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Suggestions for inexpensive solutions to connect pc to home stereo via wifi


alhambra
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I'm just getting started on a project to convert my cd collection to flac files and have found lots of helpful info here on the ripping process. However, I'm still having some trouble understanding all the hardware options. Eventually (2-3 years), I will probably change/upgrade all my equipment, but for the moment I just hope to be able to put together something that works and sounds ok with my existing equipment and keep the cost of whatever I have to buy under $250 if possible.

 

 

I am looking for a wifi solution because my desktop computer sits in my office, about 20ft from the family room where the stereo resides. My computer is new and has 802.11ac built in. My stereo is driven by a Rotel RX-1052 receiver. This unit has a "computer" input on the back which is an RJ45 connection. All other connections are RCA. Right now, the only music I have is my cd collection, so I don't need hardware that supports high resolution files. It sounds like I also need a USB DAC to improve the sound quality of the music coming from the pc.

 

I found one product that seems to be a match - Audio Engine W3. Will this actually meet my needs? I have seen a lot of positive reviews of this brand, but would love to hear about other options to consider.

 

Thanks in advance for the help!

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I'm going to chime in here, just to be included in notifications on this thread.

 

I'm probably the least technical member of CA, but you may have trouble doing this for $250. Wireless USB might work but I don't know if it would handle all the data. You can also buy USB extenders (wired) that reach 30 feet.

 

The Dragonfly DAC may be what you could use to go from USB to your amp.

 

http://www.amazon.com/AudioQuest-DragonFly-Converter-Discontinued-Manufacturer/dp/B00882U782

 

May want to explore using the Jitterbug filter with this also.

 

http://www.audioquest.com/jitterbug/jitterbug

 

 

Also this: to run cat5 from your PC to your stereo, in the wall. Holy Crap! What a link.

 

https://www.google.com/shopping/product/17655731637493953027?aqs=iphoneapp2..43.8800jjjjjjjj4jjjjjjj9&ctzn=America/Chicago&q=usb+repeater+&rlz=1MDAPLA_enUS622US622&biw=375&oq=usb+repeater+&hl=en&apps=ma&channel=iss&pbx=1&client=mobilesearchapp&v=14.0.119004557&tch=6&noj=1&wf=pp1&ion=0&ie=UTF-8&bih=647&prds=paur:ClkAsKraXwKd-FfdSlE1ycfd49LIIved3z_8r6NgUevfdJwqqhF7y23KwN0fv-4-t9aUeBUztX-TcZtmGKuQGeY-LwJK86z0jjwh3NqOyuu_8CkZKxLdrvvC9BIZAFPVH72t2fzjnHnSSoa5JfvHuYTYNJ0WfA&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjy5O_MpaHMAhUBlYMKHUUkAJAQ8wIIigEwBA

 

 

 

 

There now I have mucked it all up. Standby for some brilliant solutions from CA members who can really help you.

That I ask questions? I am more concerned about being stupid than looking like I might be.

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This is $100 over your budget but it's so simple, good and so rock solid that you'll be happy you spent the extra. Has a decent dac but can be upgraded later if you want. Is a portal to pretty much ANY streaming music service available. Plays your local files from any computer on your network and is controlled by one of the best interfaces out there via your smart phone or tablet.

 

CONNECT - WiFi Stereo Receiver Adapter | Sonos

 

image.png

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David

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I don't know what the RJ 45 was for a decade ago when your Rotel first came out, but I'm almost certain there's no DLNA player inside - so I think you can ignore it. The easiest & cheapest way to bring your music files to your receiver & play them is probably a Raspberry Pi 3 for about $40 and one of the Dragonflies. The Pi has built-in WiFi "ac", so all you need to do is load a player on it. I run JRMC on mine, but there are many excellent free players for Linux.

 

There's a DAC in the Pi' s chipset powering a headphone jack that you can connect directly to a line level input on the Rotel. It won't sound as good as a D'fly, but it'll get you started.

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Do you already have wifi setup with a wireless router?

 

What music player software, if any are you running on your computer? ITunes, JRMC, Roon, etc.?

