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New Cary Audio Integrated Amp + DAC with networking and Bluetooth


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SI-300.2d Integrated Amplifier | Cary Audio

 

Their amps and DACS are usually very good. This sounds like quite a good value for the money it the SQ is similar to their stand alone units.

Main listening (small home office):

Main setup: Surge protector +_iFi  AC iPurifiers >Isol-8 Mini sub Axis Power Conditioning+Isolation>QuietPC Low Noise Server>Roon (Audiolense DRC)>Stack Audio Link II>Kii Control>Kii Three >GIK Room Treatments.

Secondary Path: Server with Audiolense RC>RPi4 or analog>Cayin iDAC6 MKII (tube mode) (XLR)>Kii Three .

Bedroom: SBTouch to Cambridge Soundworks Desktop Setup.
Living Room/Kitchen: Ropieee (RPi3b+ with touchscreen) + Schiit Modi3E to a pair of Morel Hogtalare. 

All absolute statements about audio are false :)

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I'm curious to see a review. I hear good things about their tube gear.

I've come close to buying several pieces of Cary gear over the years - everything I've heard sounds excellent, and their stuff seems very well designed and made. So I have no doubt that it will make some excellent sound - but I do have doubts about Cary's claims for it. And I'm a bit put off by its physical size and 52 pound weight, given the available power and SQ from great digital devices with much smaller footprints and weighing a quarter of that or less.

 

I find it hard to believe that it consumes only 950 watts at full power, since that would mean greater than 100% efficiency. If this is a traditional class A/B amp (as is stated by Cary), its maximum efficiency can't possibly exceed 60% at best - so the output stage(s) alone should be sucking up at least a kW to pump 300 watts into 8 ohms on each side. And that would mean that no electrical energy is dissipated by the unit as heat rather than audio output signal, which is almost certainly not the case - I've never encountered an A/B amp that didn't at least get warm at far below its rated output.

 

I'm also getting very tired of statements like "tube like sound from its solid state output devices" in audio descriptions (a direct quote from the Cary website about this unit). With so many great-sounding solid state analog and digital devices, plus some really tight and focused tube units, we need to get away from stereotyping equipment on the basis of its construction and focus instead on describing the sound as accurately and understandably as possible. A high end manufacturer should be leading the pack toward such sanity, not using outmoded marketing tricks to sell product.

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I've owned Cary gear, off and on, over the years including some wonderful pieces. I personally would be careful concerning any of their recent offerings, since Dennis Had, company founder, president, and brilliant designer of all of their famous electronics has not been associated with them for a number of years.

 

JC

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I've come close to buying several pieces of Cary gear over the years - everything I've heard sounds excellent, and their stuff seems very well designed and made. So I have no doubt that it will make some excellent sound - but I do have doubts about Cary's claims for it. And I'm a bit put off by its physical size and 52 pound weight, given the available power and SQ from great digital devices with much smaller footprints and weighing a quarter of that or less.

 

I find it hard to believe that it consumes only 950 watts at full power, since that would mean greater than 100% efficiency. If this is a traditional class A/B amp (as is stated by Cary), its maximum efficiency can't possibly exceed 60% at best - so the output stage(s) alone should be sucking up at least a kW to pump 300 watts into 8 ohms on each side. And that would mean that no electrical energy is dissipated by the unit as heat rather than audio output signal, which is almost certainly not the case - I've never encountered an A/B amp that didn't at least get warm at far below its rated output.

 

I'm also getting very tired of statements like "tube like sound from its solid state output devices" in audio descriptions (a direct quote from the Cary website about this unit). With so many great-sounding solid state analog and digital devices, plus some really tight and focused tube units, we need to get away from stereotyping equipment on the basis of its construction and focus instead on describing the sound as accurately and understandably as possible. A high end manufacturer should be leading the pack toward such sanity, not using outmoded marketing tricks to sell product.

 

I want to say an "amen" to this. I have not been able to figure out the amplifier power equation either. From the low to high end you get ratings that simply don't make sense - a typical 360VA power transformer and an amp rated at something that implies near perfect efficiency or even something greater than what the transformer can deliver. I assume the latter is some kind of "peak" rating that includes the output of the capacitors (added to the output of the transformer in a "peak" situation)??

 

Here is an example of a class A/B amp that is 75% efficient:

 

Odyssey Audio: Stratos Stereo amplifiers. Call us (317) 299 5578. IN, USA.

 

That is a rating of 150 wpc into 8 ohms from a 400VA transformer. No rating is given into 4 ohm, but surely the manufacturer would claim more wpc (even if it does not double) like everyone else, which would imply in even higher efficiency. I don't mean to pick on Odyssey - it just strikes me as a typical example and they seem to even be on the "conservative" side of the ratings game.

 

I admit I may not understand the relationship between transformer ratings and output ratings well.

 

Here is an amp that appears to be "honestly" rated:

 

Rogue Audio Sphinx integrated amplifier Measurements | Stereophile.com

 

A 360VA transformer delivering a total of 310 watts in a class D (80 to 90% efficient I understand) topology - now those numbers seem to add up...

Hey MQA, if it is not all $voodoo$, show us the math!

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