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A few non-accurate rips from a CD


audiophile65
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Yesterday, I ripped a brand new CD, The Amanda Albums (a Sheffield Lab CD that has the 2 albums of vocalist Amanda McBroom and musician Lincoln Mayorga), into my Mac. I use XLD when ripping all CD's. The XLD "report" on the first album, "Growing Up In Hollywood Town", said "all tracks accurately ripped". The XLD "report" on the second album, "West Of Oz", indicated that tracks 5,6,7, and 8 (of a total of 10 tracks) did not rip accurately.

 

This is a first for me in my 3 years of ripping CDs (not too many CDs, though). Is there anything I can do about this, or can anyone offer advice or share any similar experiences?

 

Thanks.....

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You can try using a supposed clarifying product like optrix on the disc's play surface, or you can try polishing the disc's play surface. Or you can try ripping with a different optical disc drive.

 

But in my experience, some discs, even when brand new and visually perfect-looking, have some kind of manufacturing issue that prevents them from being ripped accurately, even though they play just fine.

 

One final note: if there is only one other rip of the CD in the AccurateRip database, then it's possible that your rip is accurate and the other person's is not accurate (or that they're both inaccurate, but in different ways).

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IMHO. Bit Perfect is overrated as it doesn't tell the full story. A few minor errors are usually inaudible and will not affect the overall SQ.

If the tracks sound fine when played after ripping don't worry about it.

It does pay to properly clean a problematic disc first though, as some discs may have a very fine haze on their surface due to the plastic in the case, even with sealed and unopened copies.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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IMHO. Bit Perfect is overrated as it doesn't tell the full story. A few minor errors are usually inaudible and will not affect the overall SQ.

 

I couldn't disagree more. My ripping strategy is to get an accurate rip of the CD in a lossless format so I never need to touch the CD again.

 

It does pay to properly clean a problematic disc first though, as some discs may have a very fine haze on their surface due to the plastic in the case, even with sealed and unopened copies.

 

This is good advice. You may also want to the clean the lens of your CD drive using something like this:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Allsop-56500-CD-Laser-Lens-Cleaner/dp/B00000J1QK

 

I had problems with errors that went away using a similar cleaner.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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I couldn't disagree more. My ripping strategy is to get an accurate rip of the CD in a lossless format so I never need to touch the CD again.

It should also be noted that Solstice 380, in another current thread doesn't agree with you either.

I am now far from the only member who hears these differences due to power supplies etc.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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It should also be noted that Solstice 380, in another current thread doesn't agree with you either.

I am now far from the only member who hears these differences due to power supplies etc.

 

Not sure what this has to do with the subject of this thread.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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IMHO. Bit Perfect is overrated as it doesn't tell the full story. A few minor errors are usually inaudible and will not affect the overall SQ.

If the tracks sound fine when played after ripping don't worry about it.

It does pay to properly clean a problematic disc first though, as some discs may have a very fine haze on their surface due to the plastic in the case, even with sealed and unopened copies.

 

 

I thought bit perfect was making sure you play the files back at the same rate in which they were originally encoded? For example, if you rip a redbook CD, bit perfect playback would be 16/44. Wouldn't ripping errors qualify as something other than bit perfect? I get that the error itself may not bit perfect, just because that section of the file is damaged, but wouldn't all of the undamaged music still qualify as bit perfect (assuming proper playback at the correct bit rate)?

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I thought bit perfect was making sure you play the files back at the same rate in which they were originally encoded? For example, if you rip a redbook CD, bit perfect playback would be 16/44. Wouldn't ripping errors qualify as something other than bit perfect? I get that the error itself may not bit perfect, just because that section of the file is damaged, but wouldn't all of the undamaged music still qualify as bit perfect (assuming proper playback at the correct bit rate)?

No, Bit Perfect is only about ensuring that the retrieved Data (1s and 0s) are identical to that on the disc. This also applies to video.

A single masked error that doesn't noticeably affect playback will result in the file no longer being Bit Perfect.

A minor scratch, or a slightly greasy fingermark caused during handling often results in a Read Error, but that doesn't mean that the track will necessarily become unplayable.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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I should let you all know that I have been using my MacBook Pro's internal SuperDrive for all of my CD ripping over the past 3 years. Further, I have not ripped too many CDs, as I do not have a lot of CDs. The rest of my music collection is in the form of hi-res downloads.

 

I can look into Optrix for the disc, and for any future disc. May be a good idea as I am planning to purchase some more good CDs from the likes of Sheffield Lab, Mapleshade, and another audiophile label or two -- also some good redbook CDs like Steve Miller Band's "Fly Like an Eagle" 30th Ann. CD.

