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SACD Ripping using an Oppo or Pioneer? Yes, it's true!


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8 minutes ago, [email protected] said:

How can I know the chip that my player is using? Is there any other players using Mediatek chips MT8580 or MT8560?

 

Lift the hood (bonnet) and inspect.  What player do you have?

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The players are almost all listed in the (updated) opening post. A rare few players are missing (not tested, but very likely to work), such as the Electrocompaniet EMP3 which is based on the Oppo 103, but much more expensive.

Claude

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Since 2013 I had been happily ripping SACD's with my custom-firmware PlayStation 3, until it died last year.
So I'm very grateful to ted_b, Maldur, and other contributors for this new method.  With a Pioneer BDP-160, purchased recently second-hand, I'm now back in business.  I offer the following 3 tips:

 

1. Under Windows 8 the sacd_extract ISO copy from network process works perfectly.
But if I reboot into my Windows XP-SP3 installation on the same computer, the process fails, with this error message:

libsacdread: Can't open 192.168.1.160:2002 for reading

In both cases my firewall software was turned off.  I already know that sacd_extract works fine under Windows XP for SACD extraction from local file sources, say, from ISO to dsf.  But it seems that Windows XP is no good for SACD extraction via network.

 

2. I see people dealing with how to determine the blu-ray player's IP address, and I suggest it's more straightforward to specify a fixed IP address, yourself.
For the Pioneer, connect it to your router, then power up.  In the menu, go to
Network > Information > Next Screen
this will show you the network settings that the player has assigned automatically (by DHCP) on power-up.  Take note of the IP address - in my case 192.168.1.5
Now press "Return" to go back to Network > IP Address Setting > Next Screen
change "Auto Set IP Address" to "Off"
now with the arrow keys you can change the IP address.  Keep the first 3 fields, in my case 192.168.1.
and just change the 4th field to a higher value, such that it should never conflict with other IP addresses handed out by the router.  I chose "160" because this matches my model number, and is easy to remember.
So my fixed IP address is 192.168.1.160.  Keep the existing "Subnet Mask", "Default Gateway" and "DNS1" values - these would have been determined automatically, and remain correct.  I can confirm that these settings are held in memory, even when the unit is fully disconnected from power.
Now when you connect to the blu-ray player from your Windows/Mac/Linux computer, you always know the correct IP address.  You don't need to keep modifying your sacd.cmd file.

 

3. For the problem of dsf files playing back with "clicks" between tracks, this (known) problem has been fixed from the release of sacd_extract ver 0.3.8.
I notice that the download links in the early posts contain sacd_extract 0.3.7, so obviously I suggest everyone should update to 0.3.8 -
https://github.com/sacd-ripper/sacd-ripper/releases

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Oh, and for those wanting cutting edge native DSD playback, check out the Cronus reclocking interface for BeagleBone Black, by Twisted Pear Audio.

This provides a high quality digital transport, but you still need a DSD-compatible D/A converter.

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Just tried the procedure on my oppo 103 with current firmware

the oppo recognizes the USB stick but just goes back to the home menu

the drive does not open

then the program on Windows 7 computer runs but can't connect with the device at that IP address

any ideas ?

did oppo block this facility in thei current firmware.

i have numerous SACD's which would be very nice to transfer

any help would be appreciated

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9 hours ago, Tarainfo said:

I got the files from the Dropbox link

can you point me to a better source for the USB stick files

 

This 89-page thread has many Dropbox links, and they don't all work for the Oppo 103 or 105. I suggest you check out the info in my Oppo-related Word document, whose link is now provided at the bottom of the first post on Page 1.

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I found my error

i was copying the 3 files to the USB stick

instead I copied the folder autoscript containing the. 3 files and it worked right away

i guess the folder name tells the oppo how to proceed

 

thank you

 

 

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12 hours ago, Tarainfo said:

I found my error

i was copying the 3 files to the USB stick

instead I copied the folder autoscript containing the. 3 files and it worked right away

i guess the folder name tells the oppo how to proceed

 

The procedure in my Word document (ref post 1 on page 1 of this thread) already mentioned that those 3 files should be in a folder named Autoscript, but I have now uploaded a modified version that emphasises the importance of the folder name and mentions the 'Failed to connect' error that ISO2DSD will display if you don't do this.