 

Are you OK with leaving your computer on all the time?

 

How big is your online music collection? Do you plan to RIP a lot of CDs in the future, convert vinyl records to digital, any thing like that?

 

And lastly, do you have a smartphone or tablet device you can control the music playback with? Which model?

 

The suggestions are easier than the questions, but kinda depend upon what you want to do and where you want to go. ;)

Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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$35 Raspberry Pi and a $35 Chromecast Audio. 100% wireless, been using for nearly 6 months now, 100% sold on it.

 

My source is a Synology NAS (you can use any external HDD) that connects to the Pi and then wirelessly streams to the CCA which connects to the DAC. You can use the CCA for everything from Tidal and Spotify to streaming services. Highly recommend this route.

 

PS: I have the Sonos Connect and for the money it does not do a lot more in comparison to the $35 CCA.

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world - Martin Luther

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$35 Raspberry Pi and a $35 Chromecast Audio. 100% wireless, been using for nearly 6 months now, 100% sold on it. My source is a Synology NAS (you can use any external HDD) that connects to the Pi and then wirelessly streams to the CCA which connects to the DAC. You can use the CCA for everything from Tidal and Spotify to streaming services. Highly recommend this route.

That's another great solution, but there may be a few flies in the ointment.

 

  1. His PC has integral ac WiFi. He can use it as his music server (at no cost) with Foobar2000 etc - he doesn't need another device for that.
  2. He'll need a WiFi network in any case, which means buying a router if he doesn't already have one. Chromecast Audio doesn't stream directly from the source to the CCA device.
  3. With a WiFi-enabled PC, he doesn't need a Pi at all. Chromecast Audio Stream (for PC) and Soundflower + Soundcast (for Mac) will do the job nicely. He can just buy a CCA and plug it into the Rotel.
  4. The DAC in the CCA is almost certainly no better than the one in the Pi. So if he's going to use direct audio out from CCA, he might as well use the Pi as his player and connect its analog audio output directly to a line level input on his Rotel. Again, he doesn't need the CCA in addition to a Pi.
  5. If he uses a CCA as the WiFi receiver but wants a better DAC, he can use the optical output from the CCA to drive a separate DAC. But he could drive a separate DAC via USB from a Pi, too.

I simply don't see any need for the OP to buy both a Pi (or Beaglebone etc) and a Chromecast Audio device. I assume you either do not have a computer you're willing to use as the server or believe that the sound quality will be significantly better if you use a dedicated music server. Having tried many variants of each, I haven't found any degradation in SQ using my PC as the server. But there are many who disagree, so it's an individual choice.

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I don't know how to reply to multiple responses in one message, so I'll just put everything here.

 

First, thanks to all for the feedback!

 

I will first try to provide the additional information about my needs:

 

I currently use my desktop computer to listen to Rhapsody while working. I almost never listen to cds on it. I use my stereo exclusively for listening to cds. I hadn't been thinking about it, but it would be nice if I could also access Rhapsody from my stereo.

 

My music collection consists of about 1500 cds (none high resolution) and a few hundred albums. I am not exactly sure what you mean by online music collection. I have just started to rip my cds, but wanted to sort out my hardware before doing all 1500. I don't currently have a turntable, so will not tackle converting the albums for some time (although it would be helpful to know if I will need additional hardware/software to handle that).

 

I have a wifi network set up that is currently used by my pc, a printer and a couple of laptops. I am fine leaving my computer on all the time.

 

I do have an iPhone 5s and would like to be able to use that as my "remote" for the stereo. However, I don't want to use iTunes as my music player and was thinking about JRiver as an option.

 

As for the suggestions people have offered so far (although I might not fully understand each product):

 

The Sonos certainly looks like an easy solution, but is more money than I would like to spend.

 

The Raspberry Pi appeals from a cost perspective, but I have limited computer skills and am concerned this might be over my head. It also sounds like Bluesman and Master are proposing to use it in two different ways if I understand their suggestions. Bluesman would have me use the Dragonfly as an external DAC for my computer and use the Pi as my wireless stereo connection, while Master seems to say use the Pi as the external DAC for my computer and the Chromecast as the wireless stereo connection. Am I getting that right?