 

I could also pop in to the Apple Store and ask about an external optical disc drive...suggestions???

 

It will be a few months before I finally get my first DAC/headphone amp (most likely, the Ayre Pono), and most likely a pair of headphones like AudioQuest's NightHawks using their supplied balanced headphone cable for pure balanced operation.

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I had this happen with a few CDs.

 

A lens cleaner might help.

 

You can also try toothpaste on a scratched CD (hit up Google), it worked for me.

 

For a new CD without scratches it might not be a solution.

 

I'd start with ripping on another optical drive.

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world - Martin Luther

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I had this happen with a few CDs.

 

A lens cleaner might help.

 

You can also try toothpaste on a scratched CD (hit up Google), it worked for me.

 

For a new CD without scratches it might not be a solution.

 

I'd start with ripping on another optical drive.

 

Has anyone tried OWC/MacSales and shopped for an external CD/DVD (Blu-Ray not necessary) drive like, for example, an OWC model for $39 such as this.....

 

OWC Slim USB 2.0 Portable Tray-Loading 8X DVD DL+CD... in stock at OWC

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Has anyone tried OWC/MacSales and shopped for an external CD/DVD (Blu-Ray not necessary) drive like, for example, an OWC model for $39 such as this.....

 

OWC Slim USB 2.0 Portable Tray-Loading 8X DVD DL+CD... in stock at OWC

 

I haven't bought a CD drive from OWC but I've bought a ton of other stuff from them and have always been happy with both the service and the quality of their products.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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Yesterday, I ripped a brand new CD, The Amanda Albums (a Sheffield Lab CD that has the 2 albums of vocalist Amanda McBroom and musician Lincoln Mayorga), into my Mac. I use XLD when ripping all CD's. The XLD "report" on the first album, "Growing Up In Hollywood Town", said "all tracks accurately ripped". The XLD "report" on the second album, "West Of Oz", indicated that tracks 5,6,7, and 8 (of a total of 10 tracks) did not rip accurately.

 

This is a first for me in my 3 years of ripping CDs (not too many CDs, though). Is there anything I can do about this, or can anyone offer advice or share any similar experiences?

 

Thanks.....

 

IME, most of these issues disappear when you clean the CD. And if they don't, the question remains can you hear a problem? If you have one bit that isn't recorded perfectly you will get "innaccurate", but it may make no difference to you.

Main listening (small home office):

Main setup: Surge protector +_iFi  AC iPurifiers >Isol-8 Mini sub Axis Power Conditioning+Isolation>QuietPC Low Noise Server>Roon (Audiolense DRC)>Stack Audio Link II>Kii Control>Kii Three >GIK Room Treatments.

Secondary Listening: Server with Audiolense RC>RPi4 or analog>Matrix Element i Streamer/DAC (XLR)+Schiit Freya>Kii Three .

Bedroom: SBTouch to Cambridge Soundworks Desktop Setup.
Living Room/Kitchen: RPi 3B+ running RoPieee to a pair of Morel Hogtalare. 

All absolute statements about audio are false :)

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IME, most of these issues disappear when you clean the CD. And if they don't, the question remains can you hear a problem? If you have one bit that isn't recorded perfectly you will get "innaccurate", but it may make no difference to you.

 

I agree.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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Has anyone tried OWC/MacSales and shopped for an external CD/DVD (Blu-Ray not necessary) drive like, for example, an OWC model for $39 such as this.....

 

OWC Slim USB 2.0 Portable Tray-Loading 8X DVD DL+CD... in stock at OWC

 

These are convenient because they are bus powered. But, I've seen bus powered drives fail to rip because they shut down when the drive sucks current to start spinning. Some even come with 2 USB cables to get enough power out of the USB bus. OS X power management thinks it's going to fry and shuts it down, so they use 2 USB ports to split the load. You are better off powering the drive from its own DC source. A wall wart SMPS is typically supplied but you would do better with even a low cost linear supply to replace it, if you want the best rip. Just my $0.02.

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These are convenient because they are bus powered. But, I've seen bus powered drives fail to rip because they shut down when the drive sucks current to start spinning. Some even come with 2 USB cables to get enough power out of the USB bus.

They should work without problems using a single USB 3.0 port, which IIRC has 900mA capabilities. My portable Samsung USB 2.0 writer does.

Yes, an external +5V Linear PSU will give improved rips .

A USB Regen may also help too ?

