumpet playing and in general music from these Japanese concerts is way underrated. It's not an everyday listen though. I agree, 'In a Silent Way' is an amazing album too! 

BTW have you heard the Japanese SACD remix of 'Kind of Blue'? If so, what's your opinion on its sound?

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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33 minutes ago, sphinxsix said:

BTW have you heard the Japanese SACD remix of 'Kind of Blue'? If so, what's your opinion on its sound?

 

Not sure. I still have a "gold" Japan SBM CD, even I do not have CD-player for years. The rip of this CD sounds very good to me.

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Ps. Here are examples of some of Haiko's music projects (he plays both classical Indian and diverse fusion music) plus his and Lenneke van Staalen's (the solo violinist in the first video) site if someone is interested.

 

 

 

 

 

http://indianmusiccircle.com/Welcome.html

 

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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On 8/9/2019 at 6:11 PM, rando said:
Quote

Imagine 21 tuned drums hanging in a gilded circular frame - playing melodies with astounding gusto and verve.  This instrument - the pat waing - is one of the most incredible and unique percussion instruments in the world.

 

 

An amazing instrument, a very unique sound (and looks).

(just decided to learn to play it in my 70's ;))

 

 

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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Two more performers whose concerts which took place in the Gandhi Center I attended recently.

Sidhartha Siliceo - an ambassador of Indian music in ..Mexico. We had a conversation after the concert concerning among other things the importance of SQ during gigs.

Here in a hypnotic solo fusion performance.

 

 

Troilee Dutta plays sarod with lots of feminine delicacy but she can also be more feisty every now and then. She's really a wonderful person.

Here's her duet with Heiko Dijker on rav drum from the Windmill Sessions concert that I unfortunately couldn't attend.

 

 

Don't windmills and Indian music fit together well.? :)

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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On 9/2/2019 at 1:59 AM, Nikhil said:

 


I like the instrumentation. Reminds me of the band Morphine, which I loved.

One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> wi-fi to router -> EtherREGEN -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen (powered by LPS-1) -> USPCB -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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On 9/28/2019 at 10:56 PM, sphinxsix said:

Sidhartha Siliceo - an ambassador of Indian music in ..Mexico. We had a conversation after the concert concerning among other things the importance of SQ during gigs.

Here in a hypnotic solo fusion performance.

 

That is fantastic!  I was in Goa last year and heard a similar performance i.e. live sitar played over EDM in the background.  Hypnotic is the right word.   

 

 

 

.

Win10 Transport + Fidelizer 8.6 + JRMC 27 & HQPlayer | Job INT | Green Mountain Audio Eos HX

 

 

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On 9/28/2019 at 10:56 PM, sphinxsix said:

Troilee Dutta plays sarod with lots of feminine delicacy but she can also be more feisty every now and then. She's really a wonderful person.

Here's her duet with Heiko Dijker on rav drum from the Windmill Sessions concert that I unfortunately couldn't attend.

 

 

Isn't that also called a HANG (drum).  Amazing instrument.  Magical together with Troilee Dutta's sarod.

 

 

 

.

Win10 Transport + Fidelizer 8.6 + JRMC 27 & HQPlayer | Job INT | Green Mountain Audio Eos HX

 

 

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