 

I have read a lot of great things about the Dragonfly.

 

From this equipment, I like the idea of potentially combining the Dragonfly with the Chromecast. That would seem to give me a better DAC and a less technically daunting wireless connection to my stereo, while also giving me access to music streaming services like Rhapsody. Does this sound like a good idea?

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I simply don't see any need to buy both a Pi (or Beaglebone etc) and a Chromecast Audio device. There doesn't seem to me to be any benefit.

 

Not for streaming local content, the CCA is for online streaming - the likes of Spotify, Tidal, iHeartRadio, Slacker, etc. Not all of them can be done via the Pi and I've over 30 streaming stations/services - excellent music discovery tools across all genres. Plus the optical from the CCA to any DAC certainly improves the SQ. Personally I don't and wouldn't be advising anyone to be using the DAC of either the Pi or the CCA. Even budget DACs from the likes of SMSL and Schiit score over them.

 

The Pi is to run the server/streamer/player (MinimServer, Moode, etc.) and connect to the media/HDD.

 

You are right, it can be done via the PC too (I've used Foobar, JRiver and JPlay 2 PC setup in the past). I just feel the Pi is better considering it hardly takes any resources and the energy and space savings are in its favor.

 

Both the Pi and CCA complement each other nicely (local streaming + online streaming), plus the $70 price tag for both doesn't hurt much.

 

I assume you either do not have a computer you're willing to use as the server or believe that the sound quality will be significantly better if you use a dedicated music server. Having tried many variants of each, I haven't found any degradation in SQ using my PC as the server. But there are many who disagree, so it's an individual choice.

 

This too. It was not the SOC/SBC over the PC, but going wireless that improved things a lot in the SQ department. PC with Foobar + BubbleUPnP Foobar Addon was pretty much near the same or indistinguishable from the Pi or the NAS. But the Pi + NAS do have somethings in their favor like less noise, heat, RAID, automated backups, etc. and some cons like being headless and needing a smartphone/tablet, as well as needing a more hands on approach in installing and tweaking the s/w. Both work, I just favor the less heat, less energy consumption, and not needing a full on PC route.

 

FWIW, I've seen a setup consisting of only Dynaudio Xeo 6 and a Chromecast Audio. Beats me... but the guy sure was very happy with the performance and the simplicity.

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world - Martin Luther

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Master seems to say use the Pi as the external DAC for my computer and the Chromecast as the wireless stereo connection. Am I getting that right?

 

Nope. Use the Pi as the streamer/server and for local content. The CCA is not needed, but hey its $35 and you can stream a ton of free content. Also, if you add multiple CCAs you can stream from the same Pi (or any PC/server) to multiple CCAs and different rooms.

 

A lot depends if you listen to the likes of Tidal, Spotify, etc. If you do then the CCA is a good addition. If you also want to have multiple local hubs and the ability to stream to each of them i.e. multiple rooms/zones then the cheapest (and easiest) way to do this is to add multiple CCAs.

 

Either scenario, I'd recommend an external DAC - certainly not the Pi or the CCA for DAC duties.

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world - Martin Luther

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The NAD DAC 2 might be an option. Just found this during a Google search so I have no used it myself but NAD has a good reputation in general. It is priced at $250 which fits your budget.

 

http://www.amazon.com/DAC-Wireless-Digital-Analog-Converter/dp/B00DUKO3KA

 

So you would connect the smaller NAD unit to your office computer using USB. Then connect the larger NAD piece to your Rotel amp using the RCA jacks.

 

Obviously tons of other options but this looks very clean. The other options would most likely include some type of wireless access point (e.g. Apple Airport Express) near your amp connected to some type of remote player (small computer) which is then connected to a DAC which is then connect to your Rotel. This means several pieces of equipment & additional cost.

 

As for ripping CD's, highly recommend dBpoweramp. One of the feature is AccurateRip which checks the rip against a database to ensure that the rip is accurate. Also, suggest ripping to AIFF format.

