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CD Rot.


sandyk
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Bugger !

I just found 3 large pinholes in my West German pressing of Fleetwood Mac-Tusk. 266-088 Europe 3350-2 U.S.A

I would suggest that others who have this pressing check their own copy.

EAC had major problems reading Track 2 so I aborted.

Luckily, I have a copy saved from 2009 which has the same .md5 checksums as the other readable tracks, so I will be able to burn a replacement copy. If anybody else has this problem I should be able to UL a copy of their affected tracks (only) for replacement purposes.

 

Alex

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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Faulty linear power supplies will do that.

 

It was probably ripping it for the 200th time in search of the perfect WAVe that wore the disc out.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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Cunny funt.

It is a well known published fact that the printing inks used by some manufacturers at the time ,ate into the reflective layer over a period of time.

 

Yes, but I believe this caused bronzing not pin holes. The pin holes probably were always there. The aluminum is under a clear coat so the aluminum can't just disappear, only change. Your CD player can probably correct for the missing data whereas this cannot be done when ripping. I had quite a few CD's with defects that played just fine on CD players but could not be ripped. Pin holes are actually very common.

Auralic Aries G2, Ayre QX-5 Twenty, Ayre KX-5 Twenty, Ayre VX-5 Twenty, Revel Ultima Studio2, Iconoclast speaker cables & interconnects, RealTraps acoustic treatments, Sonore opticalModule (X2)

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Yes, but I believe this caused bronzing not pin holes. The pin holes probably were always there. The aluminum is under a clear coat so the aluminum can't just disappear, only change. Your CD player can probably correct for the missing data whereas this cannot be done when ripping. I had quite a few CD's with defects that played just fine on CD players but could not be ripped. Pin holes are actually very common.

 

These pinholes weren't there when I made a backup copy around 2009. One of the pinholes is actually quite large now, and around the size of the head of a pin!

I only posted this information so that others could check their copy and back it up if need be, before it becomes completely unplayable on some tracks.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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That is rather depressing as most people probably consider their CD's as the ultimate backup copy.

Auralic Aries G2, Ayre QX-5 Twenty, Ayre KX-5 Twenty, Ayre VX-5 Twenty, Revel Ultima Studio2, Iconoclast speaker cables & interconnects, RealTraps acoustic treatments, Sonore opticalModule (X2)

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That is rather depressing as most people probably consider their CD's as the ultimate backup copy.

 

Unfortunately, I found another one this morning that I hadn't played for years.

My original West German pressing of "Elton John-Too Low for Zero" is unplayable from track 4 onwards due to what is VERY obviously the printing ink eating into the reflective layer.

Even EAC can't recover it for copying.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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That is rather depressing as most people probably consider their CD's as the ultimate backup copy.

 

Knowing what I know now that is a bad idea.

I read quite a bit about CD Rot for years but never personally experienced it. I ripped around 1,000 in 2008, many going back to the mid-80's without a single read issue, just very lucky I guess. I was beginning to question the validity of the issue. Lately though I've been hearing SO MANY of reports it can't ignored if you value your music. Everything I own is on a hard drive now, backed up to 2 other drives and I've been looking into the options for a cloud backup in case the joint should ever burn to the ground.

 

Not to ignore vinyl but I also ran into issues when ripping all my vinyl around the same time frame. A number of my old LP's that I hadn't spun in 2 or 3 decades were having tracking issues. On close inspection of the grooves refusing to track at all, using a large magnifying glass I witness what were very tiny dimples. Almost as if you took a pin, heated it, and pushed a small divot into the grove. No proof but I attribute it to some type of possible out-gassing of the material with extended age. Never heard anyone else discuss anything like this but it did exist on around a dozen LP's of mine?

"The gullibility of audiophiles is what astonishes me the most, even after all these years. How is it possible, how did it ever happen, that they trust fairy-tale purveyors and mystic gurus more than reliable sources of scientific information?"

Peter Aczel - The Audio Critic

no-mqa-sm.jpg

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That is rather depressing as most people probably consider their CD's as the ultimate backup copy.

 

Manufactured CDs (not CD-Rs) are an extremely reliable medium.

 

CD rot is very rare. When people discover it, it is usually on CDs which were made in the 1980's in a certain pressing plant in the UK, which had a faulty manufacturing procedure.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Disc_bronzing

 

I've been collecting over 4000 CDs since 1986, the bulk of them were bought in the 1990s. I've had a 3CD set from the Hyperion label become unreadable due to CD bronzing, and it was from that UK pressing plant. I got the CDs replaced for free, 12 years after the purchase (that replacement policy has been abandoned now, after the pressing plant closed). No other of my 25+ year old CDs has had problems.

Claude

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Manufactured CDs (not CD-Rs) are an extremely reliable medium.

 

CD rot is very rare. When people discover it, it is usually on CDs which were made in the 1980's in a certain pressing plant in the UK, which had a faulty manufacturing procedure.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Disc_bronzing

 

I've been collecting over 4000 CDs since 1986, the bulk of them were bought in the 1990s. I've had a 3CD set from the Hyperion label become unreadable due to CD bronzing, and it was from that UK pressing plant. I got the CDs replaced for free, 12 years after the purchase (that replacement policy has been abandoned now, after the pressing plant closed). No other of my 25+ year old CDs has had problems.

 

My experience has been similar to yours. I found four CD's that had bronzing, three from Hyperion and one on the ASV label. Hyperion replaced two with free downloads of the same album, the other two I did not care about. Other CD's that I could not rip without errors were mostly due to scratches (some audible, some not) or other visible defects that did not affect CD playback but did prevent ripping.

Auralic Aries G2, Ayre QX-5 Twenty, Ayre KX-5 Twenty, Ayre VX-5 Twenty, Revel Ultima Studio2, Iconoclast speaker cables & interconnects, RealTraps acoustic treatments, Sonore opticalModule (X2)

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CD rot is very rare. When people discover it, it is usually on CDs which were made in the 1980's in a certain pressing plant in the UK, which had a faulty manufacturing procedure.

 

 

I have had several that were made in West Germany. It is due to the printing inks used at the time.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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