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Raw DSD and Linux. I'm confused...


Norton
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I have a DAC which I understand can accept raw DSD. I am also running Ubuntu 16.04 which I understand works "out of the box"with raw DSD. But I can't get replay via raw DSd to work.

From the HQ player thread it was suggested this is because Linux doesn't "know" my DAC is so capable. Can someone explain what this means, how the Linux kernel "knows" whether a specific DAC is so capable and what has to happen to make this work?

 

The significant factor in my set up being that raw DSD is necessary for my DAC to accept DSD256.

 

Thanks

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Some of the DAC's on the market require software that the Linux OS doesn't provide in order to do "native" DSD. My DAC has the "Amanero" USB board, and will only do native DSD with Windows OS. Which DAC do you have?

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Some of the DAC's on the market require software that the Linux OS doesn't provide in order to do "native" DSD. My DAC has the "Amanero" USB board, and will only do native DSD with Windows OS. Which DAC do you have?

 

Thanks, it's an Esoteric K07x. I think the DAC section is very similar to the TEAC 503, so interested if that works with raw DSD via Ubuntu.

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DAC's need to be added to Linux in order to support native DSD. So your version of Linux and DAC firmware might need to be updated to the latest releases. Note that it is actually the USB board part of the DAC that is affected.

 

This might be of interest: https://github.com/lintweaker/xmos-native-dsd

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Rogue Audio DragoN > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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DAC's need to be added to Linux in order to support native DSD. So your version of Linux and DAC firmware might need to be updated to the latest releases. Note that it is actually the USB board part of the DAC that is affected.

 

This might be of interest: https://github.com/lintweaker/xmos-native-dsd

 

Thanks, yes that is very useful. I'm using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Forgive my ignorance but would developments listed on that site feed swiftly into updates to Ununtu via the software manager? I'm still not clear though what "added to Linux " actually involves, and why it has to be done on a DAC by DAC basis rather than generically for supported USB boards.

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Thanks, yes that is very useful. I'm using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Forgive my ignorance but would developments listed on that site feed swiftly into updates to Ununtu via the software manager? I'm still not clear though what "added to Linux " actually involves, and why it has to be done on a DAC by DAC basis rather than generically for supported USB boards.

 

Added to Linux would mean you need a software driver to be installed for your dac and be using a certain version of Linux (usually the newest version). As far as Ubuntu adding those types of drivers to the repositories, its not likely. Very few people know what a high end dac is, and that it even needs drivers. Your best bet would be to go the your dac's website and download the latest software. Make sure you download for Ubuntu/Debian, as there probably be more than one choice. Once downloaded, open and install it with Gdebi package manager. Also, use Synaptic for software and updates. Its better than using Ubuntu software center.

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Thanks, yes that is very useful. I'm using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Forgive my ignorance but would developments listed on that site feed swiftly into updates to Ununtu via the software manager? I'm still not clear though what "added to Linux " actually involves, and why it has to be done on a DAC by DAC basis rather than generically for supported USB boards.

 

I am not sure how all this works other than the DAC or USB board mfg needs to submit "something" to the Linux guys as noted on the link provided. Once the Linux guys "approve" then it is added to standard Linux distributions.

 

There is some communication between the DAC or USB board and the various music players so that the players know what is supported (e.g. Native DSD128). I am guessing this is part of that communication.

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Rogue Audio DragoN > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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