Eric


Ubuntu Studio Linux box (i7-9700, 8 cores, 16GB RAM, Intel X520-DA1 NIC, HQP Desktop) > fiber optic > MikroTik CRS305-1G-4S+ > fiber optic > fitlet2 (Linux Mint - HQP NAA) > T+A DAC8 DSD > Rogue Audio DragoN > Klipsch La Scala — digital volume control with HQP via Roon client, DSP with HQP convolution engine, Intel NUC (Roon server)

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Thanks for the really clear answers. At this point, I really suggest that David's suggestion of a Sono's connect will really suit you well.

 

To begin with, it is *all* you have to buy, save for a set of RCA interconnect cables.

 

Here's how that would go...

 

1. Plug the Sono's connect into your receiver with the interconnect cables, then power it on.

 

2. Load the free Sonos's controller software on your PC, and point it to the top level folder where you are keeping your music.

 

3. Use the Sono's controller software to find the Connect, then join it to your existing Wireless network.

 

4. Load the Sonos controller on your iPhone, set the receiver input to the connection the Sonos, and play your music.

​Including Rhapsody, and Apple Music, Tidal, Spotify, and dozens of other online sources. All from the same interface. My wife loves Sonos.

 

If you decide to later add a Sonos speaker system to your office, or bedroom, or to your Television, they will all play the music for you, and you can control them all from your iPhone.

 

There are technical solutions that would work just as well as Sonos, but the key here is you are not dealing with high resolution (i.e. greater than CD quality) music. Sonos is a dang near perfect fit. And the best part, if you decide within the first 45 days that you don't like it - you can send it back. :)

 

Also, you can buy the Sonos from places like Best Buy and get 6 months no interest to pay for it. Amazon has a similar offer I think.

 

-Paul

 

 

I don't know how to reply to multiple responses in one message, so I'll just put everything here.

 

First, thanks to all for the feedback!

 

I will first try to provide the additional information about my needs:

 

I currently use my desktop computer to listen to Rhapsody while working. I almost never listen to cds on it. I use my stereo exclusively for listening to cds. I hadn't been thinking about it, but it would be nice if I could also access Rhapsody from my stereo.

 

My music collection consists of about 1500 cds (none high resolution) and a few hundred albums. I am not exactly sure what you mean by online music collection. I have just started to rip my cds, but wanted to sort out my hardware before doing all 1500. I don't currently have a turntable, so will not tackle converting the albums for some time (although it would be helpful to know if I will need additional hardware/software to handle that).

 

I have a wifi network set up that is currently used by my pc, a printer and a couple of laptops. I am fine leaving my computer on all the time.

 

I do have an iPhone 5s and would like to be able to use that as my "remote" for the stereo. However, I don't want to use iTunes as my music player and was thinking about JRiver as an option.

 

As for the suggestions people have offered so far (although I might not fully understand each product):

 

The Sonos certainly looks like an easy solution, but is more money than I would like to spend.

 

The Raspberry Pi appeals from a cost perspective, but I have limited computer skills and am concerned this might be over my head. It also sounds like Bluesman and Master are proposing to use it in two different ways if I understand their suggestions. Bluesman would have me use the Dragonfly as an external DAC for my computer and use the Pi as my wireless stereo connection, while Master seems to say use the Pi as the external DAC for my computer and the Chromecast as the wireless stereo connection. Am I getting that right?

 

I have read a lot of great things about the Dragonfly.

 

From this equipment, I like the idea of potentially combining the Dragonfly with the Chromecast. That would seem to give me a better DAC and a less technically daunting wireless connection to my stereo, while also giving me access to music streaming services like Rhapsody. Does this sound like a good idea?

Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never dealt with a cat DAC.

Robert A. Heinlein

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I don't know how to reply to multiple responses in one message, so I'll just put everything here.

 

First, thanks to all for the feedback!

 

I will first try to provide the additional information about my needs:

 

I currently use my desktop computer to listen to Rhapsody while working. I almost never listen to cds on it. I use my stereo exclusively for listening to cds. I hadn't been thinking about it, but it would be nice if I could also access Rhapsody from my stereo.

