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Is Ethernet NAS isolated?


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My NAS is connected to my modem via Ethernet.

 

Is this the same result as having galvanic isolation?

 

Is electrical isolation the same, or a different topic?

 

Would the above set-up obviate the need for a TP-LINK MC200CM gigabit media converter I recently read in a blog on another site?

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Question is too simplistic.

 

NAS's transmit data in the digital domain (Ethernet frames). A voltage contaminant from the NAS has no direct connectivity to travel in reaching a D/A converter that is processing the Ethernet frames into data a DAC can convert. However voltage contaminants can cause transceiver error/re-transmission of frames between NAS and router.... hence why optic Ethernet connections are preferred for serious data transmission. The media converter solution addresses this for router connected devices assuming you use optics for all Ethernet connections in the data flow path.

 

Galvanic isolation usually means you are concerned about asynch USB or a DAC where errors can occur after the Ethernet frame is stripped due to poor USB voltage stability or voltage contaminants affecting D/A processing.

Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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davide256,

Thank you for the complete answer.

 

So I would need to use a fiber optic converter between my Ethernet NAS and my modem/router which I feed music from wirelessly throughout my house? Is that correct?

 

(I have yet to wire an Ethernet cable from our home office to my den's DAC. That will be the next project.)

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davide256,

Thank you for the complete answer.

 

So I would need to use a fiber optic converter between my Ethernet NAS and my modem/router which I feed music from wirelessly throughout my house? Is that correct?

 

(I have yet to wire an Ethernet cable from our home office to my den's DAC. That will be the next project.)

 

Ethernet connections are all transformer coupled so there is an open air component to your hardwired connection on both ends.

 

Here's a good thread:

Why Are Ethernet/RJ45 Sockets Magnetically Coupled? - Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange

 

Also there it no need for optical isolation. Just put in a $30 wireless router setup as wireless access point just for the playback machine and setup it's own SSID. You'll have all the isolation you need and there will no difference in sound quality.

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Ethernet connections are all transformer coupled so there is an open air component to your hardwired connection on both ends.

 

Here's a good thread:

Why Are Ethernet/RJ45 Sockets Magnetically Coupled? - Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange

 

Also there it no need for optical isolation. Just put in a $30 wireless router setup as wireless access point just for the playback machine and setup it's own SSID. You'll have all the isolation you need and there will no difference in sound quality.

 

You do realize that wireless has its own set of complexities, RF interference issues? Whereas optical pretty much needs a bullet for it not to work. Cisco has a very interesting page on all the issues that have to be dealt with for wifi data transmission.

Regards,

Dave

 

Audio system

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You do realize that wireless has its own set of complexities, RF interference issues? Whereas optical pretty much needs a bullet for it not to work. Cisco has a very interesting page on all the issues that have to be dealt with for wifi data transmission.

 

Please post the Cisco link. I do Meraki by Cisco and there are considerations in a space where you are going to be saturating the area with wireless signals.

 

You will find that when you read the Cisco papers they aren't dealing in home environments and they are dealing with density issues for the most part. I should know I setup 802.11X RADIUS PNAC for corporate campuses and part of the architecture team that plans the deployment. I have scripts generated that read from a .csv that literally allow me to program 150 AP's at a time in just two hours.

 

I've yet to see any issues in a home environment and even if there were they wouldn't effect audibility but throughput and AP association. If you can't get wireless working consistently then I doubt your chances on running optical to where you needed it.

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