 

On 20/06/2017 at 3:58 PM, audiventory said:

I think, you may slightly reduce the risk if will use root directory. It is issue of both Mac and Windows.

 

However, short target directory name is not guaranteed decission.

The issue must be solved into ISO extractor via "smart" file-name truncation, as implemented in our software.

 

The latest version of my Word doc also contains a new section that summarises the process proposed by Yuri Korzunov on page 88 of this thread for using his software to handle those unusual SACDs whose metadata generates DSF filenames that are still too long for the operating system (Windows, etc), even when Sonore ISO2DSD is stored in a folder with a short name in the root of your chosen drive.

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If you're in the UK and you want a brand new Oppo BDP-103 for around £370, there's a seller with five of them on the UK branch of a certain well-known auction site. This is my first post here so you'll probably think I'm a bot but I've been lurking here for ages, waiting till I could get a player to rip my own SACDs. The seller I'm talking about is called environaudio and he's been trying to sell these players one at a time for ages but no one bites, maybe because it looks too good to be true. But I decided to take a chance and I collected in person because the seller is near to me. So what I can tell you is that it's a 100 per cent legit company called Environ AV & Technology based in Kennington Park Business Centre in The Oval and I collected in person from a friendly engineer and had an interesting chat with him about audio. They are selling these because they are old stock and clients want the latest model. They are boxed, new and completely unused and they are the BDP-103EU model which will play any SACD or DVD-A but only Euro region DVD Video and Blu-ray (though you can buy a device to make it play other regions). I bought mine on Friday, picked it up yesterday and was ripping my first SACD within the hour. I'm ripping another one now! I'm ridiculously thrilled and love this machine  - I've never had an Oppo before and it's beautifully built. Hope this helps someone.

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High speed ripping with the Pioneer DBP-160

 

In an earlier post I was somewhat disappointed by the apparent low speed at which ripping took place with the Pioneer BDP-160 via my wireless network. At certain times the speed of transfer was as low as 0.1 MB/s and remained at that level whatever I tried.

 

I suspected the laptop/player combination over my wireless network not performing optimally.
To increase the network speed, I first tried to connect the player directly to my laptop via ethernet, but I could not get the player to show up on my laptop.
Then I connected separate ethernet cables from both my laptop and the Pioneer player to my network router.

That did the trick. The transfer speed went up to a rocking 2.9 MB/s at the end of the SACD disk.
An average SACD disk can now be ripped in about 20 min to an iso file, not bad.

 

A new problem raised now is 2 x 15m (ca. 50 feet) ethernet cables cross through my apartment, only in the corridor and only on a temporary basis. My wife is not complaining thusfar (luckily).

 

In the otherwise excellent guide for the Pioneer BDP-80FD/BDP-170/160 by HiRezGuy (first post), in the setup under point C only a WiFi connection is mentioned. I would suggest to update this point by mentioning/advising to use ethernet cables in case of a slow transfer speed via a wireless network.

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2 hours ago, KVDB010 said:

Then I connected separate ethernet cables from both my laptop and the Pioneer player to my network router.

That did the trick. The transfer speed went up to a rocking 2.9 MB/s at the end of the SACD disk.

..............................................................................................

In the otherwise excellent guide for the Pioneer BDP-80FD/BDP-170/160 by HiRezGuy (first post), in the setup under point C only a WiFi connection is mentioned. I would suggest to update this point by mentioning/advising to use ethernet cables in case of a slow transfer speed via a wireless network.

I am glad that you have that figured out.  I have always used wired connections for this process (from PS3 or Oppo) but there is more variability in performance of home WiFi than with wired ethernet.  Some have achieved success with it.

Kal Rubinson

Senior Contributing Editor, Stereophile

 

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13 hours ago, KVDB010 said:

In an earlier post I was somewhat disappointed by the apparent low speed at which ripping took place with the Pioneer BDP-160 via my wireless network. At certain times the speed of transfer was as low as 0.1 MB/s and remained at that level whatever I tried.