Alex

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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To rip CDs? Aren't you guys carrying things too far?

 

I can hear clear differences between a rip made using a Samsung USB powered writer and rips made with an internal LG BG writer when saved to an internal SSD with an improved Linear PSU. Rips saved directly to and played directly from a USB memory stick with a USB Regen inline sound markedly better than rips saved directly to a USB memory stick without a Regen, and the differences can be heard between files saved to USB memory , with and without the Regen in line when plugged into a USB port of an Oppo 95 or 103 with the Regen in line. I haven't tried the USB Regen in line with the external USB writer yet though, due to time constraints at the moment, plus the fact that the Regen is not likely to be able to directly provide adequate current to most USB writers.

I have obtained better results from the Samsung writer when using a low noise external +5V 1A Linear PSU though.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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I can hear clear differences between a rip made using a Samsung USB powered writer and rips made with an internal LG BG writer when saved to an internal SSD with an improved Linear PSU. Rips saved directly to and played directly from a USB memory stick with a USB Regen inline sound markedly better than rips saved directly to a USB memory stick without a Regen, and the differences can be heard between files saved to USB memory , with and without the Regen in line when plugged into a USB port of an Oppo 95 or 103 with the Regen in line. I haven't tried the USB Regen in line with the external USB writer yet though, due to time constraints at the moment, plus the fact that the Regen is not likely to be able to directly provide adequate current to most USB writers.

 

Sandy,

 

Then to paraphrase you're saying that when using the Regen with your system there is a noticeable and audible difference?

 

That seems to be the common factor in the examples you have given.

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Sandy,

 

Then to paraphrase you're saying that when using the Regen with your system there is a noticeable and audible difference?

 

That seems to be the common factor in the examples you have given.

 

 

Yes. It uses a very low noise +9V supply derived from a 12V Li Ion battery though.

I use Coax SPDIF from an internal Asus Xonar D2X soundcard with A.S.I.O. and cPlay playing from System Memory for these comparisons.

I only use the USB memory stick and Regen for plugging into my Oppo 103 when used as a transport with a higher quality DAC in my TV room.

We obtained similar results via a Oppo 95 when I took the Corsair Voyager and Regen to a friend's house.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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I just received the attached from Alfe in Paris :

The answer for accurate rip in CA thread is: aluminium layer thickness, during production when the aluminium target is at the end of life reading errors occurs.

 

Does the CD seem a little transparent when held up in front of a bright light ? I have a few earlier CDs that do.

Alex

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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It's already been stated in this thread, but keep in mind that "accurate" only means that the files are bit identical to those ripped by other users in the database.

 

It's reassuring in that the odds of multiple users having the exact same ripping errors are astronomically small, but the converse is not true. The fact that an individual user's rip is not "accurate" does not necessarily mean there was a ripping error.

 

In the rare case that XLD tells me that a track is "inaccurate," I give it a careful listen with headphones, and if there are no audible glitches, I am satisfied.

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It's already been stated in this thread, but keep in mind that "accurate" only means that the files are bit identical to those ripped by other users in the database.

 

It's reassuring in that the odds of multiple users having the exact same ripping errors are astronomically small, but the converse is not true. The fact that an individual user's rip is not "accurate" does not necessarily mean there was a ripping error.

 

In the rare case that XLD tells me that a track is "inaccurate," I give it a careful listen with headphones, and if there are no audible glitches, I am satisfied.

This is good advice.

 

The other good advice here is to try cleaning the CD; using an alternate CD drive if you have one (or can borrow one) and listen to the rip, and if it sounds alright having a big drink and listen without worrying!

 

Bit perfect and AccurateRip are tools... Use them but don't let them rule you!

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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It's already been stated in this thread, but keep in mind that "accurate" only means that the files are bit identical to those ripped by other users in the database.

 

It's reassuring in that the odds of multiple users having the exact same ripping errors are astronomically small, but the converse is not true. The fact that an individual user's rip is not "accurate" does not necessarily mean there was a ripping error.

 

In the rare case that XLD tells me that a track is "inaccurate," I give it a careful listen with headphones, and if there are no audible glitches, I am satisfied.

 

Agree 100%.

 

But having ripping over a couple of thousand CDs and having used EAC for a number of years, it is very, very rare that anything fails AccurateRip.

 

While I'm not saying anything failing AccurateRip is always wrong or inaccurate, I would however understand it means more attention is warranted. It could as simple as a bad or a scratched CD, but it could mean the drive is failing, maybe a HDD or a RAM issue, etc. especially if its repeated with another CD.

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world - Martin Luther

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