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Elescher
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JRiver owns computervideophile.com. I'm guessing I could persuade them to sell it if necessary :~)

 

 

Could be a good idea.. ;)

What’s true of all the evils in the world is true of plague as well.
It helps men to rise above themselves.
 
  ―  Albert Camus, The Plague.

 

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JRiver owns computervideophile.com. I'm guessing I could persuade them to sell it if necessary :~)

 

On AVSforums, they seem fairly convinced that high res audio is BS and that all DACs sound the same.

 

However, when I suggested that I couldn't tell the difference between a Blu Ray and 720p on my Apple TV from the comfort of my viewing position, they all went nuts on me.

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On AVSforums, they seem fairly convinced that high res audio is BS and that all DACs sound the same.

 

However, when I suggested that I couldn't tell the difference between a Blu Ray and 720p on my Apple TV from the comfort of my viewing position, they all went nuts on me.

What size is your display, and how far away do you sit?

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On AVSforums, they seem fairly convinced that high res audio is BS and that all DACs sound the same.

 

However, when I suggested that I couldn't tell the difference between a Blu Ray and 720p on my Apple TV from the comfort of my viewing position, they all went nuts on me.

Interesting.

 

One thing that so many people overlook or simply don't know is that everything on Apple TV is compressed using very lossy compression. It's just fine for me because video doesn't really excite me unless it's a crazy good home theater, and I don't have the space or money for that.

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

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Yeah, if I losslessly rip a blu ray, is is about 30 Gbytes, so it is > 5-fold compressed. What amazes me is how similar it looks (even up close). Even in those pictures people show to reveal the differences, what impresses me is how good video compression can work.

 

(My investment in AV equipment is primarily to keep other people from touching my audio system.)

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Yeah, if I losslessly rip a blu ray, is is about 30 Gbytes, so it is > 5-fold compressed. What amazes me is how similar it looks (even up close). Even in those pictures people show to reveal the differences, what impresses me is how good video compression can work.

 

(My investment in AV equipment is primarily to keep other people from touching my audio system.)

I agree, the compression is really good.

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

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My Apple TV Mk 3 can play 1080 and the compression quality is really very good. I watched a move this last weekend and never even thought about compression - it was perfect for me. A bluray can be better, but the difference on my small Panasonic 50" is not worth it. Maybe the BD has better audio possibilites for home cinema, I don't know.

 

Let's concentrate on audio only :D

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My Apple TV Mk 3 can play 1080 and the compression quality is really very good. I watched a move this last weekend and never even thought about compression - it was perfect for me. A bluray can be better, but the difference on my small Panasonic 50" is not worth it. Maybe the BD has better audio possibilites for home cinema, I don't know.

 

Let's concentrate on audio only :D

 

Bluray often has 7.1-channel lossless audio. Compared to Netflix streaming, it tends to be markedly better, especially the room-shaking bass effects. That might be a deliberate choice by Netflix or an inevitable result of the Dolby compression (which doesn't have the full dynamic range of lossless audio). I can't say what Apple TV is capable of as I don't have one.

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On AVSforums, they seem fairly convinced that high res audio is BS and that all DACs sound the same. However, when I suggested that I couldn't tell the difference between a Blu Ray and 720p on my Apple TV from the comfort of my viewing position, they all went nuts on me.

You simply gored the wrong ox.

 

laughing-dog-smiley-emoticon.gif

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On AVSforums, they seem fairly convinced that high res audio is BS and that all DACs sound the same.

 

However, when I suggested that I couldn't tell the difference between a Blu Ray and 720p on my Apple TV from the comfort of my viewing position, they all went nuts on me.

 

Yes, they would, wouldn’t they?

 

Trying to ascertain the ‘technical qualities’ of HD video is way, way more fun than comparing 24/192 PCM vs DSD128 audio formats.

 

Beyond the basic resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels (720p) or 1920 x 1080 pixels (1080p), we have:

 

 

  • Encoding (and decoding) video bitrates that range between 5Mbps and 40Mbps. For example, Netflix recommends an Internet connection speed of 5Mbps for HD content. YouTube recommends 5Mbps for uploading of 720p content. Meanwhile, ‘uncompressed’ Blu-Ray A/V streams (currently) max out somewhere @ 40Mbps.
  • Standard frame rates (24/25/30 fps) and High frame rates (48/50/60 fps).
  • Video codecs, of which there are hundreds. Ubiquitous being H.264/MPEG-4, ProRes, XviD/DivX, x264, WMV, VP6, Sorenson, et al.
  • Lossless and lossy audio codecs which include (but are not limited to) various flavours of DTS vs. Dolby, MPEG1/2, AAC, WMA, Vorbis.
  • File containers such as .mp4, .mov, .avi, .wmv, .mkv, .ogg, to contain the multitude of different video and audio codecs.

 

This is all before le content is processed by << your spécifique >> A/V decoder for display by << your spécifique >> HDTV/monitor screen to dazzle << your unique >> pair of peepers.

 

P.S. Apple TV3 supports H.264 video up to 1080p, 60 fps, (High or Main Profile level 4.2 or lower). Obscure specs in parentheses translate, iinw, to 43 - 61Mbps. That’s what Apple says/implies... ;)

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According that chart, you shouldn't be able to see a difference then. If you go closer, can you see the improvement?

 

At close range, I still find it very hard. Even when presented with high-resolution screen-shots of the differences, I struggle to see them. It is rather subtle. Maybe I need to get glasses.

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