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Have you done a backup recently?

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I've been dreaming up a backup solution, and wonder if anyone would find it useful / affordable / worth it. I think I've worked the features and costs out like so:

  • The tool indexes your music library.
  • It tracks changes (file moved or renamed) in a local index that is backed up to the web.
  • It tracks deletes by setting a flag in the index. Removing from cloud backup storage requires a manual step to reach out and actually delete the file. This would address accidentally deleting a file / folder.
  • It tracks additions by re-indexing each night, and incrementally uploading the changes.
  • It can be throttled for performance and bandwidth usage.

Certainly open to input on features.

Still with me?

  • Restoring
    • Can be done by download. This will be SLOW.
    • Can be done by requesting an HDD

Pricing

Storage: Google Drive does 10TB / mo for $99 / mo. I think I could work things out to be $5 / TB / Month.

Restore: This would probably cost $30 / TB for the download option and $30 / TB + $300 to put the data on a drive and ship it.

 

Think of this like a safety deposit box for your audio library with some built-in automation.

 

Please ping me if you're interested to learn more.

 

And please let me know if this is too commercial for me to post. Glad to move the post if it's not appropriate here.

 

 


Musica Pristina A Cappella III (R&D model) > i2s > Musica Pristina Virtuoso DAC > Quad II Eighty > Quad ESL 2905 > Happy Ears

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I have a question that is likely already asked and answered, but I'll shoot anyway.

 

I'm backing up my 11TBs of data from 3 internal drives to a bunch of 2TB external USB drives.

 

How much free space should I leave on each drive to be safe and not over stuff a drive?  I know leaving some space unused is desirable, but not sure how much.

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9 minutes ago, hipstone said:

I have a question that is likely already asked and answered, but I'll shoot anyway.

 

I'm backing up my 11TBs of data from 3 internal drives to a bunch of 2TB external USB drives.

 

How much free space should I leave on each drive to be safe and not over stuff a drive?  I know leaving some space unused is desirable, but not sure how much.

Fill them to the brim. Any advice you've seen recommending some spare room relates to the performance of drives in active use. The reasons are not relevant to backup media.

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There are no old, bold, drives.  x-D

 

Roughly figuring 1862GB per formatted drive.  20-50GB is a safer bet?  If you toss them in a safe for 5 years or spin them up twice a year might be a factor.  Hard drive life is hard to predict.

 

One argument for brimming them is data can be retrieved off a heavily damaged drive much less one that just sorta gave up.

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I have a local backup on my NAS that gets backed up and versioned every day, that goes to an identical NAS offsite at my Brothers house. We share space on each others NAS.

 

The backup isn't my local library either, that's separate. The NAS we use is this model from ioSafe.

 

https://iosafe.com/products-1517-nas-overview

 

edit: never mind, I see I mentioned this already!  haha.

 


No electron left behind...

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43 minutes ago, AudioDoctor said:

I have a local backup on my NAS that gets backed up and versioned every day, that goes to an identical NAS offsite at my Brothers house. We share space on each others NAS.

 

The backup isn't my local library either, that's separate. The NAS we use is this model from ioSafe.

 

https://iosafe.com/products-1517-nas-overview

 

edit: never mind, I see I mentioned this already!  haha.

 

 

This writ large - backing up peer-to-peer to other individuals' locations, a sort of BitTorrent for backup - is something I'd love to see take over from paid backup. But to be practical it will have to wait for everyone to have 6G or whatever the ultrafast connectivity of the future might be, along with cheap enough storage that people have multiple terabytes to spare.


One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> router -> 2 Cisco switches connected by optical Ethernet -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen (powered by LPS-1) -> Ghent JSSG360 USB cable -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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19 minutes ago, Jud said:

 

This writ large - backing up peer-to-peer to other individuals' locations, a sort of BitTorrent for backup - is something I'd love to see take over from paid backup. But to be practical it will have to wait for everyone to have 6G or whatever the ultrafast connectivity of the future might be, along with cheap enough storage that people have multiple terabytes to spare.

 

Having Fiber connections make it easier, although once the initial backup is done, the only real big files going over to the other NAS are the new files, which are pretty quick.

 

Not trusting the cloud made the decision easier for both of us as well as having the funds to actually do it.