 

 

Wireless is always an alchemy. The speed depends on connection quality which depends on so many factors - obstacles (and their type) between you and the router (especially walls from concrete, not to speak about metal!), how properly the external antennas are mounted, reflections from walls, and mainly noise from other WiFis from all of your neighbours. The 2.4GHz band is pretty overcrowded everywhere and most people do not even care to configure the channels, so that all routers broadcast on the same default channel (automatic choice of channel is usually not very smart either). Constant streaming applications must thus either be extremely robust or they just have serious issues. I do not expect ripping from a physical media to leave much space for robustness and random delays in transmission. Even though the wireless technology has improved a lot during the last 15 years, it is also much more widely spread and using wires is still much safer and more reliable.

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7 hours ago, wanthalf said:

 

 

Wireless is always an alchemy. The speed depends on connection quality which depends on so many factors - obstacles (and their type) between you and the router (especially walls from concrete, not to speak about metal!), how properly the external antennas are mounted, reflections from walls, and mainly noise from other WiFis from all of your neighbours. The 2.4GHz band is pretty overcrowded everywhere and most people do not even care to configure the channels, so that all routers broadcast on the same default channel (automatic choice of channel is usually not very smart either). Constant streaming applications must thus either be extremely robust or they just have serious issues. I do not expect ripping from a physical media to leave much space for robustness and random delays in transmission. Even though the wireless technology has improved a lot during the last 15 years, it is also much more widely spread and using wires is still much safer and more reliable.

 

You can't go wrong with the consistency of hard wire.

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On 6/30/2017 at 5:00 PM, KVDB010 said:

To increase the network speed, I first tried to connect the player directly to my laptop via ethernet, but I could not get the player to show up on my laptop.

 

For that to work without a 'crossover' ethernet cable to a windows machine, both ends would need gigabit ethernet ports, which would be rare on most A/V equipment, unfortunately.

Auto-MDI/X is optional in the gigabit spec, but I have never seen a gigabit port that didn't support it. 


A 'crossover cable' has one end wired TIA-568A and the other end wired TIA-568B (basically, the positions of the orange and green pairs are swapped). Otherwise, as you discovered, you need an ethernet switch (or another rarity nowadays - a "hub") to connect them. With a crossover cable, unless both ends support Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA - which uses the 169.254.x.x /8 address range), you would still need to set non-identical static IPs in the same subnet on both devices.

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I just want to say that I was very happy to find this thread

Since a week ago I now own a Pioneer BDP-170 (bought from ebay recently)

And after some usb struggle I now can rip SACD to my computer.

 

So, to who it may concern:

Thank you to this finding, it solved my trouble to rip SACD.

 

 

 

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On 9-5-2017 at 1:02 AM, Darryl R said:

I promised to report my findings yesterday, but Amazon didn't deliver the BDP-80FD until today.  As so many others have found, SACD ripping with this new configuration is one of the easiest things I've ever done on a computer:

 

1.  Turn off Autoplay

2.  Connect to LAN (WPS not necessary)

3.  Copy Autoplay folder from BDP160 zip to root of USB stick and insert in front of 80FD (FAT32 not necessary, and you can leave other files on the USB)

4.  Insert SACD

5.  Get IP from File Explorer and run SACD_EXTRACT on PC (static IP not necessary)

 

I also didn't find any relationship between the target folder name and the ISO name.  I guess the poster has a very different system.

 

I ripped a 2.8GB ISO in about 30 minutes.  My network is based on a typical home WiFi router from the cable guy.

Where can i dowload the SACD-extract-BDP160.zip file? For now i found separate files in a Dropbox : AutoScript;AutoScript.TSS;sacd.cmd;sacd_extract and sacd_extract.exe

but nowhere a folder called AutoScript? ("Use the AutoScript folder from SACD-extract-BDP160.zip") 

 

Thnx and best regards,

Léon

 

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5 minutes ago, LeonJehae said:

Where can i dowload the SACD-extract-BDP160.zip file? For now i found separate files in a Dropbox : AutoScript;AutoScript.TSS;sacd.cmd;sacd_extract and sacd_extract.exe

but nowhere a folder called AutoScript? ("Use the AutoScript folder from SACD-extract-BDP160.zip") 

 

Thnx and best regards,

Léon

 

Just found it thanks to the link from : Scar972.......sorry for my impatient.

 

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I know I've seen this before but my searches are failing me.  Why are my dsd rips consistently lower in volume than Redbook or Hi-Res PCM files.  As an example, I turn my Dap up like 10% to play DSD and same with my home stereo.

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