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Entire CD Ripping Inaccurately = Bad Disc? Please Say It Ain't So!


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As I've been steadily ripping my 3000+ cd collection, using DB Poweramp, I've run across an occasional track that initially rips inaccurately but generally over writing and re-ripping resolves that. This afternoon, I was ripping cd's from the special collectors edition of The Ties That Bind - The River Collection from Bruce Springsteen. The second of the specially remastered "The River" cd's has, despite four attempts to overwrite it, reported that every track is still "inaccurate". I'm afraid this may mean I have a bad disc, but am really hoping that is somehow not true. I just discovered that Amazon will not take back anything, for any reason, after 30 days, and this expensive (about $100.00) deluxe package was a Christmas gift from my brother, and there is no way to now replace that disc.

 

JC

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Have you tried it in a different CD reader?

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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I'm using my specially purchased super high quality external drive which I bought especially for ripping my library. It's handled over 400 cd's without any issue excepting an occasional single track problem. I don't have another drive except the far cheaper read only" drive in my pc, and that is not connected to DB Poweramp

 

JC

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If the disc mentioned is a new pressing of an already released one (as suggested here from Søren Abildgaard) it might have the same data on it as the first pressing, and therefor it will be recognized as this.

 

But the data on the new pressing may have a slight different offset (i.e.).

And bang, it wouldn't rip as accurate any more.

 

If you can rip the tracks "safe" - usually ripping the tracks two times each, you will be on the safe side.

Esoterc SA-60 / Foobar2000 -> Mytek Stereo 192 DSD / Audio-GD NFB 28.38 -> MEG RL922K / AKG K500 / AKG K1000  / Audioquest Nighthawk / OPPO PM-2 / Sennheiser HD800 / Sennheiser Surrounder / Sony MA900 / STAX SR-303+SRM-323II

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I'm using my specially purchased super high quality external drive which I bought especially for ripping my library. It's handled over 400 cd's without any issue excepting an occasional single track problem. I don't have another drive except the far cheaper read only" drive in my pc, and that is not connected to DB Poweramp

 

JC

If you are using a Win PC try the internal reader using E.A.C.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

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Have you tried it in a different CD reader?
If you are using a Win PC try the internal reader using E.A.C.
+1

 

Exact Audio Copy

We will win because our NHS is the beating heart of this country. It is the best of this country. It is unconquerable. It is powered by love.

-- Boris Johnson

 

We are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divide us.

-- Jo Cox

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If this particular disc is a re-release: Could it be it is a "copy protected" disc? If yes it may well be you will never get an accurate rip because discs of this type are defective by design: They force the CD drive or ripping software to permanently correct and interpolate and the results of that is always just a "best guess". I fear even if you rip that CD several times on your very same equipment, the results will probably never be the same. That is why you won't find an identical rip in the accurate rip data bench.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cactus_Data_Shield

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A few of suggestions:

  1. Clean the disc. This has worked for me on several occasions in exactly the same situation you find yourself. Even when the disc appears perfectly fine. Even when it is new.
  2. Try a different machine to rip it. I know you don't want to, but that may just work.
  3. Listen to the tracks. Do the rips sound okay to you? Then they are probably fine and there is some anamoly that is causing the "innaccurate" label. If you have a few songs in a 1000 CD collection labelled "inaccurate" by dbpoweramp - not really a big deal. As mentioned, the database may give you this answer even when the rip is fine. If you rip w/out asking it to check the database, will it rip the disc twice and tell you the rips are identical/secure? If so, you've got nothing to worry about.

Main listening (small home office):

Main setup: Surge protector +_iFi  AC iPurifiers >Isol-8 Mini sub Axis Power Conditioning+Isolation>QuietPC Low Noise Server>Roon (Audiolense DRC)>Stack Audio Link II>Kii Control>Kii Three >GIK Room Treatments.

Secondary Listening: Server with Audiolense RC>RPi4 or analog>Matrix Element i Streamer/DAC (XLR)+Schiit Freya>Kii Three .

Bedroom: SBTouch to Cambridge Soundworks Desktop Setup.
Living Room/Kitchen: RPi 3B+ running RoPieee to a pair of Morel Hogtalare. 

All absolute statements about audio are false :)

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This afternoon, I was ripping cd's from the special collectors edition of The Ties That Bind - The River Collection from Bruce Springsteen. The second of the specially remastered "The River" cd's has, despite four attempts to overwrite it, reported that every track is still "inaccurate".

 

I have experienced this phenomenon with some releases myself. The content of the disk(s) seems to be slightly different than the normal releases, thus they are not found in the accuraterip database.

 

I'm using EAC, and the report usually is "cannot be verified as accurate". If the two check sums from the test run and the rip match, I do not worry about it. If the checksums are different, it's usually caused by a bad rip; in that case the ripping program will have reported a lot of errors [1] during processing the disk. In that case I clean the disk (since yours is practically new this is unnecessary) and rip with reduced speed (as much reduced as the disk drive allows) - in 50% of the cases this produces a rip without errors.

 

Track  1

    Filename Z:\media\temp\music\The Brandos\Honor Among Thieves\01 Gettysburg.wav

    Pre-gap length  0:00:02.00

    Peak level 89.9 %
    Track quality 100.0 %
    Test CRC DD5BE5BD
    Copy CRC DD5BE5BD
    Cannot be verified as accurate (confidence 9)  [3B54B23A], AccurateRip returned [FF2207B2]
    Copy OK

I use a mild polish as used in restoring high-gloss paint only if really bad scratches can be identified to cause rip errors. Sometimes the result after polishing is worse than the original :-)

 

[1] EAC shows a CR2 counter which increments during the rip, also the drive speed will be reduced greatly due to multiple retries

Primary ::= Nabla music server | Mutec MC-3+USB w/ Temex LPFRS-01 RB clock | WLM Gamma Reference DAC; Secondary ::= Nabla music server | WaveIO | PrismSound Lyra

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Another program that you can use: CueRipper (part of Cuetools and in many ways superior to EAC, their only "fault" is not "read in lead-in and lead-out" something anyway current drives do not allow) Always rips the whole CD, check AccurateRip regardless of the offset correction... And if the CD is popular, and you know that was ripped with a reasonable amount of errors can correct them using his own database (CTDB + CueTools) Of course, if there are few presentations AR and CTDB the problem remains the same: How to tell if ripping is accurate?

 

In addition to the above recommendations, to make sure that your rip is accurate (as sure as it can be) :

Perform 2 extractions of the same CD with different units -with different chipset -

If you applied offset correction and the checksum is identical, have very (very very very... ) high chances of having achieved an exact rip. It is cumbersome, but it is kind of private AccurateRip verification.

 

Sorry for my english

[...] "Do fathers always know more than sons?" and the father said, "yes". The next question was, "Daddy, who invented the steam engine?" and the father said, "James Watt." And then the son came back with "- but why didn't James Watt's father invent it?"

Gregory Bateson

Steps to an Ecology of Mind (...)

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I'm using my specially purchased super high quality external drive which I bought especially for ripping my library. It's handled over 400 cd's without any issue excepting an occasional single track problem. I don't have another drive except the far cheaper read only" drive in my pc, and that is not connected to DB Poweramp

 

JC

 

Hi TubeLover,

 

You can try FREE edition of my AuI ConverteR. Me interesting result after ripping the disk.

 

AuI's ripper under Mac have other principle. And currently report about errors (detect it with precision to byte). But, as I understand, you use PC.

AuI ConverteR 48x44 - HD audio converter/optimizer for DAC of high resolution files

ISO, DSF, DFF (1-bit/D64/128/256/512/1024), wav, flac, aiff, alac,  safe CD ripper to PCM/DSF,

Seamless Album Conversion, AIFF, WAV, FLAC, DSF metadata editor, Mac & Windows
Offline conversion save energy and nature

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