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15.36TB SSD Coming Soon


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It would be crazy to put this into an Auralic Aries Mini and call it a day.

 

 

 

15.36TBSSD_Main_11.jpg

 

Samsung Introduces World’s Largest Capacity (15.36TB) SSD for Enterprise Storage Systems

 

15.36TBSSD_Main_1

 

Samsung Electronics, the world leader in advanced memory technology, announced that it is now shipping the industry’s largest solid state drive (SSD) – the “PM1633a,” a 15.36 terabyte (TB) drive.

 

First revealed at the 2015 Flash Memory Summit in August, the 15.36TB SSD is based on a 12Gb/s Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) interface, for use in enterprise storage systems. Because the PM1633a comes in a 2.5-inch form factor, enterprise storage managers can fit twice as many of the drives in a standard 19-inch, 2U rack, compared to an equivalent 3.5-inch storage drive.

 

“To satisfy an increasing market need for ultra-high-capacity SAS SSDs from leading enterprise storage system manufacturers, we are directing our best efforts toward meeting our customers’ SSD requests,” said Jung-bae Lee, Senior Vice President, Memory Product Planning and Application Engineering Team, Samsung Electronics. “We will continue to lead the industry with next-generation SSDs, using our advanced 3D V-NAND memory technology, in order to accelerate the growth of the premium memory market while delivering greater performance and efficiency to our customers.”

 

The unprecedented 15.36TB of data storage on a single SSD is enabled by combining 512 of Samsung’s 256Gb V-NAND memory chips. The 256Gb dies are stacked in 16 layers to form a single 512GB package, with a total of 32 NAND flash packages in the 15.36TB drive. Utilizing Samsung’s 3rd generation, 256-gigabit (Gb) V-NAND technology which stacks cell-arrays in 48 layers, the PM1633a line-up provides significant performance and reliability upgrades from its predecessor, the PM1633, which used Samsung’s 2nd generation, 32-layer, 128Gb V-NAND memory.

 

Samsung’s new PM1633a SSD provides the opportunity for significant improvements in the efficiency of IT system investments through its high storage capacity and exceptional performance. These performance gains stem from Samsung’s latest vertical NAND (V-NAND) flash technology, as well as the company’s proprietary controller and firmware technology.

 

The PM1633a SSD sports random read and write speeds of up to 200,000 and 32,000 IOPS respectively, and delivers sequential read and write speeds of up to 1,200MB/s. The random read IOPS performance is approximately 1,000 times that of SAS-type hard disks, while the sequential read and write speeds are over twice those of a typical SATA SSD. Inside the new SSD lie Samsung’s advanced controller units that support the 12Gb/s SAS interface, along with a total of 16GB of DRAM. Samsung also uses specially designed firmware that can access large amounts of high-density NAND flash concurrently.

 

The 15.36TB PM1633a drive supports 1 DWPD (drive writes per day), which means 15.36TB of data can be written every day on this single drive without failure, a level of reliability that will improve cost of ownership for enterprise storage systems. This drive can write from two to ten times as much data as typical SATA SSDs based on planar MLC and TLC NAND flash technologies.

 

Further, the drive boasts a highly dependable metadata protection mechanism in addition to featuring a data protection and restoration software tool in case of a momentary blackout, which make enterprise systems more stable and manageable.

 

Starting with the 15.36TB density, Samsung will provide a wide range of capacity options in its PM1633a SSD line-up – 7.68TB, 3.84TB, 1.92TB, 960-gigabyte (GB) and 480GB later this year. With more choices in storage capacity, Samsung is reinforcing the competitiveness in its SAS SSD line-up. The Samsung PM1633a SSD line-up is expected to rapidly become the overwhelming favorite over hard disks for enterprise storage systems.

 

 

https://news.samsung.com/global/samsung-now-introducing-worlds-largest-capacity-15-36tb-ssd-for-enterprise-storage-systems

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

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If they could just make a 2To SSD at $200 instead...

Roon / audio-linux / dual PC / I2s FGPA Dac / analog tube processor / analog tube crossover / active speakers / dual subs / absorption+massive diffusion / ugly cat in the room

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If they could just make a 2To SSD at $200 instead...

 

Don't worry, sooner or later it's gonna happen. I'd say in 1-2 years SSD prices are bound to drop rapidly...

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Computer Audiophile mobile app

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Another drawback is the expected price of $13K.

 

Who actually buys these things at these prices, BTW. In what situation does such a thing make sense?

Main listening (small home office):

Main setup: Surge protector +_iFi  AC iPurifiers >Isol-8 Mini sub Axis Power Conditioning+Isolation>QuietPC Low Noise Server>Roon (Audiolense DRC)>Stack Audio Link II>Kii Control>Kii Three >GIK Room Treatments.

Secondary Listening: Server with Audiolense RC>RPi4 or analog>Matrix Element i Streamer/DAC (XLR)+Schiit Freya>Kii Three .

Bedroom: SBTouch to Cambridge Soundworks Desktop Setup.
Living Room/Kitchen: RPi 3B+ running RoPieee to a pair of Morel Hogtalare. 

All absolute statements about audio are false :)

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Who actually buys these things at these prices, BTW. In what situation does such a thing make sense?

People like Facebook and Apple with huge data storage requirements. Cheaper than building a new data centre with all its cooling/power requirements.

 

Of course they don't pay retail price!

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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Who actually buys these things at these prices, BTW. In what situation does such a thing make sense?

 

I can think of enough corporates and security agencies.

 

A suitcase of such SSDs would take care of all backups for most small and medium businesses. Imagine the savings on buildings, rent, power, manpower, etc.

 

I used to work in banking and have seen enough server farms and data storage centers, where such SSDs would be a huge boon. Obviously lower costs for the SSDs would be better, but anything that decreases the need for space, power, etc. itself would result in huge savings.

Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the greatest treasure in the world - Martin Luther

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