No electron left behind...

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My NAS is in a RAID 1 configuration and I also backup to 2 external drives periodically.

 

I just bought a new 5 TB drive to backup to this past weekend. Takes about 7 hours to do a full backup of my library.

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I don't use backup software to backup my music folders and files, I have batch files that I use to copy everything to two other computers across my network, as well as three different external drives, one of which I use on my Oppo player. The external drives are always offline (read off and unplugged) when not backing up and one is kept in a fire safe. 

 

I use Macrium Reflect to backup my primary drives, and I worry more about those than the secondary music drives (since I already have 6 copies). Macrium makes images, much like Norton Ghost did. If the primary dies (or if I want to put a newer/faster drive in), I plug in the rescue media, boot up, restore the image from the secondary drive, and restart the computer. 

 

I just couldn't justify the cost of a NAS. 

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The two most popular backup programs for Mac are SuperDuper and Carbon Copy Cloner.  Both have been around for many years and are very reliable.

 

Smart Backup is free, but I haven’t tried it:

https://solesignal.com/smartbackup4/

 

Of course, the built-in rsync program is free, but I assume you don’t want to mess with geeky Terminal commands.  

 

(Carbon Copy Cloner and Smart Backup actually use rsync, so they can be thought of as user-friendly configuration interfaces for rsync.  I believe SuperDuper uses lower level system commands rather than rsync.)


Mac Mini (2012 i7) > HQPlayer or Audirvana > exaSound e32 > Parasound JC-1 > Thiel 3.7

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23 minutes ago, Bob Stern said:

The two most popular backup programs for Mac are SuperDuper and Carbon Copy Cloner.  Both have been around for many years and are very reliable.

 

Smart Backup is free, but I haven’t tried it:

https://solesignal.com/smartbackup4/

 

Of course, the built-in rsync program is free, but I assume you don’t want to mess with geeky Terminal commands.  

 

(Carbon Copy Cloner and Smart Backup actually use rsync, so they can be thought of as user-friendly configuration interfaces for rsync.  I believe SuperDuper uses lower level system commands rather than rsync.)

 

I use Carbon Copy Cloner and recommend it wholeheartedly. One of the advantages of programs like this is that they do a smart copy and only copy over the files that have changed or have been added, greatly reducing the time required for a backup.


“All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone listening to music.”

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I usually do incremental backups weekly (to three different HD's and save them in different places in the house).


Current:  JRiver 24 on Win 10 PC (AMD Ryzen 5 2600 with 32 GB RAM) or Daphile on an I5-2500K with 16 GB RAM

DAC - TEAC UD-501 DAC 

Pre-amp - Audio Research SP-16

Amplification - Kenwood L-07M Monoblocks

Speakers: Wharfedale Linton Heritage

Cables: MIT speaker cables and DiMarzio Interconnects

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23 hours ago, kumakuma said:

 

I use Carbon Copy Cloner and recommend it wholeheartedly. One of the advantages of programs like this is that they do a smart copy and only copy over the files that have changed or have been added, greatly reducing the time required for a backup.

Do you use Cloner instead of Time Machine? My iTunes files seem to be corrupted by time machine.

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24 minutes ago, mansr said:

I don't use Macs.

 

what about emacs?


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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so you just don't want your eunuchs to have apple?


"The overwhelming majority [of audiophiles] have very little knowledge, if any, about the most basic principles and operating characteristics of audio equipment. They often base their purchasing decisions on hearsay, and the preaching of media sages. Unfortunately, because of commercial considerations, much information is rooted in increasing revenue, not in assisting the audiophile. It seems as if the only requirements for becoming an "authority" in the world of audio is a keyboard."

-- Bruce Rozenblit of Transcendent Sound

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On 8/9/2019 at 3:18 PM, cambridgehank said:

Do you use Cloner instead of Time Machine? My iTunes files seem to be corrupted by time machine.


I use both: TM to back up my system/work drive and CCC to clone external media drives on a weekly basis.

 

BTW, a full restore from TM can take a very long time so I also create clones of my system drive on a weekly basis as well.

 

Don't know anything about iTunes. I use JRiver instead.


“All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone listening to music.”

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