 

My music collection consists of about 1500 cds (none high resolution) and a few hundred albums. I am not exactly sure what you mean by online music collection. I have just started to rip my cds, but wanted to sort out my hardware before doing all 1500. I don't currently have a turntable, so will not tackle converting the albums for some time (although it would be helpful to know if I will need additional hardware/software to handle that).

 

I have a wifi network set up that is currently used by my pc, a printer and a couple of laptops. I am fine leaving my computer on all the time.

 

I do have an iPhone 5s and would like to be able to use that as my "remote" for the stereo. However, I don't want to use iTunes as my music player and was thinking about JRiver as an option.

 

As for the suggestions people have offered so far (although I might not fully understand each product):

 

The Sonos certainly looks like an easy solution, but is more money than I would like to spend.

 

The Raspberry Pi appeals from a cost perspective, but I have limited computer skills and am concerned this might be over my head. It also sounds like Bluesman and Master are proposing to use it in two different ways if I understand their suggestions. Bluesman would have me use the Dragonfly as an external DAC for my computer and use the Pi as my wireless stereo connection, while Master seems to say use the Pi as the external DAC for my computer and the Chromecast as the wireless stereo connection. Am I getting that right?

 

I have read a lot of great things about the Dragonfly.

 

From this equipment, I like the idea of potentially combining the Dragonfly with the Chromecast. That would seem to give me a better DAC and a less technically daunting wireless connection to my stereo, while also giving me access to music streaming services like Rhapsody. Does this sound like a good idea?

 

If you are on a budget and want to get started without spending too much, try Clementine Music Player (Works on Mac, PC and Linux). Its free and is much better than iTunes. It plays FLAC files and has a very good remote that will work with your iPhone. For Ripping CD's you can download another free program called EAC. A lot of people don't like it because it can be confusing to set up. However, there are a couple of good set up guides for it on the internet. They walk you through a step by step process that takes about 20 minutes to complete. Once set up, its easy to use and is at least as good as any other ripping software, paid or free.

 

For hardware, the Dragonfly should work fine. I have one myself. Honestly, it isn't the best dac you can buy, but if you're on a budget it will get the job done for now. And I would stop right there. Since your PC is only 20ft away, I would just run a cable and be done with it. No need to complicate everything to go wireless if you don't have to. I would, however split the difference on the cables. It would probably be best to get a USB extender cable for a meter or two. Put the Dragonfly on the end of that and run a cable from the Dragonfly to your stereo for the rest of it.

 

Going this route, the only money you need to spend will be on the DAC ($150) and some cables ($25-$50). Also, the setup will be very quick and easy. Later on, you can always upgrade.

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+1 on the Chromecast Audio. If you install BubbleUpnP Server (free) on your PC, you can send music files straight to the CCA using either JRiver ($50) or foobar 2000 (free) as your music player. The CCA is a damn fine renderer and frees you from all that USB palaver. The DAC on the CCA is not bad or you can connect it to a more high end DAC if and when you can afford it. Total expenditure $35.

Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

- Einstein

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I have read a lot of great things about the Dragonfly.

 

From this equipment, I like the idea of potentially combining the Dragonfly with the Chromecast. That would seem to give me a better DAC and a less technically daunting wireless connection to my stereo, while also giving me access to music streaming services like Rhapsody. Does this sound like a good idea?

I don't see how you could combine the Dragonfly with the Chromecast. The digital out on the Chromecast is optical and the only input on the Dragonfly is USB. I only have the original Dragonfly, but I don't think that's changed.

Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

- Einstein

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Not sure how much the Auralic Aries Mini would be $ over budget, but it's an extremely good product for the money, might be circa $100 over (I'm in UK so only know the price in £).

 

I would expect it to sonically out perform most of the competition at it's price and considerably higher.

 

Sometimes it's worth pushing the boat out a little, this is definitely one of those times.

 

;-)

Source:

*Aurender N100 (no internal disk : LAN optically isolated via FMC with *LPS) > DIY 5cm USB link (5v rail removed / ground lift switch - split for *LPS) > Intona Industrial (injected *LPS / internally shielded with copper tape) > DIY 5cm USB link (5v rail removed / ground lift switch) > W4S Recovery (*LPS) > DIY 2cm USB adaptor (5v rail removed / ground lift switch) > *Auralic VEGA (EXACT : balanced)

 

Control:

*Jeff Rowland CAPRI S2 (balanced)

 

Playback:

2 x Revel B15a subs (balanced) > ATC SCM 50 ASL (balanced - 80Hz HPF from subs)

 

Misc:

*Via Power Inspired AG1500 AC Regenerator

LPS: 3 x Swagman Lab Audiophile Signature Edition (W4S, Intona & FMC)

Storage: QNAP TS-253Pro 2x 3Tb, 8Gb RAM

Cables: DIY heavy gauge solid silver (balanced)

Mains: dedicated distribution board with 5 x 2 socket ring mains, all mains cables: Mark Grant Black Series DSP 2.5 Dual Screen

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I,ve tried most of the options, Mac mini, Aries, AirPlay, all of them take time and effort with some frustration.

 

The best user friendly setup that I've ever owned without any issues is a sonos connect, may be over budget but get one on a trail, buy once with no regrets.

Nothing wrong with iTunes, it will give you less hassle than jriver, I don't use it anymore.

Also if you go the sonos route with Apple Music you don't need any computers on to serve media, just stream all your music and radio stations.

I've now added play1 speakers in most rooms for background music.

It's the only system I've not wanted to change and the wife can use it with zero issues.

Setup:

Lumin D2> Roksan Blak> Focal 806

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I'm just getting started on a project to convert my cd collection to flac files and have found lots of helpful info here on the ripping process. However, I'm still having some trouble understanding all the hardware options. Eventually (2-3 years), I will probably change/upgrade all my equipment, but for the moment I just hope to be able to put together something that works and sounds ok with my existing equipment and keep the cost of whatever I have to buy under $250 if possible.

 

 

I am looking for a wifi solution because my desktop computer sits in my office, about 20ft from the family room where the stereo resides. My computer is new and has 802.11ac built in. My stereo is driven by a Rotel RX-1052 receiver. This unit has a "computer" input on the back which is an RJ45 connection. All other connections are RCA. Right now, the only music I have is my cd collection, so I don't need hardware that supports high resolution files. It sounds like I also need a USB DAC to improve the sound quality of the music coming from the pc.

 

I found one product that seems to be a match - Audio Engine W3. Will this actually meet my needs? I have seen a lot of positive reviews of this brand, but would love to hear about other options to consider.

 

Thanks in advance for the help!

 

Computer Audiophile - The Complete Guide To HiFi UPnP / DLNA Network Audio

 

My ethernet LAN is configured for 1000-base-T. Stay far away from wi-fi.

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So Sonos seems to be getting a lot of support as the easiest solution for me. My only real reservation is that it is over my budget. Ericuco recommended the NAD DAC 2. This also seems to be an easy solution. Does anyone have thoughts about the relative merits of these two units?

 

Snowmonkey:

 

I thought the way to combine the Dragonfly and the CCA would be to plug the dragonfly into a usb on my computer where it would serve as the DAC. Music could then be streamed via the internal wireless of my pc to the CCA which would be attached to my stereo via rca plugs. At least that's the way I thought it should work. Am I wrong? Also, I don't know what the BubbleUpnP Server is and why I need it.

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So Sonos seems to be getting a lot of support as the easiest solution for me. My only real reservation is that it is over my budget. Ericuco recommended the NAD DAC 2. This also seems to be an easy solution. Does anyone have thoughts about the relative merits of these two units?

 

Snowmonkey:

 

I thought the way to combine the Dragonfly and the CCA would be to plug the dragonfly into a usb on my computer where it would serve as the DAC. Music could then be streamed via the internal wireless of my pc to the CCA which would be attached to my stereo via rca plugs. At least that's the way I thought it should work. Am I wrong? Also, I don't know what the BubbleUpnP Server is and why I need it.

 

BubbleUPnP Server

 

 

 

I've tested several server components and found this to be the best of the lot as far as sound quality and ease of use.

 

This link is quite comprehensive of configuration and troubleshooting.

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