Jump to content
IGNORED

SSD with SATA interface: a recommendation?


Recommended Posts

AFAIK, my G5 supports an SATA connection, but the drives you mention are SATAII -- are the SATAII drives "backward compatible" with the older SATA interface? Or does that even make sense?

 

edit: a little research, and yes, it seems the drives are backward compatible even if the advantages of the increased speed will not be realized. Interesting. Would it be worth it then?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SATA I speed is 1.5 Gbit/s v. SATA II at 3 Gbit/s. Chances are pretty low you will saturate the SATA I interface with over 1.5 Gbit/s running a music server. Other than speed the benefits are lower heat, removing a major moving part in the computer, and many of us hear a big sonic impact moving to SSDs.

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Clay - What I hear is a combination of low level detail likely brought out because of less background "noise" and a much clearer presentation. I know it may sound weird but things are much clearer. Almost like spinning drives muddy the waters so-to-speak and NAS drives make the waters even muddier.

 

I will say that the sonic differences are more apparent on more resolving systems. For example the Magico M5 & Boulder system at the Symposium made this difference very evident. A month or so before the Symposium I was listening to Magico Minis with Pass Labs amps and a Pacific Microsonics Model Two DAC and the difference was also readily evident to those of us listening. On the other hand, some lesser quality tube based systems I've used can make it hard to notice a sonic difference.

 

In general an SSD should not hurt the sound and can only improve upon a spinning HDD.

 

 

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"What I hear is a combination of low level detail likely brought out because of less background "noise" and a much clearer presentation. I know it may sound weird but things are much clearer. Almost like spinning drives muddy the waters so-to-speak and NAS drives make the waters even muddier. Chris"

 

Chris

Is that not what both Siverlight and myself have been claiming with respect to noise and vibration deadening of the Optical Drives and HDDs etc. ?

SandyK

 

"The differences were often quite subtle, but many members reported hearing improvements in soundstage,

the improved separation between instruments and voices, as well as a frequent comment about improvement in low level detail, and voices etc taking longer to fade out, due to what appeared to be an improvement in signal to noise ratio."

 

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/PC-Performanceupgrades-impact-sound-Honest-Canvass-Opinion#comment-24376

 

 

SandyK

P.S. There are much more indepth follow on replies by Silverlight in another thread.

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/CD-Japan-server

 

Also a very interesting article on jitter : Thu, 11/13/2008 - 10:42 — Cavaille

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/Best-Sounding-Software

 

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gang,

 

Any of the OCZ Vertex drives or the SuperTalent UltraDrives will work. Newegg as Chris mentioned is a great site to look for these as they give the raw speeds. Look for the highest read/write speeds which should be like 220 or better for read and over 125 for write. You don't have to get the MAC versions as these are just formatted and partitioned for MAC os. You can easily do all this in the disk utility.

 

I am not sure though if you maybe better just holding off and going to the Intel platform for better results.

 

Thanks

Gordon

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does anyone have any experience running a "new" SATA2 drive in "backward compatibility mode" (assuming that there is even such a thing) on an older SATA-only interface?

 

I was wondering if getting an OCZ SATA2 drive with all the bells and whistles would simply be a waste if the drive cannot perform well in a machine that doesn't support the high throughput rates. But if it throttles down to interface limits, well, that might not be bad at all.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I was doing just that until Apple released a firmware upgrade to make the SATA controller SATA II enabled on my new MacBook Pro. It worked great.

 

Get SATA II. Not many SATA I drives around. SATA III is coming out in 2010 though.

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I created a little app that creates a 1 GB RAM drive on a Mac. It doesn't install anything, can be ejected like an external hard drive, and disappears upon reboot.

 

 

Here is the download for anyone interested 1 GB RAM Drive.

 

 